Q+A> Italian icon Mario Bellini on passion, the past, and the Kar-a-Sutra

Bellini's Kar-A-Sutra (1972) was exhibited as part of MoMA's Italy: New Domestic Landscapes. (Courtesy Mario Bellini Architects)

Bellini’s Kar-A-Sutra (1972) was exhibited as part of MoMA’s Italy: New Domestic Landscapes. (Courtesy Mario Bellini Architects)

Italian designer Mario Bellini is a master of many mediums: architecture, furniture, photography, and language. He was the editor of Domus in the 1980s and designed buildings all over the world, including the Department of Islamic Art at the Louvre in Paris. At 80, he’s intensely productive as ever. Recently, Humboldt Books published U.S.A. 1972, a book photographs he shot with his Hasselblad in the early seventies.

Bellini’s collaborative relationship with Cassina goes back decades and he’s created some of the furniture company’s most iconic designs. Cassina released several new pieces—a bed, a lounge—in the Cab family, the now-classic line he first began with a chair in 1977. To celebrate, Bellini embarked on a multi-city speaking tour. AN caught up with him at the Cassina showroom in Los Angeles.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> The Center for Land Use Interpretation investigates “The Landscape of Golf in America”

(Courtesy CLUI)

(Courtesy CLUI)

Foreground: The Landscape of Golf in America
Center for Land Use Interpretation
9331 Venice Boulevard, Culver City, CA
Through September 21

As one of few sports determined entirely by terrain, golf’s field of play is an irregular form defined by outdoor features: grass, trees, sands, mounds, and water. Most sports are played on rectangles of constant dimension, but not golf.

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Eavesdrop> Hollywood Hits the Beach: Who will live in Michael Maltzan’s new triangular house?

Eavesdroplet, West
Thursday, July 2, 2015
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(Courtesy Michael Maltzan)

(Courtesy Michael Maltzan)

Rumor has it that Michael Maltzan Architecture (MMA) is hard at work on a triangle-shaped Malibu home for one of Hollywood’s biggest names. The MMA crew is keeping mum on the client, but we’ve heard it’s not an actor. Geometric coastal living for a director or producer, perhaps?

More renderings after the jump.

New Lakers headquarters by Rossetti and Perkins+Will gives team home court advantage

A state of the art facility caters to Lakers players and fans. (Courtesy Rosetti)

A state of the art facility caters to Lakers players and fans. (Courtesy Rossetti)

As Los Angeles braces for the likelihood of one or more new football stadium projects, the National Basketball Association’s Los Angeles Lakers have unveiled plans for a sports facility of its own. Rossetti, a design firm specializing in the sports and entertainment industries, teamed up with the L.A. office of Perkins+Will on a 120,000-square-foot training center and administrative headquarters. Read More

On View> Arik Levy reflects on design with his new exhibit at Los Angeles’ Please Do Not Enter gallery

Art, Design, On View, West
Monday, June 15, 2015
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Installation view of Arik Levy Intimate Formations on view at Please Do Not Enter. (Marcia Prentice)

Installation view of Arik Levy Intimate Formations on view at Please Do Not Enter. (Marcia Prentice)

The announcement for Arik Levy: Intimate Formations, the inaugural exhibition at Please Do Not Enter that just opened in Downtown Los Angeles, reads Levy is an “artist, technician, photographer, designer, video artist.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Munching on air pollutants: Would you eat these meringues made from the smog you breathe every day?

(Courtesy The Center for Genomic Gastronomy)

(Courtesy The Center for Genomic Gastronomy)

How do you coax city slickers to really take notice of air pollution? Start selling meringues, of course. At this year’s Ideas City festival in New York City, the Center for Genomic Gastronomy set up a “Smog Tasting” food cart introducing aeroir (a play on terroir for the atmospheric taste of place) meringues infused with recreated urban smog from four cities.

Continue reading after the jump.

Eavesdrop> Jerde Music: Noted architect gets an exuberant farewell at Los Angeles’ Union Station

Eavesdroplet, Obit, West
Tuesday, June 9, 2015
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(Ali Wade / Flickr)

(Ali Wade / Flickr)

One of Los Angeles‘ most influential architects, Jon Jerde, who recently passed away, was known for the ebullience and animation of his designs. So it was only fitting that his funeral be held at LA’s stunning Union Station, inside the Grand Concourse, accompanied by nothing less than a full Mariachi band. When Eavesdrop finally goes to the Page Six in the sky, this is exactly how we would like to go out.

San Francisco’s “Murmur Wall” installation tells your secrets in public

Murmur Wall by Future Cities Lab  (Photo: Peter Prato Photography)

Murmur Wall by Future Cities Lab. (Peter Prato Photography)

We’ve all heard a lot about “smart cities” and “responsive architecture,” by what about architecture that tells secrets? Murmur Wall, designed by Jason Kelly Johnson and Nataly Gattegno of the experimental design practice Future Cities Lab, does just that. The pair describes their site-specific installation at the main entrance to Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco in as “artificially intelligent architecture.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Sea Ranch is 50: Kenneth Caldwell looks at the history and future of the iconic California site

Architecture, West
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
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Sea Ranch Condominium One (Eric Staten)

Sea Ranch Condominiums. (Eric Staten)

Studio Visit subject Moore Ruble Yudell is the legacy firm of architectural master Charles Moore, who founded the company more than thirty years ago with John Ruble and Buzz Yudell. Many of Moore’s architectural priorities are encapsulated in a unique community of oceanside homes he helped design, Sea Ranch, which just celebrated its fifty year anniversary. Celebrations of Sea Ranch’s birthday wind down over Memorial Day with a concert by the Kronos Quartet. Last fall AN contributor Kenneth Caldwell attended The Once and Future Sea Ranch, a one-day symposium on the community’s history and future. Below are his notes.

Continue reading after the jump.

Here are three bold designs from winning teams that completely reimagine the Los Angeles Convention Center

Architecture, News, West
Friday, May 22, 2015
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HMC Architects and Populous.

HMC Architects and Populous.

The Los Angeles Convention Center is desperately in need of an overhaul. Architect Charles Luckman designed the original boxy structure in 1971 and James Ingo Freed added the glassy Annex in 1997. Today, both buildings lack the square footage and amenities to add up to a competitive venue. Centers in Las Vegas or Chicago eclipse LA’s meager 870,000 square feet by double or triple square footage. Indeed, in the decades since the venue was constructed the whole approach to convention center design has changed.

Continue reading after the jump.

Among thousands of hacked documents from Sony, key emails reveal LACMA’s inner dealings

Architecture, Art, News, West
Thursday, May 21, 2015
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Zumthor's March 2015 revised scheme less fluid and more blocky. Courtesy LACMA/ Atelier Peter Zumthor and Partner.

Zumthor’s March 2015 revised scheme less fluid and more blocky. (Courtesy LACMA/ Atelier Peter Zumthor and Partner)

When hackers broke into Sony Pictures Entertainment’s email server in November 2014 and released stolen messages, the first stories to come out were Hollywood fodder. But buried inside the glut of toxic gossip, star salaries, and Emma Stone’s junior high school pictures are emails that tie together Sony CEO Michael Lynton, Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) director Michael Govan, LA County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, and Peter Zumthor’s proposed design for the LACMA campus.

Continue reading after the jump.

Joseph Wong to design mixed-use, high-rise development in downtown San Diego

Joseph Wong is lead architect for The Block, a mixed-use, high-rise development in downtown San Diego. (Courtesy Zephyr/JWDA)

Joseph Wong is lead architect for The Block, a mixed-use, high-rise development in downtown San Diego. (Courtesy Zephyr)

Local real estate and investment company Zephyr has named Joseph Wong of Joseph Wong Design Associates (JWDA) lead architect of their 60,000-square-foot mixed-use development planned for downtown San Diego. The Block, as it is currently known (the developer has yet to select a final name), will be the first high-rise, mixed-use project in the city since the recession. With an estimated cost exceeding $250 million, the development promises to be a major player in the demographic and architectural transformation of San Diego’s urban core.

Continue reading after the jump.

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