De Blasio administration unveils East New York rezoning to promote affordable housing

Development, East, News, Urbanism
Wednesday, February 4, 2015
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A portion of East New York to be rezoned. (Courtesy Bing)

A portion of East New York to be rezoned. (Courtesy Bing)

The de Blasio Administration has unveiled new details for one of the most significant pieces of its ambitious affordable housing plan: the rezoning of Brooklyn’s East New York neighborhood.

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Martinez + Johnson complete stunning restoration of Brooklyn’s Kings Theatre

The Kings Theatre.

The Kings Theatre.

Last fall, AN had the pleasure of touring the historic Kings Theatre in Flatbush, Brooklyn in the midst of it is meticulous restoration by the Washington, D.C.–based Martinez+Johnson. The grand theatre, with its ornate detailing and 2,000-pound chandeliers, opened in 1929 with all the flair and flourish of Versailles. For nearly 50 years, the theatre—the biggest in Brooklyn—hosted vaudeville acts and films inside a grand auditorium that could seat over 3,000.

Continue reading after the jump.

DUMBO’s enormous Empire Stores warehouses are going to be very “Brooklyn,” and here are the new renderings to prove it

Architecture, Development, East
Thursday, January 15, 2015
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The open-air courtyard. (Courtesy Midtown Equities, Rockwood Capital & HK Organization)

The open-air courtyard. (Courtesy Midtown Equities, Rockwood Capital & HK Organization)

When AN visited the under-construction Empire Stores in Dumbo last fall, we were told that the conversion of the 19th century coffee warehouses into a 500,000-square-foot office and retail complex would be completed in just about a year’s time. “Year, sure it will,” we thought as we walked around the window-less, floor-less space that had no semblance of its planned rooftop park. Well, jump ahead a few months and it looks like our skepticism was misplaced. Crain’s New York reported that things are moving ahead right on schedule over in Dumbo.

Continue reading after the jump.

It’s Friday, so why not let this drone give you a birds-eye tour of New York City?

Screenshot from "Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!"

Screenshot from “Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!”

We know, we know, we know—the internet is being overrun with drone-photographed, time-lapse videos of cities and ruins. They are like cat videos, or BuzzFeed quizzes, or thought-pieces on Hillary Clinton’s ground game in 2016: they’re everywhere and they’re unavoidable. But sometimes they’re pretty great. This five-minute video by Victor Chu is called “Ultimate Aerial Video of NYC!,” and, well, yeah, it kind of is!

Watch the video after the jump.

COOKFOX’s second Pacific Park tower in Brooklyn breaks ground near the Barclays Center

Architecture, Development, East
Monday, December 15, 2014
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535 Carlton. (Courtesy COOKFOX)

535 Carlton. (Courtesy COOKFOX)

This morning, Greenland Forest City Partners broke ground on 535 Carlton Avenue—the second tower to rise at Pacific Park in Brooklyn, the development formerly known as Atlantic Yards. The COOKFOX-designed masonry tower will rise 18 stories and include nearly 300 affordable units: 50 percent middle-income, 20 percent moderate, and 30 percent low-income.

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Residential Buildings to Move into Two of Brooklyn’s Landmarked Theaters

Architecture, Development, East, News
Friday, December 12, 2014
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Rendering of new residential complex and Pavilion Theater (Courtesy Architecture Outfit)

Rendering of new residential complex and Pavilion Theater (Courtesy Architecture Outfit)

With the great big residential boom in Brooklyn, the typical housing stock (brownstones, apartment complexes, and the like) has grown scarce steering developers to set their sights on the properties most readily available and ripe for conversion: churches, schools, banks, hospitals, libraries, and even municipal buildings (who needs amenities or services, anyway?!).

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New York City to remove 96 sites from landmark consideration

The Pepsi-Cola sign in Long Island City would be "de-calendared by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

This Pepsi-Cola sign in Queens would be “de-calendared” by the Landmarks Preservation Commission. (Flickr / Whiskeygonebad).

In an effort to supposedly streamline New York City’s landmarking process, the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) will drop 96 buildings and sites from consideration for historic preservation. These sites span all five boroughs and include Union Square, Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn, and the Pepsi-Cola sign in Long Island City (above).

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Bush Terminal Piers Park finally opens in Sunset Park, Brooklyn

Park Entrance. (Courtesy NYC Parks Department)

Park Entrance. (Courtesy NYC Parks Department)

Finally. After years and year of delays, Bush Terminal Piers Park in Sunset Park, Brooklyn is open. DNAinfo reported that the opening comes more than 10 years after people started talking about turning the brownfield site into a public space. The long-anticipated park includes a waterfront esplanade, wetlands, tidal ponds, lawns, and athletic fields designed by AECOM and Adrian Smith Landscape Architecture. There is also a comfort station by Turett Collaborative Architects.

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Archtober Building of the Day #30> Sunset Park Material Recovery Facility

Architecture, East
Monday, November 3, 2014
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(Julia Cohen)

Archtober Building of the Day #30
Sunset Park Material Recovery Facility
472 2nd Avenue, 29th Street Pier, Brooklyn
Selldorf Architects

Eadaoin Quinn, the education and administrative coordinator at the SIMS Municipal Recycling Facility presented a classroom full of Archtober enthusiasts with a detailed and informative presentation of the automated process of material sorting and recovery that is recycling. Quinn told us about the machinery of sorting, starting with the “liberator shredder,” which opens the large garbage bags that recyclables arrive in by truck or barge.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Archtober Building of the Day #29> Green-Wood Cemetery Columbarium, Tranquility Gardens, and Chapel/Crematorium

Architecture, East
Monday, November 3, 2014
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(Center for Architecture)

Archtober Building of the Day #29
Green-Wood Cemetery Columbarium, Tranquility Gardens, and Chapel/Crematorium
500 25th Street, Brooklyn
PBDW Architects

The trend in burial at Green-Wood Cemetery is decidedly toward cremation. Built in 1838, and the final resting place of 570,000 people, it is “literally running out of space,” according to Green-Wood President Richard J. Moylan. He estimated they’ll run out of space for in-ground burials in the next five years. “We could pack them in tighter, but that would ruin it,” he said.

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Pratt Floats Student Work on a Mylar Cloud

Brought to you with support from:
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A cloud-like Mylar net supports architectural models in Pratt's annual graduate school exhibition. (Courtesy Michael Szivos)

A cloud-like Mylar net floats architectural models in Pratt’s annual graduate school exhibition. (Courtesy Michael Szivos)

Installation inverts conventional relationship between architectural models and images.

Each year, a group of Pratt Institute graduate students is challenged with pushing the boundaries of exhibition design as they curate the student work from the previous year. “The basic brief is for it not to be a show where it’s work on white walls, but that there’s an installation component,” said Softlab‘s Michael Szivos, who co-taught the 2014 exhibition course with Nitzan Bartov. The spring show coincides with the publication of Process, a catalog of student projects. “The book shows it in that more normative condition, year by year,” said Szivos. “The installation works in tandem with that. The hope is that the students come up with something different.” This year Szivos’ students passed the test with flying colors, constructing a floating display out of Mylar, medium-density fiberboard, cardboard, and Tyvek that upends the conventional relationship between architectural models and two-dimensional images.

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With deal in place, Citi Bike system set to expand in 2015

City Terrain, East, Transportation, Urbanism
Wednesday, October 29, 2014
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Citi Bike dock in NYC. (Flickr / shinya)

Citi Bike dock in NYC. (Flickr / shinya)

It’s happening. After years of talks and reports, it’s actually, finally, in-paper, happening—Citi Bike is expanding. Tuesday, at the Queensbridge Houses in Queens, DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg announced that the system of 6,000 bikes will double by the end of 2017—putting 2,000 more bikes on the streets than initially envisioned when the program was launched. The news comes as Bikeshare Holdings, a private investment company headed by the CEOs of Equinox and Related Companies, acquires Alta Bicycle Share, which oversees Citi Bike, and other bikeshare programs around the world. As the Daily News first reported, former MTA Chairman Jay Walder will serve as Alta’s new CEO.

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