A return to brick and mortar, Amazon.com opens first bookstore in Seattle

Architecture, Open, Technology, West
Thursday, November 5, 2015
The books. (Amazon.com)

The books. (Amazon.com)

November 3 was a big day for Amazon, with the opening of its first brick and mortar store, Amazon Books. The location? Seattle, of course. The 5,500-square-foot store inside the upscale University Village shopping mall replaced the former Blue C Sushi restaurant.

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The 2015 Alice Award winner for graphic publishing documents the open road

Art, Awards, National
Thursday, October 15, 2015
(Courtesy Aperture)

(Courtesy Aperture)

Now in its third year, the Alice Award has announced that The Open Road: Photography & the American Road Trip written by David Campany and published by Aperture (New York), is its 2015 winner. Campany and Aperture will take home a $25,000 prize.

More after the jump.

Hennessey +Ingalls to move from Santa Monica to Michael Maltzan’s One Santa Fe in 2016

Architecture, News, Open, West
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
Hennessey + Ingall's Santa Monica location will close at the end of the year. (Courtesy Hennessey + Ingalls)

Hennessey + Ingall’s Santa Monica location will close at the end of the year. (Courtesy Hennessey + Ingalls)

Hennessey + Ingalls is a rarity in an age when bookstores that survived the rise of Amazon are often indistinctive superstores or exercises in hipster curation. Los Angeles’ long-established mecca for art and architecture is neither. Fans were nervous when the store shuttered its Hollywood annex in Space Fifteen Twenty last spring. While the Santa Monica store on Wilshire and 2nd will close at the end of the year, it will reopen in a new space at One Santa Fe, the mixed-use development complex designed by Michael Maltzan Architecture.

Continue reading after the jump.

Berkeley designers propose building this pavilion entirely out of books, and you can help kickstart the project

Architecture, Art, City Terrain, West
Friday, April 3, 2015

Lacuna will be literally made of books (Project Lacuna)

Leaders of the Bay Area Book Festival (taking place June 5–7 in Berkeley) are teaming up with arts group Flux Foundation to make Lacuna, a wood-framed, yurt-like structure containing over 50,000 books, all donated by the Internet Archive.

Continue reading after the jump.

“Carousel of Light” Bookstore in Bucharest Occupies Breathtaking 19th-Century Bank Building

(Courtesy Square One)

(Courtesy Square One)

Forget, albeit momentarily, the speculated death of the print product. Romanian bookstore chain Carturesti has poured millions of dollars into the restoration of a 19th-century former bank building to house its second-largest retail outlet.

Continue reading after the jump.

Presents with Presence: AN’s 2014 Holiday Gift Guide sure to please all the designers on your list

National, Newsletter, Product
Thursday, December 18, 2014

(Courtesy J. Hill’s Standard)

For those in the A/E/C practices, there is little doubt about the greatest gift of all: time. While AN can’t source that elusive asset for you, we have assembled a collection of material goods that are designed to make life a little more elegant, efficient, and even fun. Happy holidays to all!

Elements Collection
J. Hill’s Standard

A fresh take on Irish cut crystal, this barware is marked by cuts and textures of varying depth, creating a graphic language. Designed by Scholten & Baijings.

View the full Gift Guide after the jump.

Daniel Libeskind, Bookie> Here’s what is on the starchitects reading list


(Courtesy Studio Daniel Libeskind)

In a recent Q&A with the Boston Globe, Daniel Libeskind made it clear that when it comes to books, he doesn’t just look at the pictures. Titles on the architect’s current reading list reflect a predilection for essays and short stories—Borges, Melville, and Walter Benjamin, among others. He told the Globe that he keeps a set of Edgar Allan Poe stories on his bedside table.

Continue reading after the jump.

New Guide Offers an Insider’s Look at New York City’s Urban Landscapes

City Terrain, East
Tuesday, July 2, 2013
West Harlem Piers Park Credit. (Alison Cartwright)

West Harlem Piers Park Credit. (Alison Cartwright)

In just the nick of time for outdoor summer weekends in New York City, Norton Architecture and Design Books has released a Guide to New York City Urban Landscapes. It’s a concise and beautifully illustrated guide to thirty-eight public spaces that claims to be the “first wide-ranging survey of New York urban landscapes from the first half of the nineteenth century to, well, tomorrow.”

Continue reading after the jump.

PRODUCT> “Le Corbusier and the Power of Photography”

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

“Le Corbusier and the Power of Photography”

Though books typically fall outside the scope of what we consider to be architectural products, we’re making an exception for Thames & Hudson’s new publication, Le Corbusier and the Power of Photography. Those familiar with Corbu’s much photographed architectural work may not know that he was something of a shutterbug himself. According to the publisher, he not only “harnessed the power of the photographic image to define and disseminate his persona, his ideas and buildings,” but his influence on the medium led to the rise of photography in general. From another perspective the book provides a more intimate way to access Le Corbusier’s creative process and some of the surprising inspirations behind his work, including images of him in his preferred office attire—his birthday suit.

More images after the jump.

Quick Clicks> Zombie Train, Chicago Scales, Tracking LA, Church Sales, and Booking Philly

Daily Clicks
Wednesday, November 2, 2011
Photo of the Day: Rahm Emanuel takes public transit with zombies! (Courtesy Mayor's Office)

Photo of the Day: Rahm Emanuel takes public transit with zombies! (Courtesy Mayor's Office)

Calm like Rahm. Halloween might be over, but we couldn’t resist sharing this Facebook photo of Chicago’s Mayor Rahm Emanuel riding public transit with zombies! The photo was posted with the following caption: “In case of a zombie apocalypse, remember to stay calm like Rahm.” (h/t Transportation Nation)

S, M, L, XL, XXL. The AIA-Chicago has released their latest round of awards and the Chicago Tribune‘s Blair Kamin takes a look at the winners, lauding the range of project scales undertaken by Chicago architects, from a small pavilion to the world’s tallest building.

Tracking LA. While Chicago has zombies, LA County has some cold hard cash. Everything Long Beach reports that eight key transportation projects were awarded $448 million including a 6.7 light rail line that is expected to become one of the busiest lines in the U.S.

Sacred sale. Bankrupt mega-church Crystal Cathedral has found a buyer for their expansive, starchitect-studded Southern California campus (think Philip Johnson, Neutra, and Meier). The LA Times says Chapman University will pay $50 mil for the site, allowing the slimmed-down church to stay and eventually buy back their core building.

Philly reads. In this economy, small book stores—especially architecture book stores—are struggling to keep their doors open. Philly is bucking this trend as the AIA Philadelphia opens up a new shop working with the Charter High School for Architecture and Design in Washington Square.

Graham Selling Books, Still Likes to Party

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Many have lamented the disappearance of so many architecture book stores in recent years, chief among them the much-missed Prarie Avenue Books in Chicago. The Graham Foundation is doing their part to begin to fill that void by selling a selection of books at their stately home, the Madlener house.

Tonight, the Foundation is hosting a holiday party and book store launch, from 5-8pm. The delightful exhibition, Las Vegas Studio: Images from the Archives of Robert Venturi and Denise Scott-Brown, is also on view. Stop by and stock up. The Graham Foundation, 4 West Burton Place, Chicago.

A Yearbook of Minnesota Architecture

Tuesday, July 6, 2010

A new go to guide for the Twin Cities and beyond.

Among the dozens of books that arrive in our office, I found myself quickly drawn into Alan K. Lathrop’s handsome new guide Minnesota Architects: A Biographical Dictionary. The volume includes nearly forgotten 19th century architects all the way up to leading contemporary practitioners like Vincent James, David Salmela, and Julie Snow. While the book might sound like a dry reference, Lathrop includes concise descriptions of the individuals and firms, including their educational and professional lineages. Black and white photographs, both contemporary and historial, illustrate the book, and most are larger than the postage stamp-sized images found in many guides. Lathrop  also connects professional collaborations between individuals, so the book feels like a yearbook for the state’s architects.

It’s a form of refence book that should be copied. For now, Minnesota Architects is poised to become the new standard reference for anyone looking to learn more about the state’s rich built heritage and its well developed professional culture.

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