Bjarke Ingels opens this addition to his high school with a parkour video of a kid jumping off the walls

Aerial view of the high school. (Iwan Baan)

Aerial view of the high school. (Iwan Baan)

Since Bjarke Ingels graduated from Old Hellerup High School near Copenhagen, he’s obviously become a bit of an architectural sensation. But that doesn’t mean Ingels is too cool for school, specifically his former high school. In 2013, the architect created an undulating recreation center for the school’s central courtyard that has a ribbed, almost cathedral-like wood ceiling. At the courtyard-level, the structure forms a a man-made hill where students can hang out between classes. And that was just the start of it.

Continue reading after the jump.

Hot Tub Design Machine: New York’s Van Alen Institute launches its annual auction of out-of-the-box architectural experiences

Architecture, East
Monday, May 11, 2015
.
Bid on an architecture roundtable at Charles Renfro's Fire Island's hot tub. (Courtesy Van Alen Institute)

Bid on an architecture roundtable at Charles Renfro’s Fire Island’s hot tub. (Courtesy Van Alen Institute)

If you have ever longed to explore nature with your favorite architect or discuss the built environment in your bikini, now you’ll have the chance. Well, for a few bucks, but in the good name of architecture. The Van Alen Institute has launched its online auction of Art + Design Experiences to coincide with its Spring Party, going down this Wednesday in Lower Manhattan.

Continue reading after the jump.

Product> Bjarke Ingels pours design into a bathroom fixture line for Kallista

National, Product
Monday, April 27, 2015
.
Taper-Web_08

(Courtesy Kallista)

Bearing a not-coincidental resemblance to his Vancouver House project, the Taper collection of fittings and bathroom accessories is Bjarke Ingels‘ first foray into the home interiors market. For plumbing manufacturer Kallista, it’s also the initial design collaboration with an architect on a suite of products.

Read More

Norman Foster or Bjarke Ingels, who will be designing the final tower at the World Trade Center?

Norman Foster, left. Bjarke Ingels, right. Foster's design for 2 World Trade Center, center. (Montage by AN)

Norman Foster, left. Bjarke Ingels, right. Foster’s design for 2 World Trade Center, center. (Montage by AN)

A few weeks ago AN noted that the Norman Foster–designed 2 World Trade Center might finally rise after all these years. The New York Times was reporting that Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation and 21st Century Fox were in talks to lease half the building for a joint headquarters. If it were to happen, wrote the Times, Murdoch’s team might bring in a new architect to update Foster’s design. Now it’s looking like that is exactly what’s going to happen—and it’s going to happen in an, ahem, BIG way.

Continue reading after the jump.

Here’s a sneak peek inside Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “courtscraper”

W 57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

W 57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

The construction-watching site Field Condition recently got to step inside New York City’s most anticipated new building. Yes, of course we are talking about Bjarke Ingels‘ pyramid-like W57 that is scheduled to open next year. As we have written recently, the structure has topped out and its enclosure is well on its way, but we’re just now getting a sense of what things will look like inside.

Take a look inside the building after the jump.

San Francisco developer nixes BIG-designed Arts Center, plans smaller project

Architecture, News, West
Thursday, March 5, 2015
.
An aerial rendering of the earlier design proposed for 950-974 Market Street. (BIG)

An aerial rendering of the earlier design proposed for 950-974 Market Street. (BIG)

A mixed-use complex designed by New York- and Copenhagen-based Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) is going to be, well, not quite as big. The San Francisco Mid-Market neighborhood has been quickly revitalizing since 2011, but the largest development in the area, located at 950–974 Market Street, has just been downsized.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bjarke Ingels proposes covering a Swedish powerplant with a colorful geodesic dome

(Bjarke Ingels Group via Design Boom)

(Bjarke Ingels Group via Design Boom)

Bjarke Ingels might be using his talents to embellish another European power plant. With his ski slope-topped waste-to-energy plant underway in Copenhagen, the Danish designer has unveiled plans for a biomass cogeneration plant in Uppsala, Sweden.

Read More

Pictorial> Facade rising at Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “courtscraper”

(Courtesy Field Condition)

(Courtesy Field Condition)

One of the most interesting buildings to ever rise in New York City is getting closer and closer to the finish line. We are of course talking about W57Bjarke Ingels‘ pyramid, or rather, “courtscraper,” on Manhattan‘s Far West Side.

Take a look at construction progress after the jump.

Video> Bjarke Ingels sketches the future of architecture on the floor beneath his feet

Ingels explaining "Worldcraft." (Screengrab via The Future of Storytelling)

Ingels explaining “Worldcraft.” (Screengrab via The Future of Storytelling)

The film starts from above. We see a white canvas and not much more. That is, until Bjarke Ingels enters from the upper left hand corner dressed in all black. He tilts his head backward, addressing the camera perched above him, and speaks: “If documentary is to document our world as it already is, fiction is to fantasize about how it could be.” The starchitect adds “architecture is the canvas of our lives.” He then gets down on his hands and knees and starts drawing on the canvas below him. Okay, let’s back up.

Continue reading after the jump.

Hotel that inspired The Shining wants you to design its 10,100-square-foot hedge maze

The Shining maze.

The Shining maze.

If you haven’t seen or read the entirety of The Shining then you’re going to want to fix that right away—like, right now. Use the time you would have spent reading this 225-word story with, say, watching the two-and-a-half hour film. It’s great; you’ll love it. Okay, with that disclaimer out of the way, let’s continue. You’ll want to continue.

Continue.

Bjarke Ingels is eyeing his second New York City residential tower, this time in Harlem

Development, East, News
Monday, December 22, 2014
.
Bjarke Ingels.

Bjarke Ingels.

With his “court-scraper” nearing completion on Manhattan’s 57th Street, Bjarke Ingels is doubling down on Manhattan. The Real Deal has reported that the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has filed an application to build an 11-story, mixed-use residential project in Harlem. While we don’t know exactly what to expect from BIG just yet, the New York Post reported that the structure could cantilever over Gotham Plaza. No matter what the firm brings to the site, it’s a safe bet that it won’t look like the standard-issue residential buildings rising in New York City.

In Construction> Bjarke Ingels’ “court-scraper” tops out on 57th Street

BIG's W57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

BIG’s W57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

When we talk about the batch of luxury towers coming to 57th Street, we’re typically talking about very tall, very skinny, very glassy buildings. But not, of course, when it comes to W57—Bjarke Ingels‘ very pyramid-y addition to the street he calls a “court-scraper” for its combination of the European courtyard building with a New York skyscraper. Last time we checked in on Bjarke’s pyramid—sorry, Durst would prefer we all call it a “tetrahedron”—it was only a few stories high. That was back in June, and since then, the sure-looks-like-a-pyramid has topped out at 450 feet and crews have begun installing its facade.

Read More

Page 1 of 512345

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2015 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License