Here are the winners of the AIA’s 2015 Institute Honor Awards in architecture

Wild Turkey Bourbon Visitor Center. (De Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop)

Wild Turkey Bourbon Visitor Center. (De Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop)

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has announced the 2015 recipients of its Institute Honor Awards, which it describes as “the profession’s highest recognition of works that exemplify excellence in architecture, interior architecture and urban design.” This year’s 23 recipients were selected from out of about 500 submissions and will be honored at the AIA’s upcoming National Convention and Design Exposition in Atlanta. That event will be keynoted by former President Bill Clinton. Now onto the winners in the architecture category.

View winners of the AIA Honor Awards in Architecture.

Eavesdrop> Renzo Piano to deliver high design with a low-minded name in Des Moines

(Montage by AN)

(Montage by AN)

Downtown Des Moines, Iowa, courted an all-star list of architecture firms for a new $92 million corporate headquarters that has the unfortunate baggage of being helmed by the world’s most cringe-inducingly named and spelled convenience store chain, Kum & Go.

Continue reading after the jump.

December’s Top Five: Here’s what you read most on the AN Blog

Santiago Calatrava's transit center in New York City. (Courtesy Port Authority)

Santiago Calatrava’s transit center in New York City. (Courtesy Port Authority)

With 2014 quickly receding into history, here’s a look at what blog posts AN‘s readers clicked on most last month. Big international stories, many with starchitects attached, abounded in New York, London, Los Angeles, Helsinki, and Rio de Janeiro. All of December’s top stories point toward the future, with many under-construction projects that will be sure to dominate additional headlines this year. Here’s a glimpse at what was in the news.

View the top 5 after the jump.

Bjarke Ingels is eyeing his second New York City residential tower, this time in Harlem

Development, East, News
Monday, December 22, 2014
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Bjarke Ingels.

Bjarke Ingels.

With his “court-scraper” nearing completion on Manhattan’s 57th Street, Bjarke Ingels is doubling down on Manhattan. The Real Deal has reported that the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has filed an application to build an 11-story, mixed-use residential project in Harlem. While we don’t know exactly what to expect from BIG just yet, the New York Post reported that the structure could cantilever over Gotham Plaza. No matter what the firm brings to the site, it’s a safe bet that it won’t look like the standard-issue residential buildings rising in New York City.

Night at the Museum II: Bjarke Ingels to re-imagine National Building Museum for new exhibition

Architecture, Art, East, On View
Thursday, December 11, 2014
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"HOT TO COLD" at the National Building Museum. (Courtesy National Building Museum)

“HOT TO COLD” at the National Building Museum. (Courtesy National Building Museum)

The Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) is returning to the National Building Museum shortly after its hugely-popular, and highly-traversed maze installation in the building’s Grand Hall. This January, the museum will present what is essentially a retrospective on BIG’s work called HOT TO COLD: an odyssey of architectural adaptation.

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Bjarke Ingels joins Foster and Gehry for Battersea Power Station redevelopment

Malaysia Square. (Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group via Battersea Power Station)

Malaysia Square. (Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group via Battersea Power Station)

Bjarke Ingels is slated to join elder architectural statesmen Norman Foster and Frank Gehry at the Battersea Power Station in London. The multi-billion dollar, mixed-use redevelopment was originally master planned by, yes, another starchitect, Rafael Viñoly. Ingels’ firm, BIG, joins the bunch after winning a competition to design a public space for the project called Malaysia Square. Why is it called Malaysia Square? Because, lest the Brits forget, the project is backed by a Malaysian development consortium.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pictorial> BIG’s Smithsonian Master Plan Revealed

Sackler Gallery from the National Mall. (Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group)

Sackler Gallery from the National Mall. (Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group)

As AN reported today, the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has unveiled its master plan master plan for the Smithsonian Institute’s south campus in Washington D.C. The $2 billion plan would transform multiple cultural destinations with new systems and facilities, and create a dramatic new public space. While the project isn’t expected to be fully implemented until 2041, you can scroll through the gallery below to get a sense of what the Smithsonian and BIG have planned. Learn more about BIG’s plans over here.

View the renderings after the jump.

Miami Beach approves revised convention center plan by Fentress, Arquitectonica, West 8

Public space at the Miami Beach Convention Center. (Courtesy West 8)

Public space at the Miami Beach Convention Center. (Courtesy West 8)

The Miami Beach Design Review Board has unanimously approved the scaled-back renovation of the city’s convention center. The $500 million project is being led by Fentress Architects with Arquitectonica covering the structure’s facade, and West 8 overseeing landscape design. As AN wrote last month, despite the center’s rippling aluminum exterior, the overall plan doesn’t quite pack the punch of the more dramatic (and more expensive) one drawn up by Rem Koolhaas. That plan came out of the epic head-to-head matchup between Koolhaas and his former student, Bjarke Ingels. Koolhaas ultimately won, but the design was scrapped, so here we are.

Continue reading after the jump.

In Construction> Bjarke Ingels’ “court-scraper” tops out on 57th Street

BIG's W57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

BIG’s W57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

When we talk about the batch of luxury towers coming to 57th Street, we’re typically talking about very tall, very skinny, very glassy buildings. But not, of course, when it comes to W57—Bjarke Ingels‘ very pyramid-y addition to the street he calls a “court-scraper” for its combination of the European courtyard building with a New York skyscraper. Last time we checked in on Bjarke’s pyramid—sorry, Durst would prefer we all call it a “tetrahedron”—it was only a few stories high. That was back in June, and since then, the sure-looks-like-a-pyramid has topped out at 450 feet and crews have begun installing its facade.

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After a high-profile design competition, Miami Beach Convention Center dials it back

Architecture, Design, East, Newsletter
Tuesday, October 28, 2014
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Miami Beach Convention Center. (Courtesy Fentress Architects / association with Arquitectonica)

Miami Beach Convention Center. (Courtesy Fentress Architects / association with Arquitectonica)

Remember that exciting design competition between Bjarke Ingels and Rem Koolhaas to revamp the Miami Beach Convention Center? Remember those two bold plans, all of those exciting renderings, and the official announcement that Koolhaas had won the commission? And then remember when the Miami Beach mayor said no to the whole thing and Arquitectonica was tapped for a less-expensive renovation? Well, now there’s a new milestone in the convention center soap opera.

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Bjarke Ingels returns to Denmark with “Aarhus Island”

Aarhus Island at night. (Courtesy BIG via Design Boom)

Aarhus Island at night. (Courtesy BIG via Design Boom)

With Bjarke Ingels’ pyramid-like tower—dubbed the “courtscraper”—rising quickly on Manhattan’s West Side, the globe-trotting architect has unveiled plans for his latest sloping project. And this one has the Dane back in Denmark. In his home country, in the city of Aarhus, Bjarke has created “Aarhus Island,” a mixed-use development along the water.

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Bjarke Ingels Lays The First Brick at LEGO House in Denmark

Ingels and the LEGO team at the recent groundbreaking. (Courtesy LEGO Group)

Ingels and the LEGO team at the recent groundbreaking. (Courtesy Edith Kirk Kristiansen)

The Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has begun assembling the pieces of its life-size LEGO House in Billund, Denmark. The wunderkind, himself, recently joined the LEGO Group’s brass (er, plastic?) for the ceremonial groundbreaking, which was really more of a brick-laying as six LEGO-shaped foundation stones were unveiled at the site. Imprinted on those stones were the words: “imagination, creativity, fun, learning, caring, and quality.”

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