Here’s a sneak peek inside Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “courtscraper”

W 57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

W 57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

The construction-watching site Field Condition recently got to step inside New York City’s most anticipated new building. Yes, of course we are talking about Bjarke Ingels‘ pyramid-like W57 that is scheduled to open next year. As we have written recently, the structure has topped out and its enclosure is well on its way, but we’re just now getting a sense of what things will look like inside.

Take a look inside the building after the jump.

These urban design projects top the AIANY’s 2015 Design Awards

(Courtesy Hy-Fi via AIANY)

(Courtesy Hy-Fi via AIANY)

A jury of architects, landscape architects, critics, educators, and planners has named the 35 winning projects of this year’s AIA New York Chapter Design Awards. “Each winning project, granted either an ‘Honor’ or ‘Merit’ award, was chosen for its design quality, response to its context and community, program resolution, innovation, thoughtfulness, and technique,” the AIA said in a statement. “Submitted projects had to be completed by members of the AIA New York Chapter, architects/designers practicing in New York, or be New York projects designed by architects/designers based elsewhere.” Take a look at the winning teams in the projects and urban design categories below.

Continue reading after the jump.

San Francisco developer nixes BIG-designed Arts Center, plans smaller project

Architecture, News, West
Thursday, March 5, 2015
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An aerial rendering of the earlier design proposed for 950-974 Market Street. (BIG)

An aerial rendering of the earlier design proposed for 950-974 Market Street. (BIG)

A mixed-use complex designed by New York- and Copenhagen-based Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) is going to be, well, not quite as big. The San Francisco Mid-Market neighborhood has been quickly revitalizing since 2011, but the largest development in the area, located at 950–974 Market Street, has just been downsized.

Continue reading after the jump.

Breaking! Renderings and video of Bjarke Ingels’ and Heatherwick’s Google headquarters unveiled

(Courtesy BIG & Heatherwick Studio)

(Courtesy BIG & Heatherwick Studio)

Just two days ago, AN brought you word that Copenhagen- and New York–based Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) and London-based Heatherwick Studio were teaming up to design the new headquarters for Google in Mountain View, California. At the time, it was only being reported that the complex would comprise “a series of canopylike buildings.” Well, now we know what those canopylike buildings will look like and a whole lot more.

Continue reading after the jump.

Check out these five finalists named in the Mies van der Rohe Awards

Architecture, Awards, International
Thursday, February 26, 2015
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Philarmonic Hall Szczecin. (Simon Menges)

Philarmonic Hall Szczecin. (Simon Menges)

Five projects have been short-listed in the 2015 European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture—Mies van der Rohe Award. Over the next few weeks, jury members will visit each of the five buildings and a winner will be announced on May 8th at the Mies van der Rohe Pavilion in Barcelona. You can take a look at the five finalists below.

View the finalists after the jump.

Bjarke Ingels and Thomas Heatherwick are reportedly designing Google’s new headquarters

Architecture, Media, Newsletter, West
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
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Bjarke Ingels, left, and Thomas Heatherwick, right.

Bjarke Ingels, left, and Thomas Heatherwick, right.

Presumably not wanting to be outdone by Facebook and its Frank Gehry–designed digs or Apple and its Norman Foster–designed doughnut, Google has tapped two architectural big hitters for its new Mountain View, California headquarters. According to the New York Times, the company is expected to announce that the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) and Heatherwick Studio are behind the yet-to-be-seen design, which given the two firms’ portfolios, should be pretty dramatic. But all we know at this point is that the headquarters will be comprised of “a series of canopylike buildings.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Bjarke Ingels proposes covering a Swedish powerplant with a colorful geodesic dome

(Bjarke Ingels Group via Design Boom)

(Bjarke Ingels Group via Design Boom)

Bjarke Ingels might be using his talents to embellish another European power plant. With his ski slope-topped waste-to-energy plant underway in Copenhagen, the Danish designer has unveiled plans for a biomass cogeneration plant in Uppsala, Sweden.

Read More

Video> Watch Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “Dry Line” form before your eyes

The berm. (Courtesy BIG)

The berm. (Courtesy BIG)

The Bjarke Ingels Group’s plan to wrap Lower Manhattan in a landscape berm to keep floodwaters at bay was definitely one of the most architecturally interesting proposals to come from Rebuild By Design, the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s competition to boost resiliency in a post-Sandy world. Last June, the plan—known as “The BIG U” or “The Dry Line”—also became the competitions’s biggest winner.

Watch the video after the jump.

Video> Bjarke Ingels explains his torquing Vancouver House

Vancouver House. (Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group)

Vancouver House. (Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group)

The Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has released a snazzy video of its eponymous leader explaining the design of Vancouver House, the firm’s upcoming mixed-use project in—you guessed it—Vancouver, Canada. As you can see from the photo above, the development is focused around a 52-story tower that appears to be twisting and expanding as it rises.

Watch the video after the jump.

Pictorial> Facade rising at Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “courtscraper”

(Courtesy Field Condition)

(Courtesy Field Condition)

One of the most interesting buildings to ever rise in New York City is getting closer and closer to the finish line. We are of course talking about W57Bjarke Ingels‘ pyramid, or rather, “courtscraper,” on Manhattan‘s Far West Side.

Take a look at construction progress after the jump.

Video> Bjarke Ingels sketches the future of architecture on the floor beneath his feet

Ingels explaining "Worldcraft." (Screengrab via The Future of Storytelling)

Ingels explaining “Worldcraft.” (Screengrab via The Future of Storytelling)

The film starts from above. We see a white canvas and not much more. That is, until Bjarke Ingels enters from the upper left hand corner dressed in all black. He tilts his head backward, addressing the camera perched above him, and speaks: “If documentary is to document our world as it already is, fiction is to fantasize about how it could be.” The starchitect adds “architecture is the canvas of our lives.” He then gets down on his hands and knees and starts drawing on the canvas below him. Okay, let’s back up.

Continue reading after the jump.

These four Urban Design projects made the cut for the 2015 AIA Institute Honor Awards

Target Field platform. (Morgan Sheff)

Target Field platform. (Morgan Sheff)

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has announced the 2015 recipients of its Institute Honor Awards, which it describes as “the profession’s highest recognition of works that exemplify excellence in architecture, interior architecture and urban design.” This year’s 23 recipients were selected from out of about 500 submissions and will be honored at the AIA’s upcoming National Convention and Design Exposition in Atlanta. Here are the winners in the urban design category.

View this year’s urban design winners after the jump.

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