Bjarke Ingels wants you to help fund the world’s first smoke ring generator

(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy BIG)

As if the ski slope Bjarke Ingels placed on top of his new waste-to-energy plant in Copenhagen wouldn’t already make it the most interesting power plant in the world, the Danish architect wants the building’s smokestack to puff smoke rings of carbon dioxide. Each ring will represent one ton of CO2 burned at the plant, which is being billed as the cleanest power plant on earth.

More after the jump.

Here’s your first look at what Bjarke Ingels has planned for Harlem

(BIG)

(The Bjarke Ingels Group

Since setting up shop in New York, the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has quickly become one of the most visible architecture firms in the city. It all started with the tetrahedron-shaped residential “courtscraper,” first called W57 and now dubbed Via, that is now nearing completion on 57th Street. And then there is BIG’s viewing platform at Brooklyn Bridge Park that has been likened to a Tostito. (That nickname has stuck, but the project’s funding has not.)

Now BIG’s building in Harlem.

Bjarke Ingels and James Corner give Philadelphia’s 214-year-old Navy Yard a boost into the 21st century

(Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group/BIG)

(Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group/BIG)

Bjarke Ingels is giving Philadelphia‘s antique Navy Yard a jolt into the 21st century. BIG teamed up with James Corner Field Operations to bring a $35 million office building, called 1200 Intrepid, featuring double curves designed to mirror the contours of Corner’s surrounding landscape.

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Koolhaas’ Garage opens in Moscow with a social media narrative

Architecture, International, Media, News
Thursday, June 18, 2015
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Garage Museum of Contemporary Art press opening with architect Rem Koolhaas, museum founder Dasha Zhukova, museum director Anton Belov and Garage chief curator Kate Fowle. (Instagram: @garagemca)

Garage Museum of Contemporary Art press opening with architect Rem Koolhaas, museum founder Dasha Zhukova, museum director Anton Belov and Garage chief curator Kate Fowle. (Instagram: @garagemca)

Last week another point was scored for social media as the de rigueur disseminator of architecture with the opening of Rem Koolhaas’ Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow’s Gorky Park.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bjarke Ingels mum on whether Two World Trade is a staircase for King Kong

(Renderings courtesy DBOX/BIG; Montage by AN)

(Renderings courtesy DBOX/BIG; Montage by AN)

The biggest architecture news this week was obviously the unveiling of Bjarke Ingels’ design for Two World Trade Center. The dramatic departure from Norman Foster‘s original proposal envisions the tower as a series of stepped volumes that gesture toward One World Trade. But does the step-ladder design—easily climbable by giant monsters like King Kong—pose a safety risk for New Yorkers? One petitioner is pleading with Ingels to change the design.

Continue reading after the jump.

With Foster rebuffed, Bjarke Ingels reveals his plans for a stepped Two World Trade Center

(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy DBOX/BIG)

In late 2005, Norman Foster unveiled his design for Two World Trade Center—an 88-story tower capped in four diamonds to direct the eye down toward the 9/11 Memorial, which, at the time, was still years from completion. Then, the World Trade Center site was still in the design phase, and Bjarke Ingels was a little-known architect from Denmark.

But a lot can change in a decade.

Bjarke Ingels opens this addition to his high school with a parkour video of a kid jumping off the walls

Aerial view of the high school. (Iwan Baan)

Aerial view of the high school. (Iwan Baan)

Since Bjarke Ingels graduated from Old Hellerup High School near Copenhagen, he’s obviously become a bit of an architectural sensation. But that doesn’t mean Ingels is too cool for school, specifically his former high school. In 2013, the architect created an undulating recreation center for the school’s central courtyard that has a ribbed, almost cathedral-like wood ceiling. At the courtyard-level, the structure forms a a man-made hill where students can hang out between classes. And that was just the start of it.

Continue reading after the jump.

Product> Bjarke Ingels pours design into a bathroom fixture line for Kallista

National, Product
Monday, April 27, 2015
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Taper-Web_08

(Courtesy Kallista)

Bearing a not-coincidental resemblance to his Vancouver House project, the Taper collection of fittings and bathroom accessories is Bjarke Ingels‘ first foray into the home interiors market. For plumbing manufacturer Kallista, it’s also the initial design collaboration with an architect on a suite of products.

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Norman Foster or Bjarke Ingels, who will be designing the final tower at the World Trade Center?

Norman Foster, left. Bjarke Ingels, right. Foster's design for 2 World Trade Center, center. (Montage by AN)

Norman Foster, left. Bjarke Ingels, right. Foster’s design for 2 World Trade Center, center. (Montage by AN)

A few weeks ago AN noted that the Norman Foster–designed 2 World Trade Center might finally rise after all these years. The New York Times was reporting that Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation and 21st Century Fox were in talks to lease half the building for a joint headquarters. If it were to happen, wrote the Times, Murdoch’s team might bring in a new architect to update Foster’s design. Now it’s looking like that is exactly what’s going to happen—and it’s going to happen in an, ahem, BIG way.

Continue reading after the jump.

These 2015 Holcim Award winners showcase the latest in sustainable design

Articulated Site. (Courtesy Juan Calle and Horacio Valenci, EPM Group (Empresas Públicas de Medellín) in Colombia)

Articulated Site. (Courtesy Juan Calle and Horacio Valenci, EPM Group (Empresas Públicas de Medellín) in Colombia)

The Holcim Foundation has announced the three winners in its Global Holcim Awards for Sustainable Construction. The international competition, now in its fourth year, celebrates projects that “deliver tangible benefits to local communities.” This year, the winners will collect a total $350,000 between them, and each walk away with a trophy. Take a look at the gold, bronze, and silver winners below.

View the winners after the jump.

Here’s a sneak peek inside Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “courtscraper”

W 57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

W 57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

The construction-watching site Field Condition recently got to step inside New York City’s most anticipated new building. Yes, of course we are talking about Bjarke Ingels‘ pyramid-like W57 that is scheduled to open next year. As we have written recently, the structure has topped out and its enclosure is well on its way, but we’re just now getting a sense of what things will look like inside.

Take a look inside the building after the jump.

These urban design projects top the AIANY’s 2015 Design Awards

(Courtesy Hy-Fi via AIANY)

(Courtesy Hy-Fi via AIANY)

A jury of architects, landscape architects, critics, educators, and planners has named the 35 winning projects of this year’s AIA New York Chapter Design Awards. “Each winning project, granted either an ‘Honor’ or ‘Merit’ award, was chosen for its design quality, response to its context and community, program resolution, innovation, thoughtfulness, and technique,” the AIA said in a statement. “Submitted projects had to be completed by members of the AIA New York Chapter, architects/designers practicing in New York, or be New York projects designed by architects/designers based elsewhere.” Take a look at the winning teams in the projects and urban design categories below.

Continue reading after the jump.

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