Dutch ecopreneur Joost Bakker designs zero-waste homes, repurposes carcasses for his restaurant and delivers flowers

(Courtesy Antarctica Architects)

(Courtesy Antarctica Architects)

Vertical gardens fully obscure the home of eco garden entrepreneur Joost Bakker like a mossy overgrowth. The eco entrepreneur, a high school dropout and florist by trade, also designs zero-waste restaurants, composting toilets, freestanding vertical green walls, and houses built from straw for a laundry list of clients.

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SANAA selected to design a daylight-filled modern wing for this revered Australian art museum

New gallery space by SANAA. (Courtesy SANAA via Art Gallery of New South Wales.)

New gallery by SANAA. (Courtesy SANAA via Art Gallery of New South Wales.)

Tokyo-based architecture firm SANAA has won an international competition to design a new modern wing for the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. The firm beat out the likes of David Chipperfield, Renzo Piano, and Herzog & de Meuron for the commission, know as the “Sydney Modern Project.”

Continue reading after the jump.

It takes a village: Suburban house addition in Australia creates its own skyline

(Courtesy Andrew Maynard Architects)

(Courtesy Andrew Maynard Architects)

Home expansion becomes ungraceful when it dwarfs its context—be it Corinthian pillars among shingle-style houses or an imposingly large annex. With this in mind, a family of five decided to extend their modest weatherboard dwelling upward rather than outward.

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Yayoi Kusama enlisted a pint-sized army to create this dotty, hallucinatory world

(Courtesy Queensland Art Gallery)

(Courtesy Queensland Art Gallery)

Admonishing your kids not to graffiti the walls may be forever futile. A new art installation by publicly deranged Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama entails children being given printed sheets of colored stickers and told to go to town on the walls, furniture, and fixtures of all-white living spaces. Everything from the upright piano to the cutlery and linens in the once-spartan rooms are dappled crazily in a disorienting clot of jarring primary colors.

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This tiny ultra-efficient PassivHaus was built in just ten days in Australia

Front view of the Passive House in Castlemaine, Australia (Courtesy CARBONlite)

Front view of the Passive House in Castlemaine, Australia (Courtesy CARBONlite)

Known for being economical in terms of space and sticker price, prefabricated homes are also boasting increasingly abbreviated build times. One modest-sized dwelling in Castlemaine, Australia took a mere 10 days to construct and garnered an esteemed sustainability marque from PassivHaus to boot.

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Everyone thinks Frank Gehry’s new building in Australia looks like a paper bag

(Flickr / Mal Booth)

Gehry’s latest. (Flickr / Mal Booth)

The most famous architect in the world agrees that his latest building kind of looks like a crumpled brown paper bag. But that’s not necessarily a bad thing, said Frank Gehry, the creator of the very wavy, very paper bag-y Dr. Chau Chak Wing Building at the University of Technology, Sydney. “It is a container, maybe it is a brown paper bag,” said the starchitect at the building’s recent opening. “But it is flexible on the inside; there is a lot of room for change and movement which I think in the world today is essential.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Such Great Heights: CTBUH names world’s best tall buildings

One Central Park (Richard Braddish)

One Central Park (Richard Braddish)

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, the nonprofit arbiter on tall building design, has named its 2014 picks for best tall buildings. Among the winners are a twisting tower in Dubai, Portland’s greenest retrofit, and a veritable jungle of a high-rise.

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High time for a High Line: Sydney Breaks Ground on New Elevated Park

Following it’s opening in 2009, urban planners all over the world have been keen on acquiring their own versions of New York’s much-lauded High Line. Sydney is the latest city to enter the fray, selecting a 500-meter stretch of abandoned railway as a foundation for the Goods Line, an urban park and public space, replete with bike paths, study pods and outdoor workspaces catering to local students.

Many more images after the jump.

On View> “Marc Newson: At Home” Opens on November 23 at The Philadelphia Museum of Art

East, On View
Wednesday, November 20, 2013
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Lockheed Lounge, 1988. Designed by Marc Newson, Australian, born 1963. Riveted aluminum, fiberglass, rubberized paint (Photography Karin Catt / Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art)

Lockheed Lounge, 1988. Designed by Marc Newson, Australian, born 1963. Riveted aluminum, fiberglass, rubberized paint (Photography Karin Catt / Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art)

Nearly three decades after he was launched into design stardom by his biomorphic, aluminum Lockhead Lounge (above), famed Australian industrial designer Marc Newson will soon receive his first solo museum exhibition in the United States. Presented by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, “Marc Newson: At Home” will collect furniture, clothing, appliances, and Newsons’ 021C Ford concept car within a mock, six-room home in the museum’s Collab Gallery. Gathered from collections across Europe, Japan, and the United States, in addition to Newson’s personal cache, the objects on display will highlight the various facets of the designer’s distinctive style of flowing lines, bulbous forms, bright colors, and industrial references which helped to define an era of industrial design. The exhibition opens November 23rd and runs until April 20, 2014.

Continue reading after the jump.

Jørn Utzon’s Sydney Opera House is 40! Celebrate With These 12 Amazing Photos

International
Wednesday, October 30, 2013
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Courtesy Matt Norris / Flickr

The Sydney Opera House, now a symbol of Australia and the Sydney Harbor, is 40 years old this year. (Courtesy Matt Norris / Flickr)

A big “Happy 40th Birthday” goes out to the Sydney Opera House this year, which is still looking good in its middle age. Completed by Danish architect and Pritzker Prize–winner, Jørn Utzon, in 1973, the iconic performing arts center is now an internationally renowned late modernist architectural marvel. Originally, when Utzon entered the 1956 New South Wales Government sponsored competition to envision two performance halls on the Sydney Harbor, his design was discarded. However, his “entry created great community interest” and the jury was persuaded to choose him as the sole architect in the ambitious project.

Utzon received the Pritzker Prize in 2003 and the building made the World Heritage List in 2007. The architect died one year later in Copenhagen but his vision lives on. Against a Sydney Harbor backdrop, the Sydney Opera House has become a graceful, yet dynamic symbol of Australia.

View the slideshow after the jump.

World’s Tallest Vertical Garden Planned for Sydney’s One Central Park Tower

City Terrain, International
Wednesday, October 2, 2013
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Rendering of Sydney's One Central Park tower. (Courtesy Atelier Jean Nouvel)

Rendering of Sydney’s One Central Park tower. (Courtesy Atelier Jean Nouvel)

Defying the standards of conventional landscaping, living walls take vegetated ground cover to the vertical extreme. For the past 30 years, French botanist and green enthusiast Patrick Blanc has made a quantum leap forward in the art of gardening by designing and building these living walls all over the globe. Blanc’s latest project—One Central Park Tower—is in Sydney, Australia, where nature’s tranquil features join forces with dynamic city life. The project is a collaborative effort between Blanc and Jean Nouvel. When completed, the major mixed-use urban renewal housing plan will boast the world’s tallest vertical garden.

More after the jump.

Herzog & de Meuron Chosen To Redevelop Historic Melbourne Train Station

International, Newsletter
Monday, August 12, 2013
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Flinders St. Station (Courtesy Herzog & de Meuron)

Flinders St. Station (Courtesy Herzog & de Meuron)

A team led by Herzog & de Meuron has been unanimously selected for the redevelopment of Melbourne’s historic Flinders Street Station after beating out a star-studded shortlist that that included Zaha Hadid and Grimshaw. The team will be awarded a $1 million prize. The winning design aims to transform the iconic 1909 train station into a 21st century civic center and transportation hub, preserving the most beloved features of the landmark building while integrating it into a contemporary urban context. The proposal also incorporates cultural, retail, and civic programs within an adjacent 500,000 square foot site along the Yarra River, including a public art gallery, plaza, amphitheater, marketplace, and permanent space for arts and cultural festivals.

Continue reading after the jump.

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