Norman Foster plants a new Apple Store in the heart of Chicago

Architecture, Midwest, News, Unveiled
Monday, November 23, 2015
(Chicago Department of Planning and Development)

(Chicago Department of Planning and Development)

Foster + Partners has revealed initial images of a proposed Apple store at the intersection of Michigan Avenue and the Chicago River. The new store will replace their existing Michigan Avenue flagship store six blocks to the north.

Continue reading after the jump.

Apple to lease HOK’s Curvy Central & Wolfe Campus in Sunnyvale, California

Apple to lease curvy office building by HOK. (Courtesy HOK and Landbank)

Apple to lease curvy office building by HOK. (Courtesy HOK and Landbank)

News broke last week that Apple plans to move into another spaceship of a building, the Central & Wolfe Campus in Sunnyvale, California designed by HOK. Read More

Apple is planning to build a viewing platform and visitors center so you can gaze upon its Foster-designed headquarters



Apple’s upcoming doughnut-shaped flying saucer of a headquarters is steadily taking shape in Cupertino, California. The Norman Foster–designed, $5 billion complex obviously strays from the typical office park setup of clusters of boxy, generic buildings, but despite its starchitect design, it has attracted plenty of criticism for how little it engages with the community and the non-Apple employees who walk among us.

But apparently that’s not the whole story.

Called out by Greenpeace for lack of transparency, Amazon commits to building solar farm in Virginia to power its data centers

East, Sustainability
Wednesday, July 8, 2015
(Courtesy Flickr/Creative Commons)

(Courtesy Flickr/Creative Commons)

E-commerce giant Amazon is under fire from groups to catch up to its tree-hugging counterparts. To boost its “green” credentials, the company has announced the building of a new solar farm in coal-reliant Virginia to power its numerous data centers in the region.

Read More

Eavesdrop> Sunny Apple: Cupertino HQ makes a big buy for solar power

We have given Apple flack for the suburban nature of its new campus in Cupertino. But we’ve been impressed with the company’s recent attempts to make things more eco-friendly, adding shuttles, bike lanes, a bus transit center, and walking paths. Now we hear Apple is purchasing 130 megawatts worth of energy a year from First Solar. The purchase will power the new HQ as well as all of its other California offices, a large data center, and the 52 retail stores in the state.

Video> Drone footage shows construction progress at Norman Foster’s Apple Campus

Architecture, In Construction, Newsletter, West
Wednesday, September 3, 2014


Perhaps the most hyped corporate campus in history, Apple’s Norman Foster–designed campus in Cupertino, is starting to come out of the ground. YouTube user jmcminn recently uploaded a video of a (loud) drone flying over the top secret construction site, where work began a few months ago and should continue through 2016. The circular foundations appear to be over a quarter complete.

Watch the video after the jump.

Goettsch Partners to design five towers in booming Shenzhen’s Qianhai district

Chicago's Goettsch Partners will design five towers for Shenzhen, China's Qianhai district, which Chinese authorities say will one day be the "Manhattan of the Pearl River Delta." (Goesttch Partners)

Chicago’s Goettsch Partners will design five towers for Shenzhen, China’s Qianhai district, which Chinese authorities say will one day be the “Manhattan of the Pearl River Delta.” (Goesttch Partners)

Goettsch Partners landed its largest project in China, a cluster of five towers on 15 acres in Shenzhen’s Qianhai district. China Resources Land Limited (CR Land) hired the Chicago-based Goettsch to design 5.4 million square feet of space for offices, apartments, a five-star hotel, and retail. U.K.–based Benoy is the masterplanner, and is designing a shopping mall and retail areas at the towers’ base.

Read More

Apple to build a new transportation center and increase shuttle service

Apple logo via Flickr by Incase

Apple logo (Flickr by Incase)

Like many major tech companies in Silicon Valley, Apple provides free transportation for its employees living in the Bay Area. About 28 percent of Apple employees do not drive to work, instead taking employer-owned biodiesel shuttles, biking, or walking. In an effort to bring that percentage up to 34 percent (a figure that will help get their new Norman Foster–designed campus in Cupertino approved), the company is expanding its fleet of buses and building a dedicated transportation center.

Continue reading after the jump.

Apple Makes Adjustments To Silicon Valley Campus Proposal

Friday, April 26, 2013
Newly released pedestrian improvements planned for Apple's Silicon Valley headquarters. (Courtesy Apple)

Newly released pedestrian improvements planned for Apple’s Silicon Valley headquarters. (Courtesy Apple)

Apple’s spaceship-like campus plans, designed by Foster and Partners, have been criticized for—among other other things— a lack of pedestrian friendly design. It appears the company has listened. New documents presented to the city of Cupertino show extended bike paths, winding walkways and private roads both circling the grounds and running through the center of the campus.  The bike lanes would have buffer lanes to protect them from cars, pedestrian walkways would have increased lighting, a transit center would be the focal point for buses, and the plans also make room for public art projects.

Not all the changes are eco/pedestrian friendly. The new design calls for an increase in parking spaces from 10,500 to 10,980. Slated for completion in 2016, the campus has also been in the news for budget overruns and delays, with Bloomberg Businessweek reporting its cost ballooning from $3 billion to $5 billion. The first phase of the campus is scheduled to be complete by 2016.The original date was 2015.

More new renderings of Apple’s campus after the jump.

Foxconn Said to Be Considering Investment in American Manufacturing

Thursday, November 15, 2012
A Foxconn factory in Shenzhen, China. (yandulangzi在线/Google)

A Foxconn factory in Shenzhen, China. (yandulangzi在线/Google)

Much has been made of the decline of American industry and, more recently, the rise of small-scale urban industry, but one of the largest international manufacturers, Taiwan-based Foxconn, could change the industrial scene completely if it decides to build factories in the United States. The Guardian reports that Foxconn is considering Detroit and Los Angeles for potential outposts thanks to rising costs overseas, but the company infamous for manufacturing Apple products among others at its 800,000-worker-strong Chinese facilities would have to adapt to radically different American ways of working.

Continue reading after the jump.

Zen-otaph: Steve Jobs and the Meaning Behind Apple’s New Campus

Newsletter, West
Thursday, December 29, 2011
Aerial view of Apple's proposed new headquarters in Cupertino, California. (Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Aerial view of Apple's proposed new headquarters in Cupertino, California. (Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Apple’s new campus in Cupertino has left the design community a bit perplexed.

Back in September most of the architectural critics who weighed in on the issue expressed a one-two combination of shock and disappointment. Precisely because of Apple’s design bona fides and Sir Norman Foster’s involvement as the lead architect, they were expecting better. Christopher Hawthorne of the LA Times called it a “retrograde cocoon,” marking it down as a car-centric, “doggedly old-fashioned proposal.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Slideshow> Apple Takes Bite of Grand Central

East, Newsletter
Wednesday, December 7, 2011
Apple moves into the Lexington Avenue balcony overlooking Grand Central (Stoelker/AN).

Apple staff await customers on the balcony overlooking Grand Central (Stoelker/AN).

This morning Apple held a press preview of their new Grand Central store, which is set to open this Friday. The first impression of this glassless emporium, an anomaly for the company, is the respectful handling of the hallowed space. The store fills the space vacated by Metrazur restaurant, which wrapped around the Lexington Avenue side balcony. Apple’s showroom takes up half of the northern balcony as well. For Mac fans, the cleaned lined furnishings will be familiar, as are the various stations spread throughout the 23,000-square-foot space. The Genius Bar is still there, as are the iPad and iPod stations, laptops, accessories, and a professional yet casual staff of more than 300. Apple, aided by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, took sight lines into consideration, as the only real hint that the store is there from the concourse are small strips of table lighting, and, of course, the company’s ubiquitous apple which hangs from a grand arch centered on the balcony. It could be argued that logo competes a bit with the world famous clock at the center of the terminal. But otherwise, the interventions appear considerate and reversible.

View the sideshow after the jump

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