Here’s how Amsterdam built an archipelago to solve its housing crunch

(Courtesy Amsterdam)

The islands of Ijburg, with Center Island jutting out to the right (Courtesy Amsterdam)

Amsterdam’s overflow population will soon have a roof over its head—and artificial sand bars beneath its feet. Europe’s boldest engineering and housing program yet proposes a series of artificial islands built over Ijmeer Lake, with shoreline houses occupying sand bars made using a so-called “pancake method.”

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New robot technology by Dutch designer can 3D-print a steel bridge in mid-air over a canal

(Courtesy MX3D)

(Courtesy MX3D)

New to the list of job functions up for replacement by technology: bridge construction. Dutch designer Joris Laarman has founded MX3D, a research and development company currently tinkering with a never-before-seen 3D printer that can weld steel objects in mid-air.

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Flood prevention scheme in the Netherlands creates unique byproduct: an urban river park island

(Courtesy Room for the River Waal)

(Courtesy Room for the River Waal)

After a close shave with nature 20 years ago, the Netherlands has sought to reinvent defensive flood prevention. “Room for the Waal” is an anti-flood program in Nijmegen, a city which spans the River Waal, Europe’s busiest waterway, where a sharp turn forms a bottleneck as it nears the city.

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This solar-power generating bike lane in the Netherlands wows engineers by producing more juice than expected

(Courtesy SolaRoad)

(Courtesy SolaRoad)

Performance-wise, the Dutch power-generating bike path, SolaRoad, has overshot expectations, generating upwards of 3,000 kilowatts of power in the six months since its launch. The 230-foot concrete strip is located in Krommenie, a village northwest of Amsterdam, and is undergoing a three-year pilot test for material feasibility.

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Harvard GSD announces finalists for the 2015 Wheelwright Prize

Left to right:  Work by Quyn Vantu, Malkit Shoshan and Eric L'Heureux. (Courtesy Ben Premeaux, Johannes Schwarz, Kenneth Choo)

Left to right:  Work by Quyn Vantu, Malkit Shoshan and Eric L’Heureux. (Courtesy Ben Premeaux, Johannes Schwarz, Kenneth Choo)

The Harvard Graduate School of Design has announced the three potential awardees of the 2015 Wheelwright Prize, a travel-based architectural research grant valued at $100,000. Each year, one architect from approximately 200 applicants bags the prize.

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Architects Offer a Glimpse into the Future

International
Monday, June 27, 2011
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WORKac’s Infoodstructure Brooklyn uses food to create new infrastructures

Glimpses of New York and Amsterdam in 2040 at the Center for Architecture (through September 10) is a clarion call for designers to redefine sustainability in architecture. Though it didn’t start with this intention, the visions of 10 young architecture firms imagining future landscapes of New York and Amsterdam raise questions about what changes are imminent for urban development and what part architects can play. The projects suggest both practical and fantastical interventions to improve the prospect of urban growth in the face of ecological, geographic, and demographic shifts.

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