London skyline as battleground: Designers render 3D-printed chess pieces in the shape of iconic architecture

(Courtesy Skyline Chess)

(Courtesy Skyline Chess)

City skylines can seem at times like battlegrounds, with architects vying for superlatives of tallest, grandest, and bizarrest. Skyline Chess, founded by London-based designers Chris Prosser and Ian Flood, reimagines chess pieces as miniature models of the city’s landmark buildings.

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New robot technology by Dutch designer can 3D-print a steel bridge in mid-air over a canal

(Courtesy MX3D)

(Courtesy MX3D)

New to the list of job functions up for replacement by technology: bridge construction. Dutch designer Joris Laarman has founded MX3D, a research and development company currently tinkering with a never-before-seen 3D printer that can weld steel objects in mid-air.

Continue reading after the jump.

Florida International University to be the first arts and design college to launch a Makerbot Innovation Lab

(Courtesy MakerBot)

(Courtesy MakerBot)

With 3D printing becoming a major impetus in cultivating startup culture, Florida International University (FIU) is launching a MakerBot Innovation Lab, a 3,000-square-foot makerspace for students and community members to develop product ideas and conduct research. Set to be equipped with 30 state-of-the-art 3D printers and four 3D scanners, the space can serve up to 60 students at a time, with one 3D printer between every two work stations. The school bagged a $185,000 grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation to build the facility.

More after the jump.

American Standard makes a splash with 3D-printed sculptural faucets as the brand turns 150

Design, International, Product
Thursday, July 2, 2015
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(Courtesy American Standard)

(Courtesy American Standard)

American Standard has debuted a series of high-end 3D-printed faucets evoking sculptural artwork. Formed by selective laser sintering, each design presents a creative play on the way water cascades from it. While faucets have long been prototyped using 3D deposition modeling, the plumbing and building product manufacturer claims that this series of luxury faucets is the first ready-for-market faucet wrought using powerful lasers.

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Beneath this 200 year old monument to George Washington, a time capsule filled with 3D printed scans will send messages to the future

East, Preservation, Technology
Friday, April 17, 2015
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(Ed Gunts)

(Ed Gunts)

What do you put in a 21st century time capsule inside the cornerstone of a 19th century landmark that’s undergoing restoration? If the landmark is the nation’s first monument to George Washington, you put in a 3D printed likeness of the first president, hot off the 3D printer, of course. That’s the idea behind the four shiny objects that will be sealed within an 1815-era cornerstone and placed below the base of the Washington Monument in Baltimore, Maryland, home of the aforementioned first monument to Washington.

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Synthesis 3D prints a rocking chair

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Fabrikator
Synthesis Design + Architecture's Durotaxis Chair showcases the unique capabilities of the Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 printer. (IMSTEPF Films)

Synthesis Design + Architecture’s Durotaxis Chair showcases the unique capabilities of the Stratasys Objet500 Connex3 printer. (IMSTEPF Films)

Durotaxis rocker features gradient mesh informed by function, ergonomics, and aesthetics.

For Synthesis Design + Architecture founding principal Alvin Huang, there is a lot to love about 3D printing. But he does not always like how the technology is applied. “I see it all the time—a lot of students just 3D print everything,” said Huang, who also teaches at the USC School of Architecture. “You see things that could have been done better, faster, or cleaner by hand. I find it a very troublesome predicament we’re in, we’re letting the tool dictate.” When Stratasys contacted Synthesis about designing a piece for their Objet500 Connex3 printer, the architects decided to turn the relationship between human and machine on its head. Instead of asking how they could implement a preconceived design using the Objet printer, they challenged themselves to create something that could only be manufactured using this particular tool. Durotaxis Chair, a prototype of which debuted at the ACADIA 2014 conference, showcases Objet’s multi-material 3D printing capabilities with a gradient mesh that visually communicates the rocker’s function and ergonomics.

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Video> Optical illusions come to life in Stanford designer’s mesmerizing 3D-printed zoetrope sculptures

Design, Technology, West
Friday, February 13, 2015
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The petals appear to seethe up and down (Courtesy Instructables)

The petals appear to seethe up and down (Courtesy Instructables)

Nature’s algorithms reign supreme in a series of revolving 3D printed sculptures by designer-cum-artist John Edmark, also an adjunct lecturer at Stanford’s Department of Art & Art History. The sculpture sits on a rotating base and animates when it is placed under a strobe light or filmed using a camera with extremely slow shutter speeds.

Watch the video after the jump.

3D printed pavilion in Ohio recreates the sun’s path at night

solar bytes pavilion (design lab workshop)

solar bytes pavilion (design lab workshop)

A luminous, arched pavilion in Ohio aims to highlight the potential of 3D fabrication techniques, and to so it’s mounting a Promethean stunt. The so-called Solar Bytes Pavilion grabs sunlight during the day and radiates light when it gets dark, recreating the day’s solar conditions minute-by-minute throughout the night.

Continue reading after the jump.

Custom Fit: 4D Printed Dress Goes to MoMA

Design, Product, Technology
Monday, December 15, 2014
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IMGP3052-Edit,medium.crop.1417364042

(Courtesy Nervous System)

Congratulations to Nervous System, whose Kinematics Dress was just acquired by the Museum of Modern Art (a prescient, pre-emptive move that might keep the curators of the Metropolitan Museum‘s Costume Institute awake for nights to come). While the physical product is certainly a head-turner, it’s the underlying technology that’s the true wonder—and maybe of greater interest and implication to architects.

COntinue reading after the jump.

LACE by Jenny Wu, Prêt-à-3D Print

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
Jenny Wu's jewelry line, LACE, includes digitally-designed, 3D printed necklaces, earrings, and rings. (Courtesy LACE)

Jenny Wu’s jewelry line, LACE, includes digitally-designed, 3D printed necklaces, earrings, and rings. (Courtesy LACE)

Oyler Wu Collaborative partner delves into jewelry design.

Oyler Wu Collaborative partner Jenny Wu had long dreamed of designing jewelry—just as soon as she found some spare time. Last fall, she realized that she might wait forever for a break from her busy architecture practice. “At some point I decided, ‘I’ll design some pieces, and the easiest way to make it happen is just to 3D print them,'” said Wu. She fabricated a couple of necklaces, and brought them on her just-for-fun trip to Art Basel Miami Beach 2013. “I wore my pieces around, and I was stunned by the response I was getting,” she recalled. “People kept coming up to me, literally every five seconds. After a while, I thought, ‘Maybe I do have something that’s unique, especially for a design crowd.'”
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Swedish professor creates a playable 3-D printed saxophone

International, Newsletter, Technology
Friday, September 12, 2014
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3D Printed Saxophone (Courtesy Lund University)

3D Printed Saxophone (Courtesy Lund University)

As the world of 3-D printing advances, it’s becoming possible to create more and more complex shapes and systems. Now, the technology is making waves in the music world. Olaf Diegel, a professor of product development at Lund University in Sweden, recently produced the first ever 3-D printed saxophone.

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IIT Students Explore the Potential of Carbon Fiber

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Fabrikator
Undergraduates at IIT designed, funded, and fabricated FIBERwave PAVILION during the spring semester. (Courtesy Alphonso Peluso)

Undergraduates at IIT designed, funded, and fabricated FIBERwave PAVILION during the spring semester. (Courtesy Alphonso Peluso)

Composite materials are on display in the undergraduate-built FIBERwave PAVILION.

Carbon fiber’s unique properties would seem to make it an ideal building product. Untreated, carbon fiber cloth is flexible and easy to cut. After an epoxy cure, it is as hard as steel. But while the automobile and aerospace industries have made widespread use of the material, it has gone virtually untouched by the architectural profession. Alphonso Peluso and his undergraduate students at the IIT College of Architecture set out to change that with their FIBERwave PAVILION, a parametric, sea life-inspired installation built entirely of carbon fiber. “We want to make the studio an expert resource for people trying to get into carbon fiber in terms of architecture,” said Peluso, whose students designed, funded, and built the pavilion this spring. “There’s a studio in Germany that’s in their second year of working with carbon fiber, but I don’t think anyone in the United States is working with it.” Read More

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