Eavesdrop> Jerde Surprise: Christopher Hawthorne smitten with new LA apartment tower

Architecture, Eavesdroplet, West
Friday, October 10, 2014
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The Vermont. (Courtesy Jerde Partnership)

The Vermont. (Courtesy Jerde Partnership)

In one of the more surprising analyses of his tenure as architecture critic for the Los Angeles Times, Christopher Hawthorne recently came out with breathless praise for The Vermont, a green glass residential tower by Jerde Partnership on Wilshire Boulevard and Vermont Avenue. According to Hawthorne, the building’s “sleek steel-and-glass profile is a reminder that new apartment buildings in Los Angeles can be something other than bland, stucco-covered, stick-built neo-dingbats.” Eavesdrop is no architecture critic, but let’s just say we do not totally agree.

Archtober Building of the Day #9> Kickstarter’s Greenpoint Headquarters

Architecture, East, Preservation
Friday, October 10, 2014
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(Inbal Newman)

Archtober Building of the Day #9
Kickstarter
58 Kent Street, Brooklyn
Ole Sondresen Architect

“Nothing is better than doing nothing.” While this may be the maxim that many of us live by on lazy Sunday afternoons, in Greenpoint, Brooklyn it applies to the design philosophy of Norwegian carpenter-turned-architect Ole Sondresen. During today’s tour of the Kickstarter headquarters, Sondresen demonstrated how this sustainable principle guided his design process.

Continue reading after the jump.

PART Studio Plays Peek-a-boo with Plywood

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
PART Studio designed the plywood Peek-a-boo Curtain to behave like fabric. (Courtesy PART Studio)

PART Studio designed the plywood Peek-a-boo Curtain to behave like fabric. (Courtesy PART Studio)

Louisville installation elicits fabric-like behavior from wood.

PART Studio designed and built their plywood Peek-a-boo Curtain in just four days, after a last-minute invitation from Louisville arts and business networking organization I.D.E.A.S. 40203. “We went to a meeting, talked about it, then drove to the plywood store,” recalled principal Nathan Smith. Luckily, the architects were not starting from scratch. Rather, Smith and partner Mark Foxworth seized the opportunity to build a full-scale mock-up of an idea they had been tossing around for some time: a curtain that, though built of wood, would behave like fabric. Staged at FirstBuild, a design and fabrication studio run through a partnership between GE Appliances and Local Motors, the exhibition also gave the designers a chance to explore the space between art and commerce. “With our piece we were looking not only to span the specific interests of the groups involved, but also to consider the relationships between product design, art, and architectural design,” said Smith. Read More

Archtober Building of the Day #8> National September 11 Memorial Museum

Architecture, East
Thursday, October 9, 2014
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(Eve Dilworth Rosen)

Archtober Building of the Day #8
National September 11 Memorial Museum
Liberty Street, Manhattan
Davis Brody Bond

The space is cavernous. Visitors to the National September 11 Memorial Museum are confronted, upon arrival, with their own memories, and the collective recall of a day unlike any other.

Continue reading after the jump.

Cook County mulls options for long-abandoned, beaux-arts hospital in Chicago

(Courtesy Chicago Architecture Foundation)

(Courtesy Chicago Architecture Foundation)

Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle briefly took the lectern at the Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) Tuesday night to welcome presentations on the future of an infamous white elephant structure on the city’s near West Side: the old Cook County Hospital building. “We believe that this building has inherent value,” Preckwinkle said, “and that a thoughtful process like this can help unlock that value.” Read More

Maya Lin wins Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize

Architecture, Art, Awards, National
Thursday, October 9, 2014
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Maya Lin. (Courtesy Walter Smith)

Maya Lin. (Courtesy Walter Smith)

Maya Lin has won the 21st annual Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize for her “outstanding and continuing artistic contributions to society and to the beauty of the world,” according to the Gish Prize Trust. The prize, which was created in 1994 through the will of actress Lillian Gish, has a cash award valued at $300,000. Previous winners of the Gish Prize include Bob Dylan, Arthur Miller, Spike Lee, and Frank Gehry.

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Biker’s Tan: Citi Bike system opens in Miami next month

East, Transportation, Urbanism
Thursday, October 9, 2014
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Citi Bike Miami. (Courtesy ciitbikemiami.com)

Citi Bike Miami. (Courtesy ciitbikemiami.com)

By now, you probably know about Citi Bike‘s woes in New York City: the damaged equipment, the broken seats, and—what else?—oh, right the money problems. But with a bailout reportedly imminent, and expansion likely next year, things are starting to looking up for the bike share system. And that’s not all—the blue bikes aren’t just expanding around New York, they’re headed down to the palm tree-lined streets of Miami as well.

Read More

Could NFL’s Plans Sink LA’s Convention Center Competition?

West
Thursday, October 9, 2014
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LA_Coex_02

Populous Convention Center. (Courtesy Populous)

While the Los Angeles Bureau of Engineering moves ahead with its competition for a $350 million renovation and expansion of the Los Angeles Convention Center, the NFL is threatening to make those plans obsolete. According to NBC Sports, a league source has confirmed that the NFL will send one or even two teams back to LA within the next one to two years. Two favorites include the St. Louis Rams and the Oakland Raiders. If the NFL comes to town then AEG’s plans for a new downtown stadium (by Gensler) and convention center expansion (by Populous) may follow. Of course a team could just as easily move to a site being floated near Hollywood Park, in Chavez Ravine, and in City of Industry. As of now the city has shortlisted AC Martin/LMN, Gensler/Lehrer Architects, and HMC/Populous for the convention center. No word from the Bureau of Engineering at this point. Stay tuned as we try to make sense of all this.

Grappling with Glare in High-Performance Facade Design

Portions of Frank Gehry's Walt Disney Concert Hall were sandblasted after construction to reduce glare. (Pedro Szekely / Flickr)

Portions of Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall were sandblasted after construction to reduce glare. (Pedro Szekely / Flickr)

Frank Gehry‘s Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, Scott Johnson‘s Museum Tower in Dallas, and Rafael Viñoly‘s Vrada Hotel & Spa in Las Vegas have at least one thing in common. All three provoked the ire of their neighbors when glare from their reflective facades raised sidewalk temperatures, blinded drivers, or—as in the Museum Tower case—jeopardized the nearby Nasher Sculpture Center’s collections. Glare is increasingly a problem in facade design, says Curtainwall Design Consulting president Charles Clift, in part because of the tools contemporary architects have at their disposal. “The conclusion I came to is that the digital age of architecture has allowed designers to create anything they can imagine, but with that comes some unintended consequences.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Winners announced in vision42design competition to redesign New York’s 42nd Street

Awards, East, Transportation, Urbanism
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
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(Courtesy vision42design)

(Courtesy vision42design)

The 7 member vision42design jury met on October 3 and spent the day looking at nearly 200 digital design proposals to transform New York City’s 42nd Street. They easily decided on a list of ten projects that they considered the most outstanding. In a more contested second round of discussions, the jury was able to narrow these projects to a short list of three professional projects and a student-designed project to move onto the second round of the competition.

Read More

Docomomo considers the future of mid-century architecture in tour series

National, Newsletter
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
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Pavilion for Japanese Art at LACMA. (Brant Brogan)

Pavilion for Japanese Art at LACMA. (Brant Brogan)

October has become the month of architecture tours in cities all across the country. The largest and most ambitious of these tour programs is Docomomo’s Tour Day that takes place throughout the month but primarily on October 11. Docomomo will sponsor or organize architecture tours in nearly half the states in the country, and in 37 different cities. This years theme is “The Future of Mid-Century” and it looks into current issues facing modern architecture today and highlights the innovative and progressive work of architects, designers, and typologies not usually recognized within the scope of mid-century design.

Read More

Pictorial> Take a tour of Paul Rudolph’s only house in Detroit

Architecture, Midwest
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
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(Michelle & Chris Gerard)

(Michelle & Chris Gerard)

Today, AN reported on Detroit’s lone house designed by architect Paul Rudolph called the Parcells House. According to our article, “The waterfront home faces Lake Saint Clair and was designed to give waterfront views to almost every room. As the home sits on a lot at the end of a cul-de-sac where heavy plantings and trees cover the driveway and maintain privacy, it is, for the most part, only viewable by boat.” Check out a slideshow of the inside and outside of the house below and be sure to learn more about the property, currently on the market, over here.

View the slideshow after the jump.

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