Can the latest plan to salvage LaGuardia take flight? New York Governor Cuomo unveils ambitious $4 billion airport redesign scheme

(Courtesy Office of the Governor)

(Courtesy Office of the Governor)

For New Yorkers and visitors alike, LaGuardia Airport is a confusing maze of disconnected terminals. Beset with delays, chaotic transfers, poorly designed wayfinding, and congestion for both passengers and planes, the airport was recently, not undeservingly, characterized by Vice President Biden as feeling like a “third-world country.” Now the facility is slated to get a much-needed, and long overdue redesign. Governor Cuomo presented a far-reaching plan to overhaul the tired facility, which would cost roughly $4 billion, and be completed over a 5-year period.

Continue reading after the jump.

Cincinnati’s U.S. Bank Arena unveils major overhaul and expansion to stay relevant amid regional competition

U.S. Bank Arena concept. (MSA Sport)

U.S. Bank Arena concept. (MSA Sport)

A major renovation and expansion project planned for Cincinnati‘s U.S. Bank Arena could further change the face of the city’s rapidly evolving riverfront.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Indiana draws conservative ire for $55 million 200th birthday bash and bicentennial plaza by MKSK

Plans for a new fountain at Indiana's Bicentennial Plaza  in Indianapolis. (MKSK Studios)

Plans for a new fountain at Indiana’s Bicentennial Plaza in Indianapolis. (MKSK Studios)

Hoosiers, if you didn’t get a gift for Indiana on the occasion of its 200th birthday next year, don’t fret—state and local governments have pledged tens of millions in infrastructure investments and new buildings for the Bicentennial. The state’s share carries a total value of more than $55 million, inviting criticism from fiscal conservatives.

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Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel floats ordinance to fast-track transit-oriented development, reduce parking minimums

Currently under construction, 2211 N. Milwaukee Ave. is one of several TOD projects planned near Chicago transit stations. (Brininstool + Lynch)

Currently under construction, 2211 N. Milwaukee Ave. is one of several TOD projects planned near Chicago transit stations. (Brininstool + Lynch)

This week Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel will push a plan to expand transit-oriented development (TOD) by easing zoning restrictions and releasing certain projects from parking requirements altogether.

Continue reading after the jump.

The United States Olympic Committee drops Boston’s bid to host 2024 games

Development, East, News
Monday, July 27, 2015
.
(Courtesy Boston2024)

(Courtesy Boston2024)

Boston‘s plans to build the most walkable Olympic Games in history will not come to fruition. On Monday, the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) and Boston 2024 jointly announced that they were dropping the city’s bid to host the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Continue reading after the jump.

Navy Pier’s new “Wave Wall” by nArchitects lays a modern Spanish Steps at the foot of a Ferris wheel

Navy Pier's new "Wave Wall" (nARCHITECTS)

Navy Pier’s new “Wave Wall” (nARCHITECTS)

Navy Pier is three years into a $278 million overhaul, and the new face of Illinois’ most visited tourist attraction is beginning to emerge—most recently a grand staircase titled “Wave Wall” washed over the foot of the pier’s famous ferris wheel.

COntinue reading after the jump.

nARCHITECTS reveals Café Pavilion for Cleveland’s revamped Public Square

Rendering of a new cafe pavilion for Cleveland's Public Square. (nARCHITECTS via James Corner Field Operations)

Rendering of a new cafe pavilion for Cleveland’s Public Square. (nARCHITECTS via James Corner Field Operations)

New renderings for one of the largest public space projects in the Midwest have been revealed, showing a new 2,500-square-foot “Café Pavilion” in Cleveland’s Public Square. Read More

Video> Shum Yip Land’s Peter Kok on green skyscrapers and keeping East Asia’s skylines unique

Shum Yip Upperhills in Shenzhen, China (© Shum Yip Land via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat)

Shum Yip Upperhills in Shenzhen, China (© Shum Yip Land via Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat)

This Fall, I served as special media correspondent for the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat‘s September symposium in Shanghai. The topic was “Future Cities: Towards Sustainable Vertical Urbanism,” and among the many architects, engineers and other tall building types I interviewed was Peter Kok, associate general manager of Shum Yip Land, the commercial property arm of Shenzhen Investment. Read More

BREAKING> Days after announcing its approval, Japanese government decides to drop Zaha Hadid’s Tokyo Stadium

(Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

(Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

Just days after giving the go-ahead on Zaha Hadid’s hotly contested designs for the Tokyo Stadium, the Japanese government has retracted its stance. With spiraling costs at the heart of contentions, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said the project would now “start over from zero.”

Continue reading after the jump.

End of the single family house? An upzoned Seattle promises more affordable housing

Photo by Seth Sawyers via Flickr Creative Commons.

(Seth Sawyers via Flickr Creative Commons)

Seattle is abuzz about zoning. Last week, The Seattle Times leaked a draft report produced by Mayor Ed Murray’s housing task force, a 28-member committee steering the Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA).

While the report outlines a variety of strategies to increase affordable housing in the Seattle region, one bold recommendation is getting a lot of attention: the upzoning of single family housing in Seattle to multi-family housing. Read More

Gallery> University of Chicago and Kliment Halsband Architects breathe new life into an old seminary building

(Tom Rossiter)

(Tom Rossiter)

Like many large research universities, the University of Chicago appears to always be building. One mainstay of campus construction is rehabs of existing institutional buildings. At the University of Chicago, that means figuring out what to do with a large stock of neo-Gothic buildings that once served as places of worship.

Continue reading after the jump.

Video> Historic hotel demolished to clear way for Detroit’s new Red Wings hockey arena

The abandoned Hotel Eddystone (left) and Park Avenue Hotel (right), near the Masonic Temple; Midtown Detroit. (Aidan Wakely-Mulroney via Flickr)

The abandoned Hotel Eddystone (left) and Park Avenue Hotel (right), near the Masonic Temple; Midtown Detroit. (Aidan Wakely-Mulroney via Flickr)

The implosion of an historic Detroit hotel on Saturday helped clear the way for a $650 million hockey arena that developers say will more than pay for itself in economic ripple effects, but critics see the demolition as the latest casualty of an ill-conceived scheme receiving public financing.

Continue reading after the jump.

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