Boomtown: Houston poised to overtake Chicago as country’s third-largest city by 2025

Downtown Houston. (eflon / Wikimedia Commons)

Downtown Houston. (eflon / Wikimedia Commons)

The Texas metropolis of Houston is famous (or perhaps infamous) for its sprawling footprint. But as recent census numbers affirm, that growth reflects more than just a lack of zoning—within 10 years, more people will live in Houston than Chicago, according to information from health departments in Illinois and Texas. (Read AN‘s feature examining Houston’s first General Plan here.)

Continue reading after the jump.

California studying a highway-topping wildlife bridge to keep cougars out of traffic

Environment, Transportation, Urbanism, West
Monday, September 14, 2015
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Proposed wildlife crossing infrastructure. (Courtesy Resource Conservation District)

Proposed wildlife crossing infrastructure. (Courtesy Resource Conservation District)

A car driving on a section of Interstate 5 just north of Los Angeles struck a mountain lion named P-32 one early morning this past summer. The cat was once of a small population that has been tracked roaming Southern California wilderness areas. The death, while reported as “sad, but unsurprising,” drew attention to the close proximity of these animals. Our transportation and urban infrastructures draw unnatural lines through their natural habitats.

Continue reading after the jump.

Jersey City implementing pioneering 2013 Housing Plan to spur affordability, dense development

Rendering of proposed market rate and affordable housing complex (Courtesy Jersey City Mayor's Office)

Rendering of proposed market rate and affordable housing complex (Courtesy Jersey City Mayor’s Office)

In 2016, Jersey City’s population is set to exceed Newark’s. With an influx of newcomers, city officials have pioneered a tax incentive plan that encourages new development while actively combating segregation by income. While these goals usually conflict, officials are confident that the program, Payment In Lieu of Taxes (PILOT), will meet the needs of all stakeholders.

Continue reading after the jump.

Indiana University Health hires HOK to masterplan medical campus in downtown Indianapolis

Development, Midwest, News, Urbanism
Monday, September 14, 2015
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(HOK)

(HOK)

Healthcare in the Indianapolis area is getting a check-up, as a new masterplan seeks to streamline operations at one of South Central Indiana’s biggest medical institutions.

More after the jump.

In Indianapolis, turning a new leaf for lending libraries

Art, Midwest, News, Urbanism
Wednesday, September 9, 2015
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The Monument Circle station of Indianapolis' new literacy and public art installation, "The Public Collection." (Indianapolis Public Library)

The Monument Circle station of Indianapolis’ new literacy and public art installation, “The Public Collection.” (Indianapolis Public Library)

Usually the purview of quirky street side kiosks and grassroots neighborhood organizations, book sharing stations have sprouted across Indianapolis with a major assist from the local public library system.

Continue reading after the jump.

Atlanta plans to combat food deserts by hiring its first Urban Agriculture Director

Urban farming in Atlanta (Courtesy UGA College of Agriculture and Environmental Science)

Urban farming in Atlanta (Courtesy UGA College of Agriculture and Environmental Science)

Atlanta has staked a commitment on urban agriculture. The city is poised to hire its first Urban Agriculture Director this fall. Conceived by the office of Mayor Kasim Reed, the position is part of a strategy to eliminate food deserts in south and west Atlanta by promoting agriculture within the city limits.

Continue after the jump.

Neighbors give mixed feedback on pedestrian plazas near Penn Station

Vornado Realty Trust's PLAZA33 features S-Man, 1987 by Keith Haring. (Courtesy NYCDOT)

Vornado Realty Trust’s PLAZA33 features S-Man, 1987 by Keith Haring. (Courtesy NYCDOT)

Community Board 5 is experimenting with a temporary pedestrian plaza and sidewalk expansion around Penn Station to manage foot traffic around one of the busiest rail stations in the world. A guiding vision behind these projects is to link Penn Station and Madison Square Garden to the more pleasant Herald Square and Greeley Square area.

Continue reading after the jump.

This mapping tool shows the effects of gentrification and displacement in the Bay Area

City Terrain, Urbanism, West
Tuesday, September 8, 2015
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The MaestraPeace Mural in San Francisco's Mission District, one of the zones most affected by displacement (Courtesy Wally Gobetz)

The Maestra Peace Mural in San Francisco’s Mission District, one of the zones experiencing the most residential displacement (Wally Gobetz / Flickr)

Researchers at UCLA and the UC-Berkeley are mapping neighborhood change in the Bay Area. The Urban Displacement Project uses government housing, land use, transportation, and Census data from 1990–2013 to find markers that represent turnover in housing, demographic shifts, and new investment.

Continue reading after the jump.

Critic Alastair Gordon diagnoses Miami with a case of “facade-ism”

Pérez Art Museum Miami. (Flickr / Phillip Pessar)

Pérez Art Museum Miami. (Flickr / Phillip Pessar)

Miami is a place of sunshine and gloss, bronzed bodies and signature cocktails. But for architecture critic and author Alastair Gordon, the underlying dynamics—including the harsh realities of income inequality and rising sea levels—are what make the city truly interesting.

Continue reading after the jump.

NBBJ’s New Orleans hospital embodies resilience

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NBBJ designed UMC's entry pavilion to recall New Orleans' porch culture. (Sean Airhart)

NBBJ designed UMC’s entry pavilion to recall New Orleans’ porch culture. (Sean Airhart)

High performance and cultural relevance meet in concrete, metal, and steel mesh envelope.

For the stakeholders involved in building the new Rev. Avery C. Alexander Academic Research Hospital (also known as University Medical Center, or UMC) in downtown New Orleans, the project was about much more than replacing facilities damaged during Hurricane Katrina.

Continue reading after the jump.

Exclusive Video> Paddle along with Jeanne Gang as she kayaks the Chicago River

Paddling along the North Branch. (The Architect's Newspaper)

Paddling along the North Branch. (The Architect’s Newspaper)

If you start at Studio Gang’s acclaimed Aqua Tower and follow the Chicago River about six miles north you will find yourself at another eye-catching building by the increasingly in-demand firm. The WMS Boathouse at Clark Park, completed in 2013, sits along the very polluted north branch of the river and has a dramatic profile inspired by the rhythm of rowers’ oars. (The building is named for the gaming technology company that contributed to the project and has offices directly across the river.)

Watch the video after the jump.

The New & Old in New Orleans: Ten years after Katrina, architects still figuring out how to rebuild housing in the city

Architecture, Development, Southwest, Urbanism
Thursday, September 3, 2015
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(Courtesy Make It Right Foundation)

(Courtesy Make It Right Foundation)

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina tore through the Gulf Coast region, inundating New Orleans with contaminated floodwaters, the city is in some ways still getting back on its feet. After much dispute on how to recover the city, architects and developers are looking to new construction and existing building stock for solutions.

Continue reading after the jump.

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