New York City to receive $176 million in federal funding for East Side coastal resiliency project

Rendering of the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project. (Courtesy City of New York)

Rendering of the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project. (Courtesy City of New York)

New York City will receive $176 million in federal funding for disaster recovery. The funding would be put towards a section of the project extending from the northern portion of Battery Park City to Montgomery Street on the Lower East Side.

More after the jump.

Architects turn to the sea with real proposals for subaquatic living

FLOATING CITY BY AT DESIGN. (COURTESY AT DESIGN)

FLOATING CITY BY AT DESIGN. (COURTESY AT DESIGN)

Sub-aquatic colonization is as alien as inhabiting Mars, yet both topics trend in the design world. Some designers believe residing in the deep sea would resolve crises over food, energy, water, and carbon dioxide. Here are six proposals for subaquatic cities, some of which are being realized, despite resembling post-apocalyptic films.

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Governor Cuomo unveils ambitious plans to overhaul New York’s Penn Station

City Terrain, East, News, Urbanism
Friday, January 8, 2016
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(Courtesy NYS Governor's Office)

Aerial view of the Empire State Complex (Courtesy NYS Governor’s Office)

The lead-up to New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo‘s State of the State address feels like a government-backed encore of “The Twelve Days of Christmas.” Instead of lords a-leaping and swans a-swimming, Cuomo brings infrastructure upgrades a-plenty in his 2016 Agenda.

The governor promised funds to the Gateway and East Side Access tunnels, the Javits Center, new Metro-North stations in the Bronx, the MTA (wi-fi a-comin’!), and an airport on Long Island. Arguably the biggest proposal is the Empire State Complex, a $3 billion redevelopment of New York City’s Penn Station and its surroundings.

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How Salt Lake City might add buildings in the medians of its extra-wide streets

(Courtesy Kentlands Initiative)

(Courtesy Kentlands Initiative)

Over the course of four years, the Granary District of Salt Lake City has been trialling “median development” whereby pop-up shows, stands, and other forms of temporary architecture exist literally in the middle of the street. Now, James Alfandre, director of the Kentlands Initiative, proposes something more concrete.

Continue reading after the jump.

This recycling artist gives dead trees new life in the most popular borough for dead New Yorkers

Art, East, On View, Urbanism
Tuesday, January 5, 2016
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#suspendedforest (banana999 / Instagram)

#suspendedforest (banana999 / Instagram)

The holidays are here when the Coniferous Tree Exception kicks in. This New York City ordinance allows dead pine trees to be sold on city sidewalks in the weeks leading up to Christmas. One true marker of the season’s end is the Christmas trees that line those same sidewalks in January, awaiting DSNY pickup.

In years past, one artist has revivified these trees, albeit illegally, creating semi-real pine forests from discarded trees in marginal urban spaces. This year, the trees will have a second chance at life in the most popular place for dead New Yorkers: Queens.

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Vince Bertoni nominated to lead Los Angeles’ planning department

A new planner in town: Vince Bertoni, at a town hall meeting last September (Eddie Rivera/ Courtesy Pasadena News Now)

A new planner in town: Vince Bertoni, at a town hall meeting last September. (Eddie Rivera/ Courtesy Pasadena News Now)

At the top of the year, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti kicked off 2016 by putting his attention toward the future of L.A.’s physical shape as he nominated Pasadena Planning Director Vince Bertoni as the new head of the Los Angeles Department of City Planning (LADCP).

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In the Bronx, delays seem interminable for long-anticipated Roberto Clemete Plaza

(Courtesy Garrison Architects)

(Courtesy Garrison Architects)

“The Hub,” in the Bronx neighborhood of Mott Haven, couldn’t be better named: it’s the center of commercial activity in the South Bronx, and one of the busiest intersections in the city. As its dense avenues are packed with shoppers and commuters, the city moved to expand and improve Roberto Clemente Plaza, a public space that’s a respite from the hectic nearby streets. Read More

AIA Chicago outlines Pullman’s future as a National Monument

Night view of historic Pullman Sleeping Car Factory by night. Image Courtesy Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

Proposed night view of historic Pullman sleeping car factory. (Image Courtesy Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture)

As part of the ongoing preservation efforts surrounding the South Side Chicago neighborhood of Pullman a print and online book has been released reporting the results of a workshop conducted by AIA Chicago and the National Parks Conservation Association (NPCA) in April 2015. Positioning Pullman gives a history as well as a possible way forward for the once flourishing company neighborhood, which has recently been designated a national monument by President Barack Obama.

Continue reading after the jump.

To reduce their carbon footprint, four European cities introduce drastic traffic regulation plans

MADRID TRAFFIC. (DAVIDE ZANCHETTIN // FLICKR)

Traffic in Madrid. (Davide Zanchettin / Flickr)

Amidst the COP21 UN Climate Change Conference, numerous cities announced questionably large goals to reduce carbon emissions. However, Oslo, Stockholm, Amsterdam, and Madrid, have backed their goals with concrete plans for extreme traffic regulation, ranging from a car-free city center in Oslo to free public transportation in Madrid.

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With LinkNYC, New York City says goodbye payphones, hello free wi-fi

City Terrain, East, News, Urbanism
Tuesday, December 29, 2015
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(intersection_co / Instagram)

(intersection_co / Instagram)

It is the beginning of the end for New York City’s ubiquitous public payphones. This morning, one of the City’s first public Wi-Fi hubs was installed near Manhattan’s Union Square as part of the LinkNYC initiative, through which 10,000 “Links,” or kiosks, will be installed across all five boroughs. Read More

See how a pipe organ played by waves transformed Zadar’s concrete shoreline into a popular public space

SEA ORGAN (LINSSIMATO FLICKR)

Sea Organ (linssimato / Flickr)

During World War II, Allied bombing almost entirely destroyed Zadar, Croatia, 3,000-year-old city on the coast of the Adriatic Sea. Redevelopment introduced a long, concrete shoreline—unpopulated and uninviting, until 2005, when Croatian architect Nikola Bašić installed Sea Organ.

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Remember the Triangle Fire Coalition gets $1.5 million state grant to build Richard Joon Yoo– and Uri Wegman–designed memorial

Design, East, News, Urbanism
Wednesday, December 23, 2015
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Richard Joon Yoo and Uri Wegman's winning memorial design (Courtesy Remember the Triangle Fire)

Rendering of Richard Joon Yoo and Uri Wegman’s winning memorial design (Courtesy Remember the Triangle Fire)

This year marks the 104th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, one of the most lethal industrial disasters in the United States. To the shock and delight of labor activists and descendants of workers who died in the fire, New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo announced yesterday that the state would provide a $1.5 million grant to Remember the Triangle Fire Coalition (RTFC) to build a memorial at 29 Washington Place, the site of the former factory.

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