Plans emerge for the world’s first electricity-generating tidal lagoon—and it will cost a hefty $1.5 billion

(Courtesy FaulknerBrowns)

(Courtesy FaulknerBrowns Architects)

UK developer Tidal Lagoon Power has lodged a proposal to create the world’s first electricity-generating tidal lagoon. Demanding a budget of over $1.5 billion, the Swansea Tidal Lagoon is slated to generate clean, renewable energy for 155,000 homes for up to 120 years.

More after the jump.

Think you can design a high-speed mass transit Hyperloop prototype for Elon Musk?

(Courtesy Hyperloop Transport Technologies)

(Courtesy Hyperloop Transport Technologies)

Tesla Motors founder Elon Musk generated brouhaha in 2013 when he proposed a high-speed mass transit system that could travel at just under the speed of sound.

“It’s a cross between a Concorde, a railgun, and an air hockey table,” Musk wrote in a white paper on the so-called Hyperloop, in which he conjectured a reduced-pressure tube design for transporting humans and freight between San Francisco and Los Angeles in just 35 minutes.

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Atlanta may be getting a nine-acre highway capping park

(Courtesy Jacobs)

(Courtesy Jacobs)

Atlanta, Georgia’s Buckhead Community Improvement District is forging ahead with a proposal to cap the GA 400 highway with a nine-acre park that could potentially double or triple the value of surrounding neighborhoods. Spanning one third of a mile, the floating park will connect Lenox and Peachtree roads, two arterial roadways, and cap the highway and MARTA line while providing access to the Buckhead Station. Currently in the feasibility stage, the park is being designed by local firm GreenRock Partnership and global engineering giant Jacobs.

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Every year, a community in Peru rebuilds this 230-foot suspension bridge out of local grasses

(Courtesy National Museum of the American Indian)

(Courtesy National Museum of the American Indian)

Every year, one of the world’s most tensile rope suspension bridges—straddling a 230-foot-wide canyon in Peru—is handwoven from dried grass. In deference to elemental wear-and-tear, the bridge is painstakingly reconstructed every year by Quechua-speaking communities on either side of the chasm in a ceremonial ritual lasting three days, always ending in song and dance.

Watch the video after the jump.

Take a tour of Chicago’s newest Green Line stop, Cermak-McCormick Place, designed by Ross Barney Architects

Cermak-McCormick Place: the newest stop on Chicago's CTA Green Line, designed by Ross Barney Architects. (Kate Joyce Studios)

Cermak-McCormick Place: the newest stop on Chicago’s CTA Green Line, designed by Ross Barney Architects. (Kate Joyce Studios)

Chicago commuters transiting through the South Loop and Chinatown have had a new stop since early this year, when the Chicago Transit Authority opened its newest train stop: Cermak-McCormick Place.

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Ride Chicago’s new elevated park and bike path, The 606, with this time-lapse video

606

Scene along the 606. (Courtesy Steven Vance)

Chicago’s long-awaited bikeway and elevated park, The 606, opened last weekend (on 6/6, no less) to a rush of pedestrians and cyclists who were eager to test out the new 2.7-mile trail after years of planning, design and construction. The public park remains extremely popular in the sunny week following its debut.

More after the jump.

A long-abandoned New York City aqueduct reopens as bike and pedestrian path

At the High Bridge ribbon cutting. (NYC Parks Department)

City officials at the High Bridge ribbon cutting. (NYC Parks Department)

After 45 years, New York City’s oldest standing bridge has been returned to its former glory. On Tuesday, city officials and local advocates cut the ribbon on the newly-revitalized, High Bridge, which stretches 1,450 feet across the Harlem River, from Upper Manhattan to the Bronx.

COntinue reading after the jump.

After planning commission okay, Cleveland is set to install its first pop-up parklet

Plans for Cleveland's first parklet. (Historic Gateway Neighborhood Corp.)

Plans for Cleveland’s first parklet. (Historic Gateway Neighborhood Corp.)

Parklets are coming to Cleveland. The urban planning tool remaking urban streetscapes from Los Angeles to Chicago got a nod from Cleveland’s Planning Commission last week, clearing the way for an outdoor living room to replace a parking space in front of the popular Noodlecat restaurant at 234 Euclid Avenue. Read More

As crucial vote looms, Toronto’s leadership divided over downtown elevated highway removal

The two proposals. (Courtesy City of Toronto)

The two proposals. (Courtesy City of Toronto)

The Toronto City Council will vote on June 21 on whether to remove a one-mile elevated section of the prominent but crumbling Gardiner East Expressway in the city’s downtown. Mayor John Tory wants to rebuild the road, but his staff, including chief city planner Jennifer Keesmaat, are advocating for removing the highway and replacing it with a pedestrian-friendly boulevard. It is unclear what the 45-member council will do. Read More

Chicago beckons pedestrians with Dr. Seussian green and blue dots

The view of Chicago's Lincoln/Wellington/Southport intersection as part of the “Lincoln Hub” traffic calming  and placemaking project, as seen from St. Alphonsus Church. (John Greenfield)

The view of Chicago’s Lincoln/Wellington/Southport intersection as part of the “Lincoln Hub” traffic calming and placemaking project, as seen from St. Alphonsus Church. (John Greenfield)

Who polka dotted West Lakeview? The area around the Lincoln/Wellington/Southport intersection on Chicago‘s North Side looks like a giant game of Twister, as Streetsblog’s John Greenfield points out, thanks to a whimsical, low-tech placemaking initiative that is part of a larger $175,000 streetscape project along Lincoln Avenue. Read More

Plans unveiled for the Red Line Greenway, Cleveland’s answer to The High Line

A rendering of the Red Line Greenway proposal. (Original photo courtesy of Share the River, Rendering by Evan Peterson, LSU Robert Reich School of Landscape Architecture, via The Cleveland Plain Dealer)

A rendering of the Red Line Greenway proposal. (Original photo courtesy of Share the River, Rendering by Evan Peterson, LSU Robert Reich School of Landscape Architecture, via The Cleveland Plain Dealer)

A video released last week gives Clevelanders the clearest picture yet of plans for a greenway beside the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority’s Red Line. The idea has drawn comparisons to New York’s High Line or Chicago’s Bloomingdale Trail (aka The 606). Watch the video after the jump.

This solar-power generating bike lane in the Netherlands wows engineers by producing more juice than expected

(Courtesy SolaRoad)

(Courtesy SolaRoad)

Performance-wise, the Dutch power-generating bike path, SolaRoad, has overshot expectations, generating upwards of 3,000 kilowatts of power in the six months since its launch. The 230-foot concrete strip is located in Krommenie, a village northwest of Amsterdam, and is undergoing a three-year pilot test for material feasibility.

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