21 Winners Chosen for Federal Transit-Oriented Development Planning Grants

City Terrain, National, News, Transportation
Wednesday, September 23, 2015
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(Courtesy DoT)

(Courtesy DOT)

Twenty one planning projects have been awarded over $19 million between them by the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) in a bid to boost transportation infrastructure funding.

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Not a car in the world: Nashville neighborhood abstains from use of cars for a whole week

National, Transportation, Urbanism
Tuesday, September 22, 2015
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(Courtesy Daniel Weir / Flickr)

(Courtesy Daniel Weir / Flickr)

While major cities in Europe and across the world are experimenting with the car-free lifestyle, the American South is not likely on anyone’s radar as the next to embrace the trend. A neighborhood in Nashville, Tennessee, however, has promised to not use cars for an entire week, leaving them at home as part of the “Don’t Car Campaign.”

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Watch giant sushi float down a Japanese river in Osaka

Art, International, Transportation
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
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(Courtesy RollingSushi / Instagram)

(Courtesy RollingSushi / Instagram)

The installation known as Rolling Sushi and part of the Osaka Canvas Project arts festival involves five oversized pieces of sushi floating down a local waterway as if it were the conveyor belt at a local restaurant. All aboard the sushi train?

Continue reading after the jump.

Report: Red tape and deferred maintenance balloon U.S. infrastructure costs to $3.7 trillion

City Terrain, National, News, Transportation
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
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The overhead steel truss on a pair of I-5 bridges spanning the Skookumchuck River in Washington State is one piece of infrastructure getting overdue repairs. Hits from overheight loads will be fixed and the overhead clearance will be straightened out to and even height across all lanes. (Washington State Department of Transportation)

The overhead steel truss on a pair of I-5 bridges spanning the Skookumchuck River in Washington State is one piece of infrastructure getting overdue repairs. Hits from overheight loads will be fixed and the overhead clearance will be straightened out to and even height across all lanes. (Washington State Department of Transportation via Flickr)

A new report attempts to quantify the cost of our national reluctance to fix aging bridges, railroads and power lines. Delays in approving infrastructure projects cost the United States some $3.7 trillion, according to the nonpartisan think tank Common Good—more than twice what it would take to fix the infrastructure in the first place, according to a report titled Two Years, Not Ten Years: Redesigning Infrastructure Approvals.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pictorial> Take a look inside Dattner’s 34th St-Hudson Yards subway station, now open to the public

(Patrick Cashin for MTA / Flickr)

(Patrick Cashin for MTA / Flickr)

On Sunday, September 13th, New York City got its first new subway station in 25 years. Located at 34th Street and Eleventh Avenue, the 34th St-Hudson Yards station extended the 7 train one and a half miles to serve Manhattan’s Far West Side.

See inside the station after the jump.

California studying a highway-topping wildlife bridge to keep cougars out of traffic

Environment, Transportation, Urbanism, West
Monday, September 14, 2015
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Proposed wildlife crossing infrastructure. (Courtesy Resource Conservation District)

Proposed wildlife crossing infrastructure. (Courtesy Resource Conservation District)

A car driving on a section of Interstate 5 just north of Los Angeles struck a mountain lion named P-32 one early morning this past summer. The cat was once of a small population that has been tracked roaming Southern California wilderness areas. The death, while reported as “sad, but unsurprising,” drew attention to the close proximity of these animals. Our transportation and urban infrastructures draw unnatural lines through their natural habitats.

Continue reading after the jump.

Walk this way: Architecture firm NBBJ proposes a moving sidewalk to replace London Underground Circle line

International, Transportation
Friday, September 11, 2015
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Courtesy NBBJ

(Courtesy NBBJ)

Architectural firm NBBJ has proposed a new three-lane moving sidewalk (or for the Brits, a travelator) system to replace 17-miles of the London Underground in a bid to decrease travel times and transport more people around London.

Continue reading after the jump.

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New York state unveils new pedestrian and cyclist bridge now under construction in Upper Manhattan

City Terrain, East, Transportation
Wednesday, September 9, 2015
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The $24.4million proposal is under way. (Courtesy NYDOT)

The $24.4million proposal is under way. (Courtesy NYDOT)

New York State Department of Transportation (NYDOT) Commissioner Matthew J. Driscoll has revealed a $24.4 million bicycle and pedestrian bridge at 151st Street in Manhattan. Crossing the Henry Hudson Parkway and the adjacent Amtrak line, the new bridge will connect West Harlem with the Hudson River Greenway.

Continue reading after the jump.

Watch the first arch of Santiago Calatrava’s Margaret McDermott Bridge get topped off in Dallas

Courtesy Santiago Calatrava

Courtesy Santiago Calatrava

An important milestone for what is set to be Dallas’ newest landmark was just reached as the first arch of Santiago Calatrava‘s Margaret McDermott Bridges project was completed in late August.

More after the jump.

Study shows that Washington, D.C.’s bike-share program is reducing traffic congestion

City Terrain, East, Transportation
Friday, September 4, 2015
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Introduced in London by mayor Boris Johnson, 'Boris Bikes' have been a hit. ( Chris Sampson / Flickr )

Introduced in London by mayor Boris Johnson, ‘Boris Bikes’ have been a hit. (Chris Sampson / Flickr )

Research by Casey J. Wichman for the think tank Resources for the Future (RFF) has found a causal relationship between bike sharing programs and traffic congestion in Washington, D.C.

Continue reading after the jump.

Exclusive Video> Paddle along with Jeanne Gang as she kayaks the Chicago River

Paddling along the North Branch. (The Architect's Newspaper)

Paddling along the North Branch. (The Architect’s Newspaper)

If you start at Studio Gang’s acclaimed Aqua Tower and follow the Chicago River about six miles north you will find yourself at another eye-catching building by the increasingly in-demand firm. The WMS Boathouse at Clark Park, completed in 2013, sits along the very polluted north branch of the river and has a dramatic profile inspired by the rhythm of rowers’ oars. (The building is named for the gaming technology company that contributed to the project and has offices directly across the river.)

Watch the video after the jump.

Signs of life: Artist Steve Powers tacks thought-provoking ‘ICY Signs’ around New York City

(Courtesy New York City Department of Transportation)

(Courtesy New York City Department of Transportation)

Manhattan-based artist Steve Powers is offering a non-caffeinated pick-me-up for weary NYC commuters with his pop art–style street signs mounted on light poles around the city. Bearing food-for-thought slogans with themes of life and love against a pictograph or logotype, such as “I get lost to get found” stamped on a briefcase, the signs are designed to inspire smiles and/or introspection.

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