Watch the first arch of Santiago Calatrava’s Margaret McDermott Bridge get topped off in Dallas

Courtesy Santiago Calatrava

Courtesy Santiago Calatrava

An important milestone for what is set to be Dallas’ newest landmark was just reached as the first arch of Santiago Calatrava‘s Margaret McDermott Bridges project was completed in late August.

More after the jump.

Study shows that Washington, D.C.’s bike-share program is reducing traffic congestion

City Terrain, East, Transportation
Friday, September 4, 2015
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Introduced in London by mayor Boris Johnson, 'Boris Bikes' have been a hit. ( Chris Sampson / Flickr )

Introduced in London by mayor Boris Johnson, ‘Boris Bikes’ have been a hit. (Chris Sampson / Flickr )

Research by Casey J. Wichman for the think tank Resources for the Future (RFF) has found a causal relationship between bike sharing programs and traffic congestion in Washington, D.C.

Continue reading after the jump.

Exclusive Video> Paddle along with Jeanne Gang as she kayaks the Chicago River

Paddling along the North Branch. (The Architect's Newspaper)

Paddling along the North Branch. (The Architect’s Newspaper)

If you start at Studio Gang’s acclaimed Aqua Tower and follow the Chicago River about six miles north you will find yourself at another eye-catching building by the increasingly in-demand firm. The WMS Boathouse at Clark Park, completed in 2013, sits along the very polluted north branch of the river and has a dramatic profile inspired by the rhythm of rowers’ oars. (The building is named for the gaming technology company that contributed to the project and has offices directly across the river.)

Watch the video after the jump.

Signs of life: Artist Steve Powers tacks thought-provoking ‘ICY Signs’ around New York City

(Courtesy New York City Department of Transportation)

(Courtesy New York City Department of Transportation)

Manhattan-based artist Steve Powers is offering a non-caffeinated pick-me-up for weary NYC commuters with his pop art–style street signs mounted on light poles around the city. Bearing food-for-thought slogans with themes of life and love against a pictograph or logotype, such as “I get lost to get found” stamped on a briefcase, the signs are designed to inspire smiles and/or introspection.

Read More

Fernando Romero has a plan to green Mexico City with the Cultural Corridor Chapultepec, a park-like linear thoroughfare

FR-EE's multimodal Cultural Corridor Chapultepec proposal for Mexico City. (Courtesy FR-EE)

Fernando Romero’s multimodal Cultural Corridor Chapultepec proposal for Mexico City. (Courtesy FR-EE)

Avenida Chapultepec in Mexico City began as a road for Aztec emperors. Over the years the broad boulevard, which leads from the old Colonia Centro to Chapultepec Park, hosted an aqueduct and the city’s first electric tram. But the 20th century wasn’t particularly kind to the thoroughfare.

COntinue reading after the jump.

A circular bridge will go up this November over Uruguay’s beautiful Laguna Garzon, connecting two formerly remote shores

(Courtesy Rafael Vinoly Architects)

(Courtesy Rafael Vinoly Architects)

If conservatives bristle at building a bridge over a UNESCO World Heritage Site, just make it circular. This ring-shaped bridge by architect Rafael Viñoly will superimpose the Laguna Garzon, its circular design meant to minimize its environmental and visual impact by recalling a winding road—plus the fact that it uniquely affords veritable 360-degree views.

More after the jump.

UPDATED: Snøhetta and W Architecture does the impossible: It makes the Penn Station area bearable

[Update: While Snøhetta is drawing up the master plan for the area around Penn Station, Brooklyn-based W Architecture and Landscape Architecture, working with Production Glue, designed the new Plaza33.]

Turning the truly miserable blocks around New York City’s Penn Station into a pleasant and calming retreat would appear to be an impossible undertaking. But Vornado Realty Trust—the primary property owner around the station—believes it can do it with the help of some experienced, Norwegian architects. Enter: Snøhetta.

Continue reading after the jump.

This million dollar sculptural Ferris wheel at a Montreal bus stop is stirring questions about cost

(City of Montreal)

(City of Montreal)

A new bus stop in Montreal will include a 64-foot-tall, Ferris Wheel–shaped art installation that cost the city a cool $840,000. For blatantly obvious reasons, many Quebecois aren’t thrilled about that—in no small part because the expensive art project is in a part of Montreal that is struggling to combat poverty.

Continue reading after the jump.

Open data from Transport for London spurs 3D axonometric plans of the Tube so passengers can mentally map their next trip

(Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

(Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Now you can strategize your next rush-hour skedaddle through the labyrinthine London Underground ahead of time—and choose all the right shortcuts. Transport for London (TfL) has released a series of 3D axonometric maps of the world’s oldest tube network, following a Freedom of Information Act (FoIA) request by Londoner Georges Vehres.

View the maps after the jump.

While Google is photographing your street, its cars will also be mapping the air city dwellers breathe

(Courtesy Aclima)

(Courtesy Aclima)

Will we call it Air View? Google is collaborating with San Francisco–based, pollution-tech start-up Aclima to begin assessing air quality in metropolitan areas across the United States. Cars Google uses to capture its popular Street Views have been equipped with Aclima’s environmental sensors and will be able to detect pollutants such as Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Black Carbon.

Continue reading after the jump.

The roster of cities across the world going car-free is growing, joining Paris, Ireland, and Dublin

Rue de Bon Secours, Brussels (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Rue de Bon Secours, Brussels (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

The concept of car-free city centers is fast spreading throughout Europe as increasingly gridlocked thoroughfares render the private car intolerable. Brussels, Belgium, has announced the development of pedestrian boulevards in its city center—with a ban on cars effective from June 29, 2015—where the city will stage recreational and cultural activities throughout the summer.

And plenty more are following suit.

This fake town by the University of Michigan to become testing ground for developing smarter driverless cars

(Courtesy University of Michigan)

(Courtesy University of Michigan)

Researchers the University of Michigan just one-upped a recent virtual SimCity project for testing smart technologies of future cities. A tangible, 32-acre testing ground for driverless cars called MCity pits autonomous vehicles against every conceivable real-life obstacle, minus the caprice of human drivers.

Continue reading after the jump.

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