Theaster Gates opens Stony Island Arts Bank at Chicago Architecture Biennial

Architecture, Art, Midwest, Preservation
Monday, October 5, 2015
.
The main floor of the Stony Island Arts Bank will be used for exhibitions (Steve Hall)

The main floor of the Stony Island Arts Bank will be used for exhibitions, like the current show by Carlos Bunga  (Steve Hall)

If you’re in town for the Chicago Architecture Biennial, be sure to visit the newly-opened Stony Island Arts Bank, a formerly derelict 1923 bank structure on Chicago’s South Side that has been transformed into a spectacular center for exhibitions, artist residencies, and the preservation of archival collections of black culture. The building’s rebirth was made possible by artist Theaster Gates’ Rebuild Foundation, which has renovated three other buildings in the area as part of its program of “culturally driven redevelopment.”

More after the jump.

Performances rule the day at the Chicago Architecture Biennial

We Know How to Order by Bryony Roberts and the South Shore Drill Team (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

We Know How to Order by Bryony Roberts and the South Shore Drill Team (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

Performance has been the breakout surprise of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. While many of the works inside the Chicago Cultural Center grapple with issues of urbanism, politics, and the resonances of Modernism (especially Mies’ oversized presence in the city) in contemporary culture, the three performances included in the opening weekend program address and embody what is at stake. Read More

Archtober Building of the Day 2> New York Hall of Science

(Courtesy Eve Dilworth Rosen)

(Courtesy Eve Dilworth Rosen)

Intrepid Archtober-ites ventured to the site of the 1964-65 World’s Fair to explore a monument of the Space Age. The New York Hall of Science, a 90-foot-high undulating vertical structure designed by Wallace K. Harrison, was meant to create the illusion of floating in deep space. Cobalt glass shards stud the 5,400 coffers in the rippling wall, filtering sunlight into the interior and bathing it in an intense, blue glow.

Read More

Oakland Uber Alles: Gensler unveils new East Bay headquarters for booming ride-share company

Architecture, Development, Other, Preservation, West
Thursday, September 24, 2015
.
Revamped Sears building with facades on both Broadway and Telegraph Avenue. (Steelblue)

Revamped Sears building with facades on both Broadway and Telegraph Avenue. (Steelblue)

Not content with 423,000 square feet designed by SHoP Architects in San Francisco’s Mission Bay, Uber is expanding into Oakland. The company purchased the former Sears building from developer Lane Partners, who bought the building last year. Genlser is on deck to transform the old department store into 330,000 square feet of creative office space. The iconic chunk of real estate prominently faces both Broadway and Telegraph Avenue and its redevelopment marks a turning point for Oakland.

Read More

The White House is up for auction—or at least an old piece of it

East, Preservation
Tuesday, September 22, 2015
.
Where the plinth was used. (Courtesy RRAuction)

Room where the plinth was used. (Courtesy RRAuction)

Here’s your chance to own a piece—a very small piece—of the actual White House. No large lobbyist pockets required. A relic from the presidential mansion will go up for auction at a live event later this month. The piece is an architectural ornament from the main hall of 1817 that President Madison rebuild after an 1814 fire.

Read More

The South Street Seaport fetes its new Cultural District with exhibits curated by James Sanders

Art, Development, East, On View, Preservation
Tuesday, September 22, 2015
.
Teresa Diehl: Breathing Waters, a site specific installation at the South Street Seaport (Audrey Wachs / AN)

Teresa Diehl: Breathing Waters, a site specific installation at the South Street Seaport (Audrey Wachs / AN)

On September 17th, New York artists, architects, and designers gathered in lower Manhattan to celebrate the newly anointed South Street Seaport Culture District.

More after the jump.

Cincinnati Music Hall renovation to begin next year, for late 2017 reopening

(Courtesy 3CDC)

(Courtesy 3CDC)

After nearly a decade in the works, the renovation of Cincinnati’s grand Music Hall has a construction timeline. The $129 million construction project crept along for years, the building languishing while preservationists sought to raise funds for its restoration—even as the fortunes of the surrounding neighborhood of Over-the-Rhine surged.

Continue reading after the jump.

Gluckman Tang’s $24 million renovation of the Staten Island Museum opens after a decade

Architecture, Art, East, Interiors, Preservation
Friday, September 18, 2015
.
(Courtesy Bruce Damonte)

(Courtesy Bruce Damonte)

Ten years in the making, the renovation of one of Staten Island‘s oldest buildings—part of the Staten Island Museum expansion—is finally complete. Well, almost.

Continue reading after the jump.

Architects, preservationists come out in force against bill that would change historic preservation in New York City

Stone-and-Pearl

Manhattan’s Stone Street, one of over 33,000 landmark properties in New York City. (Courtesy Wally Gobetz / Flickr)

New York City Council members Peter A. Koo and David Greenfield introduced a bill in April 2015 that would radically alter the way the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) considers sites for historic preservation. That measure, Intro 775, was debated yesterday in an epic public hearing that lasted more than six hours.  Read More

Heatherwick Studio Bends Glass and Steel for Gin Maker

Brought to you with support from:
facadeplus_logo1

Two dynamic glass and steel buildings connect an ecologically restored waterway with historic buildings in Hampshire, England. (Iwan Baan)

The glasshouses are comprised of 893 unique laminated glass panels framed by over 1.25 km of steel mullions.

Designed by Heatherwick studio and situated on an industrial site of production since 900AD, Bombay Sapphire’s new distilling operations are distributed into a campus of 23 restored buildings, organized around a widened river and central courtyard.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pictorial> Conservation work at New York City’s St. Patrick’s Cathedral is finally (almost) complete

Cleaning the Cathedral's exterior (Courtesy Murphy Burnham & Buttrick)

Cleaning the Cathedral’s exterior (Courtesy Murphy Burnham & Buttrick)

Shrouded in scaffolding for three years, renovations on St. Patrick’s Cathedral are nearly complete. Initiated in 2006, renovations stalled due to the 2007 economic recession, but began again in earnest in 2012. Pope Francis’ upcoming New York visit advanced the project timeline.

Continue reading after the jump.

Plan would surround Poughkeepsie’s long-vacant Hudson River Psychiatric Center with suburban homes, shopping

Architecture, Development, East, News, Preservation
Thursday, September 10, 2015
.
19th century postcard depicting The Kirkbride (Courtesy asylumprojects.org)

19th century postcard depicting The Kirkbride Hudson River State Hospital. (Courtesy Asylum Projects)

The long-vacant Hudson River Psychiatric Center in Poughkeepsie, New York, is poised for redevelopment. The 156-acre hospital complex, listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP), was built in 1871 and closed in 2001. Designed by Frederick Clarke Withers, with a landscape architecture plan by Olmsted & Vaux, the site’s significance derives primarily from the expressive Gothic Revival architecture organized under the Kirkbride Plan. According the NRHP entry, 11 of the buildings on site have particular historic significance.
Continue reading after the jump.

Page 5 of 27« First...34567...1020...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2015 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License