Inch by inch, the Times Square Palace Theater will be raised 29 feet to accommodate added retail

Development, East, News, Preservation
Thursday, December 3, 2015
.
(Courtesy PBDW Architects)

The Palace Theater (Courtesy PBDW Architects)

In any other circumstance, razing a beloved historic building elicits outrage from preservationists. This time, the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) worked the homonym, approving plans to raise the Palace Theater, at the corner of Seventh Avenue and West 47th Street, by 29 feet. New York’s PBDW Architects and historic preservation consultants Higgins Quasebarth & Partners will lead the theater-raising and subsequent renovation. Read More

Annals of Computing: “Silicon City” exhibition at the New York Historical Society questions origins of the digital era

Design, East, Preservation, Technology
Thursday, December 3, 2015
.
Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York. (Courtesy New York Historical Society)

Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York. (Courtesy New York Historical Society)

Radical inventions that lead to profound societal transformations tend to be accompanied by founding myths and overlapping claims for authorship. Once a certain founding story has been widely accepted, research will periodically uncover it as being false, and the evidence for an alternate narrative will emerge.

Trying to change accepted founding myths is notoriously difficult: Gutenberg built his printing press after centuries of development in printmaking across the world, but his name is strongly tied to the advent of the printing revolution. Importantly, the significance of a figure like Gutenberg and the related story becomes a point of local pride.

Continue reading after the jump.

Here’s how a phone booth on the side of a highway in Arkansas landed on the National Register of Historic Places

Midwest, News, Preservation
Tuesday, November 24, 2015
.
An Airlight phone booth in Kelley, Iowa (Courtesy Phone Booth In Kelley Iowa / Facebook)

An Airlight phone booth in Kelley, Iowa. (Courtesy Phone Booth In Kelley Iowa / Facebook)

It’s no TARDIS, but the Prairie Grove, Arkansas, Airlight telephone booth, on U.S. 62 in front of the Colonial Motel, has defied cell phones and a near fatal encounter with a runaway SUV to become the first phone booth listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Continue after the jump.

The long history of a tall sidewalk: How elevated skywalks have failed cities in the United States

Minneapolis-Skyways

The Minneapolis Skyway system near IDS in 1980 (City of Minneapolis Archives)

Skywalks, or elevated sidewalks, continually resurface as an urban solution to alleviate pedestrian traffic, provide additional retail space, and offer a safe alternative to sharing space with automobiles. However, each time a skywalk is actually realized, problems abound.

Continue reading after the jump.

Why critics are skeptical of renovations bringing eternal youth to Chartres Cathedral

OLD AND NEW AT CHARTRES CATHEDRAL. (COURTESY LAWRENCE OP, FLICKR)

OLD AND NEW AT CHARTRES CATHEDRAL. (COURTESY LAWRENCE OP FLICKR)

In 2009, the French Ministry of Culture began an $18 million restoration of the medieval Chartres Cathedral, a UNESCO World Heritage Site 50 miles southwest of Paris. By 2017, the Gothic structure is intended to look similar to the original 1194–1250 construction. However, as the past 765 years  of dirt and grime are erased, critics are denouncing the project.

Read More

Fight over how to use Maybeck’s Palace of Fine Arts reflects San Francisco tensions

palace

1930 postcard of the Palace of Fine Arts designed by Bernard Maybeck. (Boston Public Library/ Flickr)

A battle is brewing in San Francisco’s Marina District over the fate of the Palace of Fine Arts rotunda and the adjacent structure that formerly housed the Exploratorium.
Read More

How a Frank Lloyd Wright house built in New Jersey ended up in Arkansas

Bachman-Wilson House Exterior. (Courtesy Nancy Nolan Photography)

Bachman-Wilson House Exterior. (Courtesy Nancy Nolan Photography)

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Bachman Wilson House, built in 1956 in Millstone, New Jersey, opened to the public on November 11th in Bentonville, Arkansas. The house was disassembled on the original site and transported to the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, for preservation and public display.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Matter, Light, and Form: Architectural Photographs of Wayne Thom, 1968–2003

Architecture, On View, Preservation, West
Wednesday, November 11, 2015
.
Denver Art Museum (Wayne Thom)

Denver Art Museum (Wayne Thom)

Matter, Light, and Form: Architectural Photographs of Wayne Thom, 1968-2003
WUHO Gallery
6518 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles
Through December 20, 2015

Best known for his keen documentation of Late Modernism, Wayne Thom’s architectural photography brings drama and beauty to a period marked by corporate and developer-driven design. Now, the Julius Shulman Institute at Woodbury University presents an exhibition of Thom’s work at the WUHO Gallery in Hollywood.

View a gallery of Thom’s work after the jump.

Breaking> Federal Court Pumps Brakes on Lucas Museum

The plan calls for a mix of greenery and hardscape to complement a stoic facade originally slated to be masonry.

The embattled Lucas Museum of Narrative Arts planned for the Chicago Lakefront will now have to wait at least until February to know its fate.

Just two weeks after the city of Chicago gave the go ahead for the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art to procure a 99 year lease on the Chicago Lakefront from the Chicago Park District, a federal court has indicated that it will not give a decision until February regarding a case brought by Friends of the Parks against the City.

Read More

New York state parks to see a billion dollar influx of maintenance funding by 2020

City Terrain, East, News, Preservation
Friday, November 6, 2015
.
Letchworth State Park (Rayhan A)

Letchworth State Park (Rayhan A)

After years of disinvestment, the New York park system is receiving the funding it needs to address more than a billion dollars of neglected maintenance across the state’s 213 parks and historic sites.

Continue after the jump.

Ocean Liner S.S. United States may dock in Red Hook after ship-shape conversion

Rendering of the proposed S.S. United States conversion (Courtesy GBX)

Rendering of the proposed S.S. United States conversion (Courtesy GBX)

New York City has 520 miles of coastline. The city’s coastline-to-swanky-offshore-vessel ratio, however, is seriously skewed. Although New Yorkers may enjoy drinks on the Frying Pan, at Chelsea Piers, or visit the oil tanker cultural center aboard the Mary A. Whalen, in Red Hook, there is certainly room for another moldering boat-turned-modern-recreation-and-entertainment-space. Read More

Finding Asylum: Tracing the evolution of five Kirkbride Planned hospitals for the insane

The elegant rooftop of the Danvers State Hospital in Massachusetts. (Christopher Payne)

The elegant rooftop of the Danvers State Hospital in Massachusetts. (Christopher Payne)

The Victorian-era psychologist Thomas Story Kirkbride advocated the use of fresh air and elegant architecture for healing mental illnesses. Under the Kirkbride Plan for asylums, patients resided in extensive, well-landscaped grounds and palace-like structures. Yet inside, unplanned by the architects, patients often were restrained in chains and dark dungeons and suffered ice-water baths.

Continue reading after the jump.

Page 3 of 2712345...1020...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2015 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License