Gehry wades into LA River master plan, stirring up ripples of praise and dissent

(KCET Departures / Flickr)

(KCET Departures / Flickr)

On Friday, the Los Angeles Times scooped the city and made public news that Frank Gehry had met with Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti and the nonprofit LA River Revitalization Corp., and that Gehry Partners was working on a master plan for the 51-mile long, mostly-concrete waterway.

Continue reading after the jump.

Arquitectonica’s newly opened zig-zagging tower in Miami is meant to reflect the rippling waters of Biscayne Bay

(Courtesy Arquitectonica)

(Courtesy Arquitectonica)

Miami-based Arquitectonica has completed a zig-zagging tower on booming Miami’s Biscayne Bay. The 42-story, luxury residence building was developed by the Related Group and has been dubbed the Icon Bay.

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An expanse of sustainable timber just clinched the Chicago Architecture Biennial’s Lakefront Kiosk Competition

Chicago Architecture Biennial officials today announced "Chicago Horizon" by Ultramoderne as the winner of the inaugural design festival's Lakefront Kiosk Competition. (Ultramoderne)

Chicago Architecture Biennial officials today announced “Chicago Horizon” by Ultramoderne as the winner of the inaugural design festival’s Lakefront Kiosk Competition. (Ultramoderne)

Officials with the Chicago Architecture Biennial today announced the winners of the Lakefront Kiosk Competition, choosing a team whose stated goal was “to build the largest flat wood roof possible.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Pictorial> Minnesota opens first public monument dedicated to military families

The Minnesota Military Family Tribute opened this summer.  (George Heinrich)

The Minnesota Military Family Tribute opened this summer. (George Heinrich)

After four years in the making, St. Paul, Minnesota earlier this year opened a new tribute to the military families—the first monument aimed directly at the family members of those in the armed forces, as opposed to the service men and women themselves.

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Indiana draws conservative ire for $55 million 200th birthday bash and bicentennial plaza by MKSK

Plans for a new fountain at Indiana's Bicentennial Plaza  in Indianapolis. (MKSK Studios)

Plans for a new fountain at Indiana’s Bicentennial Plaza in Indianapolis. (MKSK Studios)

Hoosiers, if you didn’t get a gift for Indiana on the occasion of its 200th birthday next year, don’t fret—state and local governments have pledged tens of millions in infrastructure investments and new buildings for the Bicentennial. The state’s share carries a total value of more than $55 million, inviting criticism from fiscal conservatives.

Continue reading after the jump.

How architects are building a “soil sandwich” to keep plants from cooking at Hudson Yards’ rail-yard-topping Public Square

The 7 train station and green space with the Public Square behind it. (Courtesy Related and Oxford)

The 7 train station and green space with the Public Square behind it. (Courtesy Related and Oxford)

Building America’s largest private real estate development in history would be a tricky proposition whether or not it was taking shape over an active rail yard in the middle of the densest city in the country. But, of course, that is exactly where Hudson Yards—the mega development with those superlative bragging rights—is taking shape.

Continue reading after the jump.

Navy Pier’s new “Wave Wall” by nArchitects lays a modern Spanish Steps at the foot of a Ferris wheel

Navy Pier's new "Wave Wall" (nARCHITECTS)

Navy Pier’s new “Wave Wall” (nARCHITECTS)

Navy Pier is three years into a $278 million overhaul, and the new face of Illinois’ most visited tourist attraction is beginning to emerge—most recently a grand staircase titled “Wave Wall” washed over the foot of the pier’s famous ferris wheel.

COntinue reading after the jump.

In Beirut, a group of activists seeks to protect a coastal area by setting up a grassroots design ideas competition

The Dalieh of Raouche. (Christian Sowa)

The Dalieh of Raouche. (Christian Sowa)

In the last two decades, Beirut’s real estate market boomed and transformed the city. One of the yet non-developed areas of the city is a coastal area called Dalieh. Despite the fact that this area is privately owned, it was used as an openly accessible space by the public for years. However, recent development plans, aiming to build a high-end real estate complex, would largely change the open access and current character of this space.

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nARCHITECTS reveals Café Pavilion for Cleveland’s revamped Public Square

Rendering of a new cafe pavilion for Cleveland's Public Square. (nARCHITECTS via James Corner Field Operations)

Rendering of a new cafe pavilion for Cleveland’s Public Square. (nARCHITECTS via James Corner Field Operations)

New renderings for one of the largest public space projects in the Midwest have been revealed, showing a new 2,500-square-foot “Café Pavilion” in Cleveland’s Public Square. Read More

James Corner Field Operations unveils initial plans for The Underline, a 10-mile linear park in Miami

Dadeland Trail Connection. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

Dadeland Trail Connection. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

It has become common fair to refer to any and all rails-to-trails project as a certain city’s “High Line. ” (Yup, we’ve been guilty of that too.) The ubiquitous High Line comparison might be flattering, but it’s obviously too simplistic. It glosses over site-specific details and rings a bit too New York–centric.

More after the jump.

The Miller Hull Partnership expands Seattle’s Pike Place Market

A steel and glass canopy shelters new craft and farm stalls. (The Miller Hull Partnership)

A steel and glass canopy shelters new craft and farm stalls. (The Miller Hull Partnership)

Work is underway on MarketFront, a multi-level extension of Seattle’s Pike Place Market designed by The Miller Hull Partnership. The project broke ground in late June after an extensive community and city process. At stake is the question: How do you create an addition for an icon? Read More

Here’s how Amsterdam built an archipelago to solve its housing crunch

(Courtesy Amsterdam)

The islands of Ijburg, with Center Island jutting out to the right (Courtesy Amsterdam)

Amsterdam’s overflow population will soon have a roof over its head—and artificial sand bars beneath its feet. Europe’s boldest engineering and housing program yet proposes a series of artificial islands built over Ijmeer Lake, with shoreline houses occupying sand bars made using a so-called “pancake method.”

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