Pier into the future: Tribeca’s Pier 26 to get an OLIN landscape and a Rafael Viñoly–designed science center

Pier 26 (Courtesy Hudson River Park Trust)

Pier 26 (Courtesy Hudson River Park Trust)

Citibank announced on Friday that it will donate $10 million t0 the Hudson River Park Trust (HRPT) for the renovation of Tribeca’s Pier 26. For Citi, it’s a sweet quid pro quo: the river pier is adjacent to Citi’s soon-to-be global headquarters at 388–390 Greenwich Street. Philadelphia-based OLIN will lead the park’s design team. Rafael Viñoly will work pro bono to design a research and science education center for the site.

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Archtober Building of the Day 11> Pier 2 at Brooklyn Bridge Park

(Archie Srinivasan)

(Archie Srinivasan)

Pier 2 at Brooklyn Bridge Park
150 Furman Street, Brooklyn
Maryann Thompson Architects

It was a perfect day for Archtober-ites to walk onto Pier 2 at Brooklyn Bridge Park and engage in an enlightening tour of its creation, from concept to completion. Kait Kurs from Maryann Thompson Architects began at the entrance—the threshold that separates the big city and pier. It is what makes Pier 2 an island of recreation that includes playgrounds, picnic areas, an inline skating rink, and courts for basketball, handball, bocce, and tetherball. Essentially, it is a “toy box” for the larger park.

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Archtober Building of the Day 8> The NYCHA Red Hook West Urban Farm

(Courtesy Center for Architecture)

(Courtesy Center for Architecture)

The NYCHA Red Hook West Urban Farm
6 Wolcott Street, Brooklyn

thread collective

A gaggle of green-thumbed Archtober enthusiasts joined thread collective’s Elliott Maltby and Gita Nandan to learn about the NYCHA Red Hook West Urban Farm. Situated in Brooklyn, the one acre plot has served as a model for other farms being developed on New York Housing Authority properties, including at Howard Houses in Brownsville and in Coney Island.

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Aim High, Get Low: New “Lowline” linear park eyed in the Bronx

View of the proposed lowline from Rae Street (Google Maps)

View of the proposed lowline from Rae Street (Google Maps)

Call it High Line fever: since the first leg of James Corner and Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s High Line debuted in 2009, High Line–like projects have popped up all over the city and across the country. Now, not ten miles from the original, the Bronx may be slated for its very own rail-to-park conversion.

More after the jump.

Product> From Classic to Crazy: New Designs for Outdoor Seating

Spec Sheet  
ATELIER-VIERKANT-k-series-boulders-copy

(Courtesy Atelier Vierkant)

From quasi-camouflaged to head-turningly flamboyant, these designs for outdoor seating can enhance the character of a commercial plaza, a municipal complex, or an outdoor hospitality area.

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HOK takes a walk on the wild side in upstate New York

(Wild Walk / Flickr)

(Wild Walk / Flickr)

Fancy a walk up in the trees? Upstate New York now has its own “High Line” of sorts at the Wild Center in Adirondack Park, part of the Tupper Lake area.

Continue after the jump.

Archtober Building of the Day 4> Queens Botanical Garden Visitor and Administration Building

(Courtesy Archtober)

(Courtesy Archtober)

It makes sense that one of New York City’s exceptional botanical gardens would develop what would become one of the city’s first green buildings. What is extraordinary is that the Queens Botanical Garden (QBG) began its new Visitor and Administration Building in 2000 – the year LEED certification was launched – and achieved LEED Platinum for a building that ambitiously demonstrates what designed harmony between buildings and nature can be.

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Van Alen Institute announces winner of National Parks Now competition

(Courtesy Van Alsen Institute)

(Courtesy Van Alen Institute)

After a ten-month competition in which four teams proposed schemes in Northeastern national parks: Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park (Paterson, NJ); Sagamore Hill (Oyster Bay, NY); Steamtown National Historic Site (Scranton, PA); and Weir Farm (Wilton, CT), the Van Alen Institute has finally announced the winner. Read More

Bold new visions for the future city take shape at the Chicago Architecture Biennial

Filter Island by URBANLAB. (Matt Shaw/AN)

Filter Island by URBANLAB. (Matt Shaw/AN)

The international architecture cognoscenti have descended on the Chicago Cultural Center with a motherlode of new content from Thailand to Ecuador, ranging from robotically-assembled structures to investigations into social and infrastructural inequality. The consequences of this assemblage will unfold over the next few months, but one room in the Cultural Center is particularly clear in its ambition and vision for the future.

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Landscape architect Nicholas Quennell shares life-work insights in video

Nicholas Quennell (right) with Lawrence Halprin in San Francisco.

Nicholas Quennell (right) with Lawrence Halprin in
San Francisco. (Courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation.)

The Cultural Landscape Foundation just released the latest installment in their Pioneers Oral History series with a 64-minute interview-style documentary with landscape architect Nicholas Quennell.

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University of Texas at Austin is transforming Speedway into a pedestrian mall through campus

Rendering of the proposal (Courtesy PWP Landscape Architects)

Rendering of the proposal (Courtesy PWP Landscape Architecture)

The so-called Speedway in Austin, Texas, is being slowed to the pace of the pedestrian, thanks to a redesign by PWP Landscape Architecture. The road is not a racetrack as its name implies, but a street used heavily by cyclists and motorists as it cuts through the University of Texas at Austin. The project, called the “Speedway Mall,” is a move by the university to improve the area and boost its usage.
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Bjarke Ingels receives LafargeHolcim Global Bronze Prize for his work to make a more resilient Manhattan

Bjarke Ingels receiving the award. (Jason Sayer / AN)

Bjarke Ingels receiving the award. (Jason Sayer / AN)

The LafargeHolcim Foundation for Sustainable Construction has recognized New York City‘s commitment to progressive and resilient solutions by awarding Danish architect Bjarke Ingels of his eponymous firm BIG the Global Bronze Prize. AN was on hand as Ingels and company accepted the award.

Continue reading after the jump.

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