Chicago Architecture Biennial adds 40 firms to inaugural festival’s roster

School Lakefront Kiosk: THE CENT PAVILIONby  Pezo Von Ellrichshausen + College of Architecture, IIT.

School Lakefront Kiosk: THE CENT PAVILION by Pezo Von Ellrichshausen + College of Architecture, IIT. (Courtesy Pezo Von Ellrichshausen + College of Architecture, IIT)

The Chicago Architecture Biennial released a full list of participating designers today, bringing the total to more than 100 architects and artists from more than 30 countries.

More after the jump.

Temporary Urbanized Campsite for Netherlands’ Man-Made Island

(Courtesy Urban Campsite Amsterdam)

Solid Family by Boomhuttenfest. (Courtesy Urban Campsite Amsterdam)

On a man-made island in East Amsterdam, this isn’t your traditional campsite. The so-called Urban Campsite Amsterdam is an open-air exhibition that features 14 publicly accessible installations that can be booked for an evening under the stars. From trampoline roofs and hemispherical windows, each unique shelter is created by a wide array of designers, architects, and artists.

Continue reading after the jump.

This Daniel Libeskind–designed chair might look sharp, but it’s actually very soft

_55A2806

(Courtesy Moroso)

The indefatigable Daniel Libeskind has designed a chair that might make some think that he’s angling for a job to overhaul the USS Enterprise (or perhaps a $97 million earthbound residential replica of it).

More after the jump.

David Adjaye exhibition, Ukrainian urban planners among winners of new Graham Foundation grants

Lebbeus Woods, Sarajevo, from War and Architecture, 1993. Courtesy of the Estate of Lebbeus Woods, New York. From the 2015 Graham Foundation Organizational Grant to the University of California, Berkeley-Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive’s exhibition Architecture of Life.

Lebbeus Woods, Sarajevo, from War and Architecture, 1993. Courtesy of the Estate of Lebbeus Woods, New York. From the 2015 Graham Foundation Organizational Grant to the University of California, Berkeley-Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive’s exhibition Architecture of Life.

Chicago‘s Graham Foundation today announced nearly half a million dollars in grant funding for “groundbreaking” architectural projects by organizations, including the first major career survey of architect David Adjaye, an urban planning program in Ukraine, and architecture festivals in Norway and Portugal.

More after the jump.

Hot Topic: Yves Béhar’s new thermostat design the latest in a growing line of smart home gadgets

hive-behar

(Courtesy Fuseproject)

The once-prosaic thermostat has become a high profile design object as of late. As a critical gateway for the “Internet of Things” and the world of the connected home, it’s increasingly seen as an HVAC status symbol. With his new scheme for the Hive for British Gas, Yves Béhar takes a step back from the fray and focuses on the unit’s ease of use.

Read More

Two Belgian architects create a steel-frame maze which viewers can look down on from an old mine shaft

(Gijs Van Vaerenbergh)

(Gijs Van Vaerenbergh)

Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh created a sculptural-spatial intervention on the grounds of the Genk’s C-mine Arts Center in Belgium, where viewers must navigate a geometric conundrum.

More after the jump.

Meet the architect behind Kanye West’s 50-foot volcano, Los Angeles mansion, and design-savvy baby-proofing

Kanye atop a mountain on his Yeezus tour. (Peter Hutchins / Flickr)

Kanye atop a mountain on his Yeezus tour. (Peter Hutchins / Flickr)

Ironically, there are few surer ways to emerge from obscurity than to be hired by Kanye West. For Romanian architect Oana Stanescu, who designed a 50-foot stage-prop volcano for the rapper’s Yeezus tour, it meant finding a way to reconcile pop culture with utilitarian design.

Continue reading after the jump.

Painting Palmitas: Artists in Mexico cover an entire hillside village in one enormous psychedelic mural

(Courtesy Germen Crew)

(Courtesy Germen Crew)

Pachuca, Mexico is hoping a psychedelic mural can cement the transformation of a once crime-stricken neighborhood to a safer, more unified community. The government-sponsored urban renewal project, called El Macro Mural Barrio de Palmitas, coated over 200 hillside dwellings in a vibrant layer of paint with striking results.

Continue reading after the jump.

Arquitectonica’s newly opened zig-zagging tower in Miami is meant to reflect the rippling waters of Biscayne Bay

(Courtesy Arquitectonica)

(Courtesy Arquitectonica)

Miami-based Arquitectonica has completed a zig-zagging tower on booming Miami’s Biscayne Bay. The 42-story, luxury residence building was developed by the Related Group and has been dubbed the Icon Bay.

Read More

Lucky Seven: See how seven famous architects rethought Arne Jacobsen’s Series 7 Chair

Design, National, Product
Thursday, August 6, 2015
.
big

(Courtesy Republic of Fritz Hansen)

In observance of the 60th anniversary of the Series 7 chair, furniture manufacturer Fritz Hansen enlisted seven architects to re-envision the classic Arne Jacobsen design. Explaining the impetus behind the program, Jacob Holm, CEO of Fritz Hansen, said, “If we fall asleep on top of our heritage, design becomes museum items. And if that happens, it (design) no longer adds new value to the present time.”

The participating firms—BIG, Snøhetta, Zaha Hadid, Jean Nouvel, Neri & Hu, Jun Igarashi, and Carlos Ott in association with Carlos Ponce de Léon—certainly created some eye-opening interpretations of the chair. The architects’ comments on their designs reveal their inspirations and intentions.

View the redesigned chairs after the jump.

For the Birds> Michael Graves’ last design for Alessi updated his Bird Kettle with a dragon

Design, International, Product
Monday, August 3, 2015
.
9093REXLAZ

(Courtesy Alessi)

The last project Michael Graves completed for Alessi references one of his earliest creations for the company: The 9093 kettle, better known as the Bird Teakettle. To mark the thirtieth anniversary of the iconic piece, the late architect designed a new component for what’s being called the Tea Rex kettle.

In January 2015, Graves explained the development of this update.

More after the jump.

Open data from Transport for London spurs 3D axonometric plans of the Tube so passengers can mentally map their next trip

(Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

(Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Now you can strategize your next rush-hour skedaddle through the labyrinthine London Underground ahead of time—and choose all the right shortcuts. Transport for London (TfL) has released a series of 3D axonometric maps of the world’s oldest tube network, following a Freedom of Information Act (FoIA) request by Londoner Georges Vehres.

View the maps after the jump.

Page 7 of 26« First...56789...20...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2015 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License