David Adjaye exhibition, Ukrainian urban planners among winners of new Graham Foundation grants

Lebbeus Woods, Sarajevo, from War and Architecture, 1993. Courtesy of the Estate of Lebbeus Woods, New York. From the 2015 Graham Foundation Organizational Grant to the University of California, Berkeley-Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive’s exhibition Architecture of Life.

Lebbeus Woods, Sarajevo, from War and Architecture, 1993. Courtesy of the Estate of Lebbeus Woods, New York. From the 2015 Graham Foundation Organizational Grant to the University of California, Berkeley-Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive’s exhibition Architecture of Life.

Chicago‘s Graham Foundation today announced nearly half a million dollars in grant funding for “groundbreaking” architectural projects by organizations, including the first major career survey of architect David Adjaye, an urban planning program in Ukraine, and architecture festivals in Norway and Portugal.

More after the jump.

Construction gone awry: crane driver accidentally extricates a house and causes car pile-up—or that’s what the artists will have you believe

Art, International, Newsletter
Tuesday, August 11, 2015
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(Courtesy of ZKM)

(Courtesy of ZKM)

A house “mistakenly” unearthed from the soil by an inebriated crane driver hangs mournfully over a construction site in Karlsruhe, southern Germany. Torn roots sprout from its base to remind onlookers that it was once a happy home before its violent extrication.

Continue reading after the jump.

This giant ball pit in New York City is all about “the transformative power of play”

Architecture, Art, East, On View
Monday, August 10, 2015
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The BEACH at the National Building Museum. (NOAH KALINA)

The BEACH at the National Building Museum. (NOAH KALINA)

By now you’ve surely seen a friend or relative’s selfie from the massive ball pit at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. The installation, dubbed The BEACH, was designed by Snarkitecture and includes nearly one-million all-white, translucent, recyclable plastic balls. It’s like a McDonald’s ball pit, but artsier and probably a little bit cleaner.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bringing Street Art Back Downtown: Check out these enormous murals this weekend from New York City’s LoMan Fest

Art, East, On View
Friday, August 7, 2015
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f920bd_6b159c8ba2cc42aeabf7533ae23aaa6b.jpg_srb_p_1207_805_75_22_0.50_1.20_0

Mural by Tristan Eaton (Courtesy LoMan Festival)

Even as Lower Manhattan has become increasingly filled with luxury condos and scrubbed of its grit, it has retained the legacy and image as a cultural hub. Though many artists who once thrived in downtown have left due to skyrocketing rents and a shrinking stock of available studio and living space, the desire to keep the arts alive there has not withered for some devoted New Yorkers.

Continue reading after the jump.

Painting Palmitas: Artists in Mexico cover an entire hillside village in one enormous psychedelic mural

(Courtesy Germen Crew)

(Courtesy Germen Crew)

Pachuca, Mexico is hoping a psychedelic mural can cement the transformation of a once crime-stricken neighborhood to a safer, more unified community. The government-sponsored urban renewal project, called El Macro Mural Barrio de Palmitas, coated over 200 hillside dwellings in a vibrant layer of paint with striking results.

Continue reading after the jump.

This million dollar sculptural Ferris wheel at a Montreal bus stop is stirring questions about cost

(City of Montreal)

(City of Montreal)

A new bus stop in Montreal will include a 64-foot-tall, Ferris Wheel–shaped art installation that cost the city a cool $840,000. For blatantly obvious reasons, many Quebecois aren’t thrilled about that—in no small part because the expensive art project is in a part of Montreal that is struggling to combat poverty.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Glimmering light installation recalls the destroyed baronial towers of Bannerman’s Castle near New York City

Art, East, Lighting, On View, Preservation
Tuesday, August 4, 2015
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Photo_by_Rob_Penner-copy

(Rob Penner)

We head home: through the gloss of rain or weight
of snow, or the plum blush of dusk, but always—home, …
facing the stars
hope—a new constellation
waiting for us to map it,
waiting for us to name it—together.

—One Day, by Robert Blanco. Written for the second Inauguration of President Barack Obama, January 21, 2013.

Melissa McGill’s light-based public art project, Constellation, arises from the romantic ruins of Bannerman’s Castle on Pollepel Island, a mysterious sight glimpsed from trains heading north 50 miles from New York City just shy of Beacon, and nearby to West Point and Storm King. If you’ve ever wondered about this fleeting apparition, this art installation, which will be up for two years, is the perfect vehicle for visiting the island or gazing from the riverbank.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Four Boston design firms fill the Rose Kennedy Greenway with art at the intersection of architecture

(Courtesy Design Biennial Boston)

Marginal by Landing Studio. (Courtesy Design Biennial Boston)

Through September 25th, emerging architects and designers are being celebrated in Boston’s 4th Design Biennial. The program features installations, created by four, jury-chosen design firms, exhibited along the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway Conservancy.

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This Saturday, a projection-mapped display will cover the Empire State Building to raise awareness about endangered species

Art, East, On View, Skyscrapers
Thursday, July 30, 2015
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As supertall residential towers reach new heights in Manhattan, the Empire State Building still stands strong in New York City‘s skyline—especially after dusk. The building’s crown is quintessential New York and a sky-high representation of holidays, anniversaries, and the day’s news in colorful light. On Saturday night, the Empire State Building will be used for even more.

COntinue reading after the jump.

In a commentary against waste-producing lifestyles, Indian artist creates a sculpture made from 70,000 bottle caps

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

(Courtesy Arunkumar HG)

Indian artist Arunkumar HG has created a somewhat tongue-in-cheek calling out of our throwaway, waste-producing lifestyles with a shoreline sculpture made from nearly 70,000 bottle screw caps. The artist amassed the collection from his neighborhood over the course of a year, carefully stacked the caps, and connected them in vertical configurations using steel filaments.

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Honoring the forgotten: Melbourne-based artist Robbie Rowlands makes Detroit’s abandoned houses come to life

(Courtesy Robbie Rowlands)

‘In Between’ (Courtesy Robbie Rowlands)

The deteriorating floorboards and walls of abandoned homes appear to defiantly reassert their existence in artist Robbie Rowlands’ exhibition, Intervention. While on residency in Detroit, Michigan, the Melbourne-based artist drew attention to abandoned houses by ripping out certain sections and creating track-like extensions of their fixtures—so that the otherwise nondescript wall seems to implore, “pay attention to me.”

Continue reading after the jump.

James Corner Field Operations unveils initial plans for The Underline, a 10-mile linear park in Miami

Dadeland Trail Connection. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

Dadeland Trail Connection. (Courtesy James Corner Field Operations)

It has become common fair to refer to any and all rails-to-trails project as a certain city’s “High Line. ” (Yup, we’ve been guilty of that too.) The ubiquitous High Line comparison might be flattering, but it’s obviously too simplistic. It glosses over site-specific details and rings a bit too New York–centric.

More after the jump.

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