Letter to the Editor> Ban Bang: A reader responds to Shigeru Ban’s Aspen Art Museum

(Michael Moran)

(Michael Moran)

[ Editor’s Note: The following reader-submitted letter was left on archpaper.com in response to our critique of Shigeru Ban’s Aspen Art Museum (AN 05_10.15.2014_SW). Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

Deja vu all over again. Your article is a thoughtful critical review. I add a few observations.

Continue reading after the jump.

What’s shaking up Dallas-Fort Worth? Dozens of earthquakes rattling the Texas metroplex

Southwest
Friday, January 16, 2015
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Thirty-four earthquakes have occurred in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex city of Irving since October 2014. Over the past week, the Dallas suburb has been shaken by a number of earthquakes from a common source point lying roughly below the former site of Texas Stadium. Those 34 quakes have contributed to the over 130 occurrences since 2008. The number is staggering considering the seismic activity in the region was non-existent prior.

Continue reading after the jump.

Hotel that inspired The Shining wants you to design its 10,100-square-foot hedge maze

The Shining maze.

The Shining maze.

If you haven’t seen or read the entirety of The Shining then you’re going to want to fix that right away—like, right now. Use the time you would have spent reading this 225-word story with, say, watching the two-and-a-half hour film. It’s great; you’ll love it. Okay, with that disclaimer out of the way, let’s continue. You’ll want to continue.

Continue.

Arktura Forms Gensler’s Frameworks

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The serpentine steel screen is composed of hundreds of uniquely shaped cells. (Courtesy Arktura)

The serpentine steel screen is composed of hundreds of uniquely shaped cells. (Courtesy Arktura)

Framework is made of 260 unique steel boxes, laser-cut and sculpted on an 18-axis metal forming machine.

When designers at Gensler’s Dallas office dreamt up plans for a serpentine steel screen composed of hundreds of perforated cells, they enlisted the design-build talents of Arktura, based in Gardena, California, 14 miles south of downtown Los Angeles. Though still mostly architects, Arktura’s staff includes mechanical engineers and even a physicist. The company’s 50,000-square-foot space includes a design studio, an engineering studio, and manufacturing space where they produce furniture, architectural products, and custom projects—like the one Gensler took to calling “Frameworks: Cellure Structure.”

“It’s in our DNA to allow a lot of flexibility when we’re working with design teams,” said Sebastian Muñoz, director of project design and development. Gensler’s concept remained intact through numerous redesigns, Muñoz said, but getting it right required a lot of flexibility.

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Justin Diles Breaks the Mold for TEX-FAB

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Justin Diles' Plastic Stereotomy took first place in TEX-FAB's fourth annual digital design and fabrication competition. (Courtesy Justin Diles)

Justin Diles’ Plastic Stereotomy took first place in TEX-FAB’s fourth annual digital design and fabrication competition. (Courtesy Justin Diles)

Competition winner uses composite materials to re-imagine Semper’s primitive hut.

The title of TEX-FAB‘s fourth annual competition—Plasticity—has a double meaning. It refers first to the concept at the core of the competition brief: the capacity of parametric design and digital fabrication to manifest new formal possibilities. But it also alludes to the material itself, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP). “Plastics have the potential to push contemporary architecture beyond the frame-plus-cladding formula dominant since at least the 19th century,” said competition winner Justin Diles. Pointing to traditional stonecutting and vault work, he said, “I’m very interested in this large volumetric mode of construction, but I’m not at all interested in the stone. I think that composites probably offer the best way of addressing this old yet new mode of constructing architecture.”
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On View> New Orleans’ neoclassical Gallier Hall washed in dynamic light for LUNA Fête

21st century technology animates an 18th century facade. (Courtesy Arts Council New Orleans)

21st century technology animates a 19th century facade. (Courtesy Arts Council New Orleans)

On November 30, the Arts Council New Orleans launched LUNA Fête, a large-scale, outdoor light and sound installation that can be experienced free by the public at Lafayette Square. The centerpiece of the event is a projection mapping display by French art group La Maison Productions that transforms the Crescent City’s former city hall (Gallier Hall, 1853) into a neoclassical canvas. The nine-minute animated work plays on the columns and contours of the Greek Revival edifice with a richly layered spectacle inspired by the music and cultural history of New Orleans.

Watch a video after the jump.

Eavesdrop> Johnson for Sale: Dallas’ Monumental Beck House has hit the market

Architecture, Eavesdroplet, Southwest
Friday, November 21, 2014
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Philip Johnson's Beck House in Dallas. (Courtesy Bodron + Fruit)

Philip Johnson’s Beck House in Dallas. (Courtesy Bodron + Fruit)

Philip Johnson’s only Dallas residential design, The Beck House (1964), has hit the market with a $27.5 million asking price. Current owners Naomi Aberly and Larry Lebowitz—who famously hosted President Barack H. Obama twice within the home’s white walls at fundraising events—recently spent seven years conducting a detailed modernization and renovation of the modernist palace, as well as a re-landscaping of the 6.45-acre park that surrounds it. Dallas firm Bodron + Fruit touched up the architecture, including adding a pavilion beside the new pool, while Massachusetts-based Reed Hilderbrand worked on the grounds.

Creek Show shines a light on Austin’s Waller Creek

High Watermark by Thoughtbarn (James Leasure)

High Water Mark by Thoughtbarn (James Leasure)

On the evening of Thursday, November 13, temperatures in Austin, Texas, dropped below freezing. In spite of the fact that most locals are unaccustomed to this degree of frigidity, more than 1,000 people turned out for Creek Show: Light Night 2014. The event, which ran from five in the evening until midnight, celebrated the unveiling of a series of light installations along Waller Creek between 5th and 9th streets.

Continue reading after the jump.

Biomimetic Pyramid by Burkett Design/Studio NYL

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Inspired by honeycombs and plate tectonics, the new Science Pyramid houses the Denver Botanic Garden's research and conservation efforts. (Scott Dressel-Martin)

Burkett Design/Studio NYL’s Science Pyramid houses the Denver Botanic Garden’s research and conservation efforts. (Scott Dressel-Martin)

Plate tectonics, honeycombs inspire new Denver Botanic Gardens research center.

For their new Science Pyramid, the Denver Botanic Gardens sought a design that delivered more than just aesthetic impact. “They wanted an icon, but they also wanted to show an icon can be high performance,” said Chris O’Hara, founding principal of Studio NYL. Studio NYL and its SKINS Group worked with architect Burkett Design and longtime Botanic Gardens general contractor GH Phipps to craft a structure to house the institution’s conservation and research efforts. “People think of the Botanic Gardens as a beautiful place to go, but what most of them don’t realize is what happens behind the scenes,” said O’Hara. “The whole concept was to showcase that, and to educate the public not just about what the Botanic Gardens are doing, but a little more about their environment.” Clad in a Swisspearl rain screen that serves as both roof and wall, the Science Pyramid’s biomimetic design reconsiders the relationship between the built and natural worlds.

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Letter to the Editor> Evidence of Attention

Letter to the Editor, Southwest
Monday, November 17, 2014
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(New Cities Foundation / Rachel Dare)

(New Cities Foundation / Rachel Dare)

[ Editor’s Note: The following reader comment was left on archpaper.com in response to the editorial “New Cities and Old” (AN 04_07.16.2014_SW). Opinions expressed in letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinions or sentiments of the newspaper. AN welcomes reader letters, which could appear in our regional print editions. To share your opinion, please email editor@archpaper.com]

Whether it be formal arts districts or vibrant arts offerings spread across a metropolitan area, community support of the arts is key to quality of life for downtowns, suburbs, and connected rural communities.

Jill Diaz
Director of Development at Carolina Ballet

Filed Under: 

Palm Springs Architecture & Design Center opens tomorrow, November 9th

Architecture, Art, Design, Southwest, West
Saturday, November 8, 2014
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The renovated building. (Courtesy Palm Springs Art Musuem, Architecture and Design Center, photo by Daniel Chavkin)

The renovated building. (Courtesy Palm Springs Art Musuem, Architecture and Design Center, photo by Daniel Chavkin)

Palm Springs Architecture and Design Center will officially open on November 9 with its inaugural exhibition, An Eloquent Modernist, E. Stewart Williams, Architect. Williams is a member of the group of early post-World War II architects that landed in the Coachella desert and helped turn the resort into a fledgling center of modern design mostly for vacation and retirement homes but also of schools, commercial buildings, and civic monuments.

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On View> Yusuke Asai paints with mud at Houston’s Rice Gallery

Art, On View, Southwest
Wednesday, November 5, 2014
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(Nash Baker)

(Nash Baker)

yamatane
Rice Gallery
6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas
Through November 23

yamatane, on view now at Rice Gallery in Houston, is a site-specific installation by Japanese artist Yusuke Asai. Created in just under two weeks by Asai and a team of student volunteers working around the clock, yamatane is composed of pigments made from soil collected in the Houston area—brown, yellow, pink, red, and even green dirt that was gathered before the artist arrived and ground into pigment with only water added to turn it into paint.

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