Mies van der Rohe’s Lafayette Park complex in Detroit was just named a national landmark

"Lafayette Tower West After A Storm," shot in HDR. (Bryan Debus via Flickr)

“Lafayette Tower West After A Storm,” shot in HDR. (Bryan Debus via Flickr)

More than 50 years after its construction, the single-largest collection of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe‘s built work is now a national landmark. The National Park Service on Tuesday designated Detroit‘s Lafayette Park its 2,564th National Historic Landmark, validating the efforts of the Michigan State Historic Preservation Office, which began the documentation and nomination process in 2012. Quinn Evans Architects of Ann Arbor led those efforts as part of the preservation group’s Michigan Modern Project.

Continue reading after the jump.

This fake town by the University of Michigan to become testing ground for developing smarter driverless cars

(Courtesy University of Michigan)

(Courtesy University of Michigan)

Researchers the University of Michigan just one-upped a recent virtual SimCity project for testing smart technologies of future cities. A tangible, 32-acre testing ground for driverless cars called MCity pits autonomous vehicles against every conceivable real-life obstacle, minus the caprice of human drivers.

Continue reading after the jump.

DXU Delivers Luxe Minimalism in Dekton

Brought to you with support from:
facadeplus_logo1
DXU wrapped Porsche Design's Oak Brook, Illinois boutique in a matte black Dekton rain screen. (Courtesy Cosentino)

DXU wrapped Porsche Design’s Oak Brook, Illinois boutique in a matte black Dekton rain screen. (Courtesy Cosentino)

Sleek black rain screen reflects Porsche Design’s understated style.

In the world of high-end retail, first impressions matter. Knowing this, DXU, LLC principal Eric Styer took special care selecting a facade material for the Porsche Design boutique in Oak Brook, Illinois. Read More

Here’s how students from IIT used cutting edge technology to craft a rippling carbon fiber facade

CARBONskin was designed and fabricated by IIT students this spring. (Courtesy Alphonso Peluso)

CARBONskin was designed and fabricated by IIT students this spring. (Courtesy Alphonso Peluso)

Though only one semester had elapsed since the student-designed and fabricated FIBERwave carbon fiber pavilion went up, by early 2015 IIT professor Alphonso Peluso was hungry for more.

Continue reading after the jump.

Honoring the forgotten: Melbourne-based artist Robbie Rowlands makes Detroit’s abandoned houses come to life

(Courtesy Robbie Rowlands)

‘In Between’ (Courtesy Robbie Rowlands)

The deteriorating floorboards and walls of abandoned homes appear to defiantly reassert their existence in artist Robbie Rowlands’ exhibition, Intervention. While on residency in Detroit, Michigan, the Melbourne-based artist drew attention to abandoned houses by ripping out certain sections and creating track-like extensions of their fixtures—so that the otherwise nondescript wall seems to implore, “pay attention to me.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Cincinnati’s U.S. Bank Arena unveils major overhaul and expansion to stay relevant amid regional competition

U.S. Bank Arena concept. (MSA Sport)

U.S. Bank Arena concept. (MSA Sport)

A major renovation and expansion project planned for Cincinnati‘s U.S. Bank Arena could further change the face of the city’s rapidly evolving riverfront.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Indiana draws conservative ire for $55 million 200th birthday bash and bicentennial plaza by MKSK

Plans for a new fountain at Indiana's Bicentennial Plaza  in Indianapolis. (MKSK Studios)

Plans for a new fountain at Indiana’s Bicentennial Plaza in Indianapolis. (MKSK Studios)

Hoosiers, if you didn’t get a gift for Indiana on the occasion of its 200th birthday next year, don’t fret—state and local governments have pledged tens of millions in infrastructure investments and new buildings for the Bicentennial. The state’s share carries a total value of more than $55 million, inviting criticism from fiscal conservatives.

Continue reading after the jump.

Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel floats ordinance to fast-track transit-oriented development, reduce parking minimums

Currently under construction, 2211 N. Milwaukee Ave. is one of several TOD projects planned near Chicago transit stations. (Brininstool + Lynch)

Currently under construction, 2211 N. Milwaukee Ave. is one of several TOD projects planned near Chicago transit stations. (Brininstool + Lynch)

This week Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel will push a plan to expand transit-oriented development (TOD) by easing zoning restrictions and releasing certain projects from parking requirements altogether.

Continue reading after the jump.

Navy Pier’s new “Wave Wall” by nArchitects lays a modern Spanish Steps at the foot of a Ferris wheel

Navy Pier's new "Wave Wall" (nARCHITECTS)

Navy Pier’s new “Wave Wall” (nARCHITECTS)

Navy Pier is three years into a $278 million overhaul, and the new face of Illinois’ most visited tourist attraction is beginning to emerge—most recently a grand staircase titled “Wave Wall” washed over the foot of the pier’s famous ferris wheel.

COntinue reading after the jump.

A pair of Chicago architects planted this electric pink porch in downtown Vancouver

"Porch Parade" (Design with Company)

“Porch Parade” (Design with Company)

A stand-alone porch with a psychedelic paint job opened earlier this month on Vancouver‘s Robson Street, beckoning passersby to inhabit the lighthearted public space for the fifth round of the city’s Robson Redux design-build competition.

Continue reading after the jump.

nARCHITECTS reveals Café Pavilion for Cleveland’s revamped Public Square

Rendering of a new cafe pavilion for Cleveland's Public Square. (nARCHITECTS via James Corner Field Operations)

Rendering of a new cafe pavilion for Cleveland’s Public Square. (nARCHITECTS via James Corner Field Operations)

New renderings for one of the largest public space projects in the Midwest have been revealed, showing a new 2,500-square-foot “Café Pavilion” in Cleveland’s Public Square. Read More

This urban intervention in Chicago would let citizens control colorful lights under the “El” with their smartphones

City Terrain, Lighting, Midwest, Urbanism
Wednesday, July 22, 2015
.
Wabash Lights, a site-specific installation under Chicago's L. (Courtesy Wabash Lights)

Wabash Lights, a site-specific installation under Chicago’s L. (Courtesy Wabash Lights)

Chicago is best known for Wrigley Field and the Sears Tower (yes, the Sears Tower), but one of its most prominent urban features is the elevated train tracks that form the “Loop,” or the downtown area bound by this snaking steel goliath. However poetic the idea of the “El” might be, it brute steel structure could, like most raised infrastructures, use some improvements.

More after the jump.

Page 9 of 74« First...7891011...203040...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2015 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License