Construction wraps up on Moshe Safdie’s Sky Habitat towers in Singapore

(Courtesy Edward Hendricks, Safdie Architects)

(Courtesy Edward Hendricks, Safdie Architects)

Reaching up into the sky in Bishan, Singapore is Moshe Safdie‘s recently completed development, and aptly named, Sky Habitat. Safdie’s design includes walkways that connect the the two structures up to 38 storey’s up, offering views across the suburban sprawl of Bishan.

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Design worth its salt: Dattner and WXY team up for municipal infrastructure on Manhattan’s West Side

Architecture, East, Pictorial
Friday, December 18, 2015
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Spring Street Salt Shed (Courtesy Dattner)

Spring Street Salt Shed (Courtesy Dattner Architects)

The New York City Department of Sanitation’s (DSNY) Soho facilities prove that design for trash need not be rubbish. On a grey December day, five architects gave a tour of two buildings—the Spring Street Salt Shed and Manhattan Districts 1/2/5 Garage—that comprise DSNY’s new facilities on Spring Street at the West Side Highway.

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Pictorial> The Hills come alive on Governors Island

View from the path leading up to Outlook Hill (Audrey Wachs / AN)

View from the path leading up to Outlook Hill (Audrey Wachs / AN)

Standing near the top of Outlook Hill, Leslie Koch, president of The Trust for Governors Island, explained the reason for commissioning four huge earth mounds on an island in the middle of New York Harbor. “Most New Yorkers don’t experience that fancy view [of the skyline]. You don’t get to see the city on high from the city that created views.” The Hills, part of a $220 million renovation of Governors Island, do create new ways of viewing the city and its surroundings.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pictorial> Take a look inside Dattner’s 34th St-Hudson Yards subway station, now open to the public

(Patrick Cashin for MTA / Flickr)

(Patrick Cashin for MTA / Flickr)

On Sunday, September 13th, New York City got its first new subway station in 25 years. Located at 34th Street and Eleventh Avenue, the 34th St-Hudson Yards station extended the 7 train one and a half miles to serve Manhattan’s Far West Side.

See inside the station after the jump.

Take a trip up onto the Barclays Center’s green roof, where sedum installation is over half complete

The Barclays Center. (Chris Ryan / AN)

The Barclays Center. (Chris Ryan / AN)

When The Architect’s Newspaper first visited the Barclays Center’s green roof, installation had just begun and there was only one strip of sedum running up the arena. Now, six weeks later, sedum covers more than 50 percent of the roof, and, without being too hyperbolic about things, it’s looking like a verdant hillside up there.

More after the jump.

Relive the glory of the 1970 Osaka Expo, complete with space frames, Metabolism, inflatables, and geodesic domes

Toshiba IHI Pavilion. (Courtesy Flickr/m-louis)

Toshiba IHI Pavilion. (Courtesy Flickr/m-louis)

As Expo Milano 2015 continues to wow millions of visitors with stunning architecture and innovative exhibitions about the future of food production, we can’t help but get a little nostalgic for some past Expos. While London 1851 (Crystal Palace) and New York 1939 (The World of Tomorrow) are close to our hearts, it is the 1970 Expo in Osaka that really gets us fired up. Take a look at the seemingly endless stream of fantastic designs after the jump. Read More

Pictorial> Twenty-one of the best pavilions from Milan Expo 2015

All the Pavilions. (Courtesy Expo Milano 2015)

All the Pavilions. (Courtesy Expo Milano 2015)

Milano Expo 2015 is rolling along, with 145 countries and a host of international organizations, civil society organizations, and corporations displaying their food-centric traditions and the latest sustainable agriculture and food production techniques.

Continue reading after the jump.

Take a tour of Chicago’s newest Green Line stop, Cermak-McCormick Place, designed by Ross Barney Architects

Cermak-McCormick Place: the newest stop on Chicago's CTA Green Line, designed by Ross Barney Architects. (Kate Joyce Studios)

Cermak-McCormick Place: the newest stop on Chicago’s CTA Green Line, designed by Ross Barney Architects. (Kate Joyce Studios)

Chicago commuters transiting through the South Loop and Chinatown have had a new stop since early this year, when the Chicago Transit Authority opened its newest train stop: Cermak-McCormick Place.

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Take a look at the view from the tippy top of Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park, the supertall tower that will soon house the world’s billionaires

The Penthouse at 432 Park Avenue. (Matt Shaw / AN)

The Penthouse at 432 Park Avenue. (Matt Shaw / AN)

AN got a rare look at the penthouse of 432 Park, Rafael Viñoly‘s soon-to-be-tallest residential building in the western hemisphere. After a six-minute ride on the construction lift, expansive, $95 million views open up in a 360 degree panorama from large square windows along all four sides of the full-floor apartment.

See for yourself after the jump.

Take a tour of FAT’s quirky house-as-narrative collaboration with Grayson Perry

House for Essex by Grayson Perry and FAT. (Courtesy Living Architecture)

House for Essex by Grayson Perry and FAT. (Courtesy Living Architecture)

If there was ever a perfect curatorial pairing, Alain de Botton made it when he selected artist Grayson Perry to work with English architects Fashion Architecture Taste (FAT). Architecturally speaking, their so-called House for Essex is a “built story”—a shrine to an Essex woman named Julie who led a life as a rock chick and later a social worker, along the way marrying twice and finding happiness before being tragically killed by a curry delivery moped.

Continue reading after the jump.

Pictorial> Austin Kelly, 1966–2015

Architecture, Obit, Pictorial, West
Monday, May 4, 2015
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XTEN's Nakahouse (Steve King)

XTEN’s Nakahouse (Steve King)

Austin Kelly, truly one of Los Angeles’ most talented young architects, sadly passed away last month. He was only 49, and the cause of death was cancer. Kelly studied architecture at Yale and worked for Frank Israel, Frank Gehry, Eric Owen Moss, and DMJM/Keating before founding XTEN Architecture with his wife Monika Haefelfinger in 2000.

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The water is so clear right now in Lake Michigan, you can see sunken ships beneath the crystal waves

The 121 foot brig James McBride ran aground during a storm on October 19, 1857. (U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Traverse City)

The 121 foot brig James McBride ran aground during a storm on October 19, 1857. (U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Traverse City)

Winter ice is melting around the Great Lakes, revealing cerulean waters below—and, in northern Lake Michigan, an open graveyard of shipwrecks.

Continue reading after the jump.

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