Have your LEGOs and eat them, too: Here’s how to make edible, stackable LEGO gummy candies

Design, International, Newsletter
Wednesday, June 3, 2015
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(Courtesy Grant Thompson, YouTube)

(Courtesy Grant Thompson, YouTube)

YouTube vlogger Grant Thompson aka ‘King of Random’ recently broke the internet with a how-to video for concocting edible, stackable LEGO gummy candies.

Watch how after the jump.

Piece by piece, Watch as New York City’s first micro-unit housing complex by nArchitects takes shape

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

New York City‘s first-ever entirely micro-unit housing complex is being stacked together on Manhattan‘s East Side. Back in February, we wrote that the modules for the nARCHITECTS-designed building were being assembled at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and now we can report that they have begun arriving at their permanent home in Kips Bay.

Watch the video after the jump.

Architects will soon suspend this cellulose fiber canopy made from discarded paper in Boston

(Image courtesy of Bigger than a Breadbox competition)

(Image courtesy of Bigger than a Breadbox competition)

Recognizing architects’ increased use of installations for experimentation and prototyping, the “Bigger than a Breadbox, Smaller than a Building” competition awards project proposals that use the medium for spatial exploration.

Continue reading after the jump.

This stack of shipping containers by LOT-EK could become the nomadic coworking office of the future

(Courtesy LOT-EK / Spacious)

(Courtesy LOT-EK / Spacious)

The future of the mobile office is on its way, and it’s blurring the lines between the home and the workplace. Spacious is the name of a “coworking hotel” concept being touted by its founder and CEO, Preston Pesek, as the future of the workplace, combining a traditional coworking space, a hotel, and retail into a giant live, work, play experience. And what better way to house the modern nomadic workforce than shipping containers?

Continue reading after the jump.

Creating a statistically desirable dwelling: Two million Swedes crowdsourced this house and didn’t even know it

(Courtesy Tham & Videgard)

(Courtesy Tham & Videgard)

Your every click adds to a goldmine of consumer information marketers cadge—and now architects can cash in, too. Swedish architecture firm Tham & Videgard created renderings of the country’s most desirable home based on metrics wrangled from 200 million clicks on 86,000 properties on sale between January and October 2014 on Hemnet, Sweden’s most popular property website.

Continue reading after the jump.

Calatrava says he’s been treated “like a dog,” but hey George Clooney is still a fan

Calatrava's city of arts and sciences seen in Tomorrowland.

Calatrava’s city of arts and sciences seen in Tomorrowland.

Santiago Calatrava really wants you to stop blaming him for the very delayed and very over budget World Trade Center Transit Hub. All of your snark and rude comments have really gotten to him, which he recently revealed to the Wall Street Journal. “It has not been easy for me,” he said“I have been treated like a dog.” But there’s now some good news that should help cheer up the Spanish starchitect: famous person George Clooney is staunchly on his side.

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Sanjeev Tankha explains the intracacies of engineering facades for hot, humid Houston

Houston's sunny climate presents a special set of challenges to facade designers and fabricators. (Theodore Scott / Flickr)

Houston’s sunny climate presents a special set of challenges to facade designers and fabricators. (Theodore Scott / Flickr)

Thanks to the city’s humid subtropical climate, facade designers and fabricators face a special set of challenges in Houston. Unchecked, steady sunshine and high temperatures can permeate the building envelope, leading to a heavy reliance on mechanical cooling systems. Meanwhile, Houston’s Gulf Coast location makes it vulnerable to tropical storms.

Continue reading after the jump.

Joseph Wong to design mixed-use, high-rise development in downtown San Diego

Joseph Wong is lead architect for The Block, a mixed-use, high-rise development in downtown San Diego. (Courtesy Zephyr/JWDA)

Joseph Wong is lead architect for The Block, a mixed-use, high-rise development in downtown San Diego. (Courtesy Zephyr)

Local real estate and investment company Zephyr has named Joseph Wong of Joseph Wong Design Associates (JWDA) lead architect of their 60,000-square-foot mixed-use development planned for downtown San Diego. The Block, as it is currently known (the developer has yet to select a final name), will be the first high-rise, mixed-use project in the city since the recession. With an estimated cost exceeding $250 million, the development promises to be a major player in the demographic and architectural transformation of San Diego’s urban core.

Continue reading after the jump.

Plans advance for Congress Square, a pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use project in Boston

Congress Square overview. (Courtesy Related Beal & Arrowstreet)

Congress Square overview. (Courtesy Related Beal & Arrowstreet)

Boston is moving closer to turning an under-utilized part of its financial district into a 24-hour, mixed-used entertainment center. BostInno reported that the Boston Redevelopment Authority held a meeting on the project Monday night, which has been dubbed “Congress Square.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Jaklitsch / Gardner’s beekeeping & honey extraction center in Tanzania is designed with the local community in mind

Mizengo Pinda Asali & Nyuki Sanctuary. (Courtesy Jaklitsch/Gardner)

Mizengo Pinda Asali & Nyuki Sanctuary. (Courtesy Jaklitsch/Gardner)

New York City–based Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects has unveiled renderings for the Mizengo Pinda Asali & Nyuki Sanctuary, a beekeeping and honey extraction center near Dodoma, Tanzania. The firm partnered with Follow the Honey, National Beekeeping Supplies, and Nyuki Safari Company to build a complex that supports the local beekeeping economy and serves as a cultural and educational anchor for the community.

Continue reading after the jump.

REX starts sewing a pleated-glass facade onto a brutalist Manhattan tower

The Manhattan West Development. (Courtesy Brookfield)

The Manhattan West Development. (Courtesy Brookfield)

Last year, AN explored REX’s strategy to revamp a brutalist, ziggurat-shaped tower on Manhattan‘s west side with a modern, pleated-glass facade. Since the Davis Brody Bond–designed structure was originally a warehouse, developer Brookfield Properties thought it made sense to give the building a glassy facelift before the tech companies moved in.

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Portland designers crafted this tea-toned tea shop in Miami to feature an inviting lounge-meets-café interior

(Courtesy Ken Hayden)

(Courtesy Ken Hayden)

Miami’s caffeine junkies have a new, chic watering hole to haunt. Small Tea, whose neutral brown and tan–toned interior begets the perfect cuppa, was designed by Portland, OR–based Osmose Design. The store, café, and retreat serves 84 tea varieties, and its material palette is inspired by tea-making implements.

Continue reading after the jump.

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