Hopkins Architects moves forward with revamp of Sert’s Holyoke Center at Harvard

Light filling the interior study spaces (Courtesy Hopkins Architects)

Light filling the interior study spaces (Courtesy Hopkins Architects)

British firm Hopkins Architects (formerly Michael Hopkins & Partners) has been granted planning permission from local authorities to build the new Smith Campus Center for Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Continue reading after the jump.

The Architectural League New York announces 2016 Emerging Voices winners

Omar Gandhi Architect, Rabbit Snare Gorge, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada. (Doublespace Photography)

Omar Gandhi Architect, Rabbit Snare Gorge, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada. (Doublespace Photography)

The Architectural League of New York announced the eight winners of its annual Emerging Voices program.

The 2016 winners are…

Renzo Piano’s embattled “Paddington Pole” tower heads back to the drawing board

Exterior Render. (Courtesy Renzo Piano)

Exterior Render. (Courtesy Renzo Piano)

Those who campaigned against Renzo Piano‘s cylindrical skyscraper in Paddington, London,  are celebrating a victory now that plans for the tower have been withdrawn from planning. The tower, dubbed the “Paddington Pole,” was set to top out 834 feet (72 floors) and rub shoulders with the Cheesegrater (The Leadenhall Building by Richard Rogers).

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WRNS Studio to expand Microsoft headquarters in Mountain View with green roof, creekside habitat

A field of green for Microsoft's campus overhaul and expansion. (Steelblue/ WRNS Studio)

A field of green for Microsoft’s campus overhaul and expansion. (Steelblue/ WRNS Studio)

Last week Microsoft submitted plans to the city of Mountain View to expand its Silicon Valley headquarters. As with Apple’s upcoming building and Google’s proposed campus, this one is also pastoral and eco-minded. A rendering by shows the low-rise office buildings enmeshed in a riparian landscape and topped by an expanse of verdant meadow.

Continue after the jump.

Does Snøhetta’s design for a new library at Temple University spell the end of books?

Architecture, East, News, Newsletter
Tuesday, January 26, 2016
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(Courtesy Snøhetta)

(Courtesy Snøhetta)

Libraries are temples for books, though Snøhetta’s plan for a new library at Temple University in Philadelphia argues that you can have one without the other. The design of the Temple University Library is influenced by the academies of ancient Greece, which privileged social spaces for discourse over the storage and management of written materials.

Continue after the jump.

A theme park inside a 2,000-year-old Transylvanian salt mine is like playing on another planet

Transylvania Salt Mine. (Courtesy Richard John Seymour)

Transylvania Salt Mine. (Courtesy Richard John Seymour)

Each year, thousands of visitors descend into Salina Turda, a Transylvanian salt mine dating over 2,000 years. In its lifetime the salt mine has had many uses, storing the coffers of Hungarian kings and Habsburg emperors, providing shelter during World War II, and even operating as a cheese storage center.

In 1992, Salina Turda reopened as a visitor attraction, and after 16 years and $6.5 million of investments, has transformed into a museum and theme park. British photographer Richard John Seymour, documented this subterranean destination.

More after the jump.

John Hejduk’s The House of the Suicide structures get new life in Prague

John Hejduk's The House of the Suicide and The House of the Mother of the Suicide (Renata Hejduk)

John Hejduk’s The House of the Suicide and The House of the Mother of the Suicide (Renata Hejduk)

John Hejduk’s pair of architectural structures, The House of the Suicide and the House of the Mother of the Suicide, are once again on view in Prague. Inspired by a poem by David Shapiro, the pieces were first designed in the late 1980s as an ephemeral memorial in tribute to the 1969 self-immolation of the Czech dissident Jan Palach whose death was in protest of the 1968 Soviet invasion. On January 16 permanent versions of the two structures were installed in Jan Palach Square (formerly Red Army Square), with a plaque that displays Shapiro’s poem, “The Funeral of Jan Palach.”

Continue after the jump.

Schmidt Hammer Lassen designs a Danish residential complex with green facades inspired by a local ivy-covered school

Valdemars Have. (Courtesy Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects)

Valdemars Have. (Courtesy Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects)

Last week, Scandinavian firm Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects announced another win. The firm will design a new residential development, Valdemars Have, in the heart of Aarhus, the second largest city in Denmark.

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Pritzker Jury: Pathway to The Stars?

2016 Pritzker Prize winner Alejandro Aravena. (Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia)

2016 Pritzker Prize winner Alejandro Aravena. (Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia)

What does it mean when the winner of the 2016 Pritzker Prize—Chile’s Alejandro Aravena—just came off the jury of the very same award? He was on the jury from 2009 to 2015 and all the jurors from 2015 (The Lord Palumbo (Chair), Alejandro Aravena, Stephen Breyer, Yung Ho Chang, Kristin Feireiss, Glenn Murcutt, Richard Rogers, Benedetta Tagliabue, and Ratan N. Tata) were on the 2016 jury—except Aravena?  Two past winners were on the jury prior to receiving the award, but won 5 years after departing. Shigeru Ban served from 2006-9 and won in 2014. While Fukihiko Maki was a juror from 1985-88 and won in 93.

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With Rams move to Inglewood comes a new HKS stadium

Architecture, Development, News, Newsletter, West
Wednesday, January 13, 2016
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A new stadium lands in Inglewood. (Courtesy HKS)

A new stadium lands in Inglewood. (Courtesy HKS)

On Tuesday, L.A. football fans had their dreams answered. NFL owners voted to approve the St. Louis Rams’ move to Los Angeles for the 2016 season, with an option for the San Diego Chargers (and perhaps the iconic Raiders) to also come to their new stadium in Inglewood designed by HKS. Read More

Alejandro Aravena of ELEMENTAL Wins 2016 Pritzker Prize

Architecture, Awards, International, Newsletter
Wednesday, January 13, 2016
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2016 Pritzker Prize winner Alejandro Aravena. (Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia)

2016 Pritzker Prize winner Alejandro Aravena. (Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia)

Alejandro Aravena of ELEMENTAL is having a banner year. The Chilean architect—and director of the upcoming 2016 Venice Biennale—has been named the winner of the 2016 Pritzker Architecture Prize. He is best known for his socially-minded approach to architecture—namely housing and disaster relief. Aravena has a number of completed projects that range from “chairs” for sitting on the ground (commissioned by Vitra) to a master plan for Santiago, Chile in the aftermath of a 2010 magnitude 8.8 earthquake and subsequent tsunami.

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Fire that engulfs Dubai skyscraper raises questions about safety of exterior cladding practices

(Christian van Elven/Flickr)

The tower before the fire. (Christian van Elven/Flickr)

A raging fire that consumed a luxury skyscraper in the United Arab Emirates on New Year’s Eve is raising concerns about the safety of a number of ultra-high towers that have come to define contemporary Dubai.

More after the jump.

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