The Good, The Bad & The Ugly: Architect builds a shocking pavilion to explore society’s domination of nature

Architecture, Art, International, On View
Tuesday, September 1, 2015
(Courtesy Atelier Van Lieshout)

(Courtesy Atelier Van Lieshout)

Bochum, Germany is host to Ruhrtriennale, a six week art festival which opened last weekend and gave Joep van Lieshout of Atelier van Lieshout a chance to create his biggest—and most shocking—work to date.

More after the jump.

On View> Psychadelic Farnsworth House installation gets a second life at a Chicago art gallery

(Kate Joyce)

(Kate Joyce)

Last year artists Petra Bachmaier and Sean Gallero led a collaborative effort to take over Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House with kaleidoscopic light and video loops. That project, INsite, followed similar work at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater and Robie House, and imbued Mies’ modernist touchstone with a vivacity often lacking in the contemporary experience of midcentury interiors. (Read AN‘s review of Luftwerk’s INsite installation here.)

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> “Some Views of Triumphal Arches” by James Michael Tate

Architecture, Art, Midwest, On View
Friday, August 28, 2015
Screen Shot 2015-08-28 at 11.10.46 AM

(Courtesy University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning)

Los Angeles–based architect James Michael Tate will offer a “speculative investigation” of one of architecture’s most enduring forms at the University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, titled Some Views of Triumphal Arches.

Continue after the jump.

Iker Gil to curate speculative Chicago projects for city’s inaugural architecture biennial

Architecture, Art, Design, Midwest, News, On View
Wednesday, August 26, 2015
Filter Island" by UrbanLab, one of the speculative proposals on display in "BOLD" at the inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial. (UrbanLab)

Filter Island” by UrbanLab, one of the speculative proposals on display in “BOLD” at the inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial. (UrbanLab)

As the Chicago Architecture Biennial‘s October opening approaches, its organizers are beginning to release details about its forthcoming exhibitions. The latest hint is an ad for BOLD, a show of “speculative proposals that re-imagine the design potential” of Chicago’s waterways, roadways, vacant lots and public space. Read More

On View> Alexander Gorlin explores the Kabbalah in his latest New York City exhibition

Art, East, On View
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
(Courtesy Sandra Gering)

(Courtesy Sandra Gering)

The Kabbalah is a Jewish mystical tradition that seeks to explain the inner workings of god and “directs initiates to an ecstatic experience of he divine.” The architect Alexander Gorlin has created Light and the Space of the Void, an exhibit that takes the idea of the tradition and focuses it on how it might be seen “either directly or indirectly in contemporary art and architecture.”

More after the jump.

Gimme Shelter: Inaugural A+D Museum exhibition promises to rethink Los Angeles housing

Pool House from Five Normal Houses: the LA River Story (Courtesy Bureau Spectacular)

Pool House from Five Normal Houses: the LA River Story (Courtesy Bureau Spectacular)

Opening August 20, Shelter: Rethinking How We Live in Los Angeles, the inaugural exhibition at the A+D Museum‘s new Arts District space presents works by architects and designers that challenge and improve upon L.A. housing typologies.

More after the jump.

Prismatic light installation to shine a light on Chicago’s Garfield Park Conservatory

Luftwerk Studio's “solarise,” will be a site-specific “series of immersive light and sculpture installations" at Chicago's Garfield Park Conservatory. (Luftwerk)

Luftwerk Studio’s “solarise,” will be a site-specific “series of immersive light and sculpture installations” at Chicago’s Garfield Park Conservatory. (Luftwerk)

Plants are usually the star of Chicago’s Garfield Park Conservatory, but a forthcoming art installation will help brighten the Jens Jensen gem with lights, mirrors and prismatic panels. Read More

Friday> See how architecture measures up at the Storefront for Art & Architecture’s new exhibit

Architecture, East, On View
Thursday, August 13, 2015
"The Storefront Impact — Measurable and Immeasurable," James Wines. Measure, 2015. (Courtesy Storefront for Art and Architecture)

“The Storefront Impact — Measurable and Immeasurable,” James Wines. Measure, 2015. (Courtesy Storefront for Art and Architecture)

Architecture today often gives shape through design to art, fashion, and real estate. But most of the most compelling architecture also gives form to thought, and, in the process, creates edifices that “houses social, political, and spatial relations.” The idea that architects make visible the functions of society in operational and aspirational terms is the theme of Measure, a new exhibition at the Storefront for Art and Architecture.

More after the jump.

Filed Under: 

This giant ball pit in New York City is all about “the transformative power of play”

Architecture, Art, East, On View
Monday, August 10, 2015
The BEACH at the National Building Museum. (NOAH KALINA)

The BEACH at the National Building Museum. (NOAH KALINA)

By now you’ve surely seen a friend or relative’s selfie from the massive ball pit at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. The installation, dubbed The BEACH, was designed by Snarkitecture and includes nearly one-million all-white, translucent, recyclable plastic balls. It’s like a McDonald’s ball pit, but artsier and probably a little bit cleaner.

Continue reading after the jump.

Bringing Street Art Back Downtown: Check out these enormous murals this weekend from New York City’s LoMan Fest

Art, East, On View
Friday, August 7, 2015

Mural by Tristan Eaton (Courtesy LoMan Festival)

Even as Lower Manhattan has become increasingly filled with luxury condos and scrubbed of its grit, it has retained the legacy and image as a cultural hub. Though many artists who once thrived in downtown have left due to skyrocketing rents and a shrinking stock of available studio and living space, the desire to keep the arts alive there has not withered for some devoted New Yorkers.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Glimmering light installation recalls the destroyed baronial towers of Bannerman’s Castle near New York City

Art, East, Lighting, On View, Preservation
Tuesday, August 4, 2015

(Rob Penner)

We head home: through the gloss of rain or weight
of snow, or the plum blush of dusk, but always—home, …
facing the stars
hope—a new constellation
waiting for us to map it,
waiting for us to name it—together.

—One Day, by Robert Blanco. Written for the second Inauguration of President Barack Obama, January 21, 2013.

Melissa McGill’s light-based public art project, Constellation, arises from the romantic ruins of Bannerman’s Castle on Pollepel Island, a mysterious sight glimpsed from trains heading north 50 miles from New York City just shy of Beacon, and nearby to West Point and Storm King. If you’ve ever wondered about this fleeting apparition, this art installation, which will be up for two years, is the perfect vehicle for visiting the island or gazing from the riverbank.

COntinue reading after the jump.

Four Boston design firms fill the Rose Kennedy Greenway with art at the intersection of architecture

(Courtesy Design Biennial Boston)

Marginal by Landing Studio. (Courtesy Design Biennial Boston)

Through September 25th, emerging architects and designers are being celebrated in Boston’s 4th Design Biennial. The program features installations, created by four, jury-chosen design firms, exhibited along the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway Conservancy.

Read More

Page 4 of 20« First...23456...1020...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.



Copyright © 2015 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License