Goth Bilbao: Moreau Kusunoki Named Winner of Guggenheim Helsinki Competition

"Art in the City" by Moreau Kusunoki Archictectes, the winning proposal for the Guggenheim Helsinki Competition. (Courtesy Moreau Kusunoki Architectes)

“Art in the City” by Moreau Kusunoki Archictectes, the winning proposal for the Guggenheim Helsinki Competition.
(Courtesy Moreau Kusunoki Architectes)

Maybe its the extra darkness in the winter. The Guggenheim Helsinki Design Competition, which famously generated an astounding 1,715 submissions, came to a conclusion today as the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation announced the winner. Parisian firm Moreau Kusunoki Architectes and its “Art in the City” proposal was chosen from six international finalists.

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AN Video> Richard Meier shows us around his model museum

Richard Meier. (AN)

Richard Meier. (AN)

Once a week, Richard Meier can be found at his model museum in the expansive Mana Contemporary arts complex in Jersey City. This is where he comes to work on collages, collaborate with screenprinter Gary Lichtenstein, and visit with his daughter Ana, who runs a furniture showroom next door.

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Count ’em: Zaha Hadid is planning to build a whopping five sinuous skyscrapers in Brisbane, Australia

International, Newsletter
Wednesday, June 17, 2015
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(Courtesy Sunland Group)

(Courtesy Sunland Group)

Pritzker Prize laureate Zaha Hadid recently unveiled plans for twin towers fronting Mariner’s Cove along the Gold Coast of Brisbane, Australia. The two 44-story mixed-use towers will combine 370 highrise living units and a 69-suite boutique hotel with what developer Sunland Group bills as the region’s “first privately-owned cultural precinct.”

Continue reading after the jump.

ODA reveals Eliot Spitzer–developed stack of boxes in Williamsburg inspired by icebergs

(Courtesy ODA)

(Courtesy ODA)

Stacked boxes are all the architectural rage these days—from Bjarke Ingels’ Two World Trade, to ODA’s Midtown skyscraper, to ODA’s Financial District skyscraper, to ODA’s Bushwick residential project, to ODA’s Williamsburg condos, to ODA’s other boxy buildings in Long Island City, Harlem, and the Lower East Side. It should surprise nobody, then, that ODA‘s latest project will stay true to the firm’s trademark form.

Continue reading after the jump.

Daniel Libeskind plans three “interlocking” towers in Rome’s Tor di Valle district as part of urbanizing masterplan

(Courtesy Studio Libeskind)

(Courtesy Studio Libeskind)

Designs revealed by starchitect Daniel Libeskind for a trio of office towers in Rome’s Tor di Valle district beget interlocking building blocks, despite varying in height and shape.

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Tadao Ando opens up about his first New York City building, architecture as living light, and an early career in professional boxing

Architecture, East, Newsletter
Thursday, June 11, 2015
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Rendering of Ando's 152 Elizabeth. (Courtesy Sumaida & Khurana)

Rendering of Ando’s 152 Elizabeth. (Courtesy Sumaida & Khurana)

New York developers Sumaida & Khurana are breaking architectural ground with a series of residential buildings in New York City designed by architects who have never built there before. Their first is a seven-unit beaut by Tadao Ando—called ICHIGONI (152) or 152 Elizabeth—set to bring glass-smooth concrete and highly detailed steel to Manhattan’s Nolita neighborhood. And now Ando is opening up about its design.

Watch the video after the jump.

Fumihiko Maki says architects who know better should speak up in the public’s interest

Fumihiko Maki addresses the Japan Society in New York. (James Way)

Fumihiko Maki addresses the Japan Society in New York. (James Way)

Octogenarian Fumihiko Maki shows no signs of slowing down, based on his presentation last night at the Japan Society in New York City. Going back as far as only the mid-1990s, the Pritzker Prize winner showed a handful of projects that, as moderator Toshiko Mori said, eschew a signature style yet are identifiably Maki buildings.

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With Foster rebuffed, Bjarke Ingels reveals his plans for a stepped Two World Trade Center

(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy DBOX/BIG)

In late 2005, Norman Foster unveiled his design for Two World Trade Center—an 88-story tower capped in four diamonds to direct the eye down toward the 9/11 Memorial, which, at the time, was still years from completion. Then, the World Trade Center site was still in the design phase, and Bjarke Ingels was a little-known architect from Denmark.

But a lot can change in a decade.

The Frick Collection cancels controversial expansion plan by Davis Brody Bond

Frick Collection expansion plans. (Courtesy Davis Brody Bond.)

Frick Collection expansion plans. (Courtesy Davis Brody Bond)

The Frick Collection has called off its controversial expansion plan, reports the New York Times. The surprising news comes one year after the museum unveiled a scheme by David Brody Bond to build a six-story addition and fill in its beloved Russell Page Garden. Removing the garden (and replacing it with a new rooftop garden) did not sit well with preservationists who came out swinging against the expansion.

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Have your LEGOs and eat them, too: Here’s how to make edible, stackable LEGO gummy candies

Design, International, Newsletter
Wednesday, June 3, 2015
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(Courtesy Grant Thompson, YouTube)

(Courtesy Grant Thompson, YouTube)

YouTube vlogger Grant Thompson aka ‘King of Random’ recently broke the internet with a how-to video for concocting edible, stackable LEGO gummy candies.

Watch how after the jump.

Piece by piece, Watch as New York City’s first micro-unit housing complex by nArchitects takes shape

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

New York City‘s first-ever entirely micro-unit housing complex is being stacked together on Manhattan‘s East Side. Back in February, we wrote that the modules for the nARCHITECTS-designed building were being assembled at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and now we can report that they have begun arriving at their permanent home in Kips Bay.

Watch the video after the jump.

Architects will soon suspend this cellulose fiber canopy made from discarded paper in Boston

(Image courtesy of Bigger than a Breadbox competition)

(Image courtesy of Bigger than a Breadbox competition)

Recognizing architects’ increased use of installations for experimentation and prototyping, the “Bigger than a Breadbox, Smaller than a Building” competition awards project proposals that use the medium for spatial exploration.

Continue reading after the jump.

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