Renderings finally revealed for the base of the Western Hemisphere’s tallest tower

Architecture, East, News
Friday, February 12, 2016
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(Courtesy Nordstrom)

Central Park Tower at 217 West 57th Street. (Courtesy Nordstrom)

With all the attention focused on the impossible height of New York‘s new crop of supertalls, it’s easy to forget that even skyscrapers have a tether to earth. Renderings were recently revealed for the base of Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill‘s 1,550-foot-tower, which, when complete, will be the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. Read More

Milwaukee’s Mitchell Park Domes closed indefinitely amid safety concerns

Mitchell_Park_Horticultural_Conservatory

The three Mitchell Park Domes each hold a different plant biosphere. (By Sulfurd/Wikimedia Commons)

The Mitchell Park Domes have been an iconic and well-loved part of the Milwaukee skyline for several generations.  As of February 9th, the Domes are closed to the public amidst reports of falling concrete, and their future is unknown.

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Two groups renew the effort to save the all-concrete Miami Marine Stadium

East, News, Preservation
Friday, February 12, 2016
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The Miami Marine Stadium. (Courtesy Rick Bravo/National Trust for Historic Preservation)

The Miami Marine Stadium. (Courtesy Rick Bravo/National Trust for Historic Preservation)

Can decay on the Bay be forestalled? In 2014, a local group floated the idea of murals, and now, two nonprofits, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Dade Heritage Trust, are renewing efforts to restore the Miami Marine Stadium on Biscayne Bay.

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Back to the Future: New York City explores streetcar transit route linking outer boroughs

City Terrain, East, News, Transportation, Urbanism
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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(Friends of the Brooklyn Queens Connector)

(Friends of the Brooklyn Queens Connector)

Remember the New York City streetcar? Unless you’re a New Yorker of a certain age, you definitely don’t. Advances in transportation technology (what die-hard conspiracy theorists refer to as Great American Streetcar Scandal) drove streetcars all over the U.S. straight to the last stop. Yet, it’s now very possible that two neighboring boroughs, Brooklyn and Queens, will be reunited once again via a new streetcar line of their very own.

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Count ’em: After upzoning, developer proposes eleven new buildings for downtown Portland

Development, News, Skyscrapers, West
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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The Ankeny Block future development possibilities (Downtown Development Group)

The Ankeny Block future development possibilities (Downtown Development Group)

The City of Roses may get a flurry of major developments downtown. The plan: Portland’s Downtown Development Group, headed by the Goodman family, has proposed eleven buildings representing a $1.5 billion investment in the city.

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Norman Foster breaks ground on his expansion for Florida’s Norton Museum of Art

Architecture, Art, East, News, Newsletter
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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(Courtesy Foster + Partners)

(Courtesy Foster + Partners)

Commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Norton Museum of Art in Palm Beach, British architect Norman Foster was on site to see his expansion break ground. The new development, called “The New Norton,” will see further galleries added along with visitor facilities all within the “original axial layout of the Museum.”

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Apple shows love to New York’s historic neighborhoods and the Landmarks Conservancy takes notice

Awards, East, News, Preservation
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Apple store on Fifth Avenue. (Rick González / Flickr)

Apple store on Fifth Avenue. (Rick González / Flickr)

The New York Landmarks Conservancy is honoring Apple with its 2016 Chairman’s Award. The award, to be given at a fundraising luncheon where individual tickets start at $500, honors the company for “their contribution to preserving, restoring, and repurposing notable historic structures in New York City.”

Continue reading after the jump.

The 16th Serpentine Pavilion will be designed by Bjarke Ingels, with four accompanying Summer Houses

The Denmark Pavilion at the Shanghai Expo 2010. (Iwan Baan / Courtesy Serpentine Galleries)

The Denmark Pavilion at the Shanghai Expo 2010. (Iwan Baan / Courtesy Serpentine Galleries)

Bjarke Ingels has come a long way since he designed the Denmark Pavilion, pictured above, for the Shanghai Expo 2010. His eponymous Copenhagen- and New York–based firm BIG, the Bjarke Ingels Group, today deals with skyscrapers and other large-scale projects in major cities around the world. But this summer, the firm will take a step back to design the 16th Serpentine Pavilion in Kensington Gardens, London.

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University of Arkansas named inaugural recipient of el dorado prize

Awards, Midwest, News
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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DSC02556_edited

Select students from the Fay Jones School of Architecture at the University of Kansas will have the opportunity to learn el dorado’s work process as summer interns. (Courtesy el dorado)

The University of Arkansas Fay Jones School of Architecture & Design will be the inaugural recipient of the annual el dorado Prize. The distinction is sponsored by the Kansas City–based architecture firm el dorado as part of its 20th anniversary.

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Goldstein, Hill & West Architects designs Long Island City’s tallest tower yet

Architecture, Development, East, News
Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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(Courtesy United Construction and Development)

(Courtesy United Construction and Development)

Goldstein, Hill & West Architects (GHWA), in partnership with developer Chris Xu, just unleashed a 79-story residential tower on Long Island City, Queens. At 963 feet tall, the tower will be 305 feet taller than its neighbor, CitiGroup‘s 50-story One Court Square, already one of the tallest buildings in the neighborhood.

Read More

Arquitectonica gets real wavy with new seaside tower in Florida

Architecture, East, News, Skyscrapers, Unveiled
Tuesday, February 9, 2016
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(Courtesy Arquitectonica)

(Courtesy Arquitectonica)

Arquitectonica tests the surf with ocean-influenced Regalia, a newly unveiled 488-foot-tall luxury condo in Sunny Isles, a city northeast of Miami. But the Florida skyscraper is leaving us with a distinct sense of déjà vu.

More after the jump.

Right on trend, the oldest mall in America is reborn as micro-apartments

Architecture, East, News, Preservation
Monday, February 8, 2016
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(Courtesy Ben Jacobsen / NCA)

(Courtesy Ben Jacobsen / NCA)

Search Twitter for #mallmonday and see a hilariously bleak photo series that profiles different malls, some dead, some impossibly sad, each week. Why are these depressing spaces so popular with architects? By giving new life to these huge, redundant spaces, architects tap into ruinophilia to feed a culturally ingrained desire for dramatic transformation and also temper the excesses of capitalism, maybe.

In the Texas capital, Austin Community College annexed semi-vacant Highland Mall for a new campus, while NBBJ is reviving a dead mall in downtown Columbus.

In Providence, Rhode Island, Northeast Collaborative Architects (NCA) handily combined dead mall revivification with micro-apartments, for an timely transformation of downtown’s Arcade Providence, the oldest shopping mall in the United States.

Read More

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