Renzo Piano wraps up construction of the Energy Canopy at Athens’ enormous Cultural Center

SNFCC Energy Canopy (Yiorgis Yerolymbos)

SNFCC Energy Canopy (Yiorgis Yerolymbos)

For years, Renzo Piano has been working to complete his design for the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Cultural Center in Greece. Not, the cultural group behind the project has announced that a key component of the Visitor’s Center, the energy canopy, is now complete.

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Bjarke Ingels’ Lego House museum tops out in Billund, Denmark

(Courtesy BIG)

(Courtesy BIG)

In Lego‘s hometown of Billund, Denmark, 3,000 residents came together to celebrate the topping out of the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) Lego House. Devoted to the international company, the buildings modular aesthetic is derived from the signature Lego toy bricks. Read More

Take a tour inside Snøhetta’s SFMOMA before it opens in May 2016

SFMOMA (Gregory Hurcomb)

SFMOMA (Gregory Hurcomb)

“The building is not static—it is designed to gracefully mature over time as life and art move forward together,” said Snøhetta’s Craig Dykers poetically wrapped up his opening remarks at the pre-launch event of their heralded new addition to the SFMOMA, which is slated to open May 14, 2016.

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A circular bridge will go up this November over Uruguay’s beautiful Laguna Garzon, connecting two formerly remote shores

(Courtesy Rafael Vinoly Architects)

(Courtesy Rafael Vinoly Architects)

If conservatives bristle at building a bridge over a UNESCO World Heritage Site, just make it circular. This ring-shaped bridge by architect Rafael Viñoly will superimpose the Laguna Garzon, its circular design meant to minimize its environmental and visual impact by recalling a winding road—plus the fact that it uniquely affords veritable 360-degree views.

More after the jump.

Here’s how Morris Adjmi’s ghostly aluminum carbon copy of a warehouse in Tribeca is shaping up

(Courtesy Field Condition)

(Courtesy Field Condition)

On a prime Tribeca corner, Morris Adjmi has transformed an early 19th century coffee and tea warehouse into a fancy condo building—and built a mirror-image replica of the stately structure right next to it. Well, almost.

Continue reading after the jump.

The tallest crane ever in New York City was just installed to build SHoP’s Manhattan supertall

(Courtesy SHoP)

(Courtesy SHoP)

The tallest freestanding crane ever erected in New York City is now in place to help SHoP‘s bronze, glass, and terracotta 57th Street tower rise to 1,428 feet.

More after the jump.

Piece by piece, Watch as New York City’s first micro-unit housing complex by nArchitects takes shape

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

Rendering of Carmel Place. (Courtesy nARCHITECTS)

New York City‘s first-ever entirely micro-unit housing complex is being stacked together on Manhattan‘s East Side. Back in February, we wrote that the modules for the nARCHITECTS-designed building were being assembled at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and now we can report that they have begun arriving at their permanent home in Kips Bay.

Watch the video after the jump.

Watch One World Trade, New York City’s tallest skyscraper, rise in less than two minutes

One World Trade Center. (AN)

One World Trade Center. (AN)

With the recent opening of One World Trade Center, the folks over at EarthCam have reshared their 2013 timelapse of the tower’s 1,776 foot rise. There’s not too much else to say about the video, other than that it sure makes the building’s very long and arduous climb seem pretty quick and easy. It’s also set to some very Game of Thrones-y music, so it has that going for it too.

Watch the video after the jump.

AN Video> Take an exclusive look inside The Beekman, one of the world’s first skyscrapers

5 Beekman. (The Architect's Newspaper)

5 Beekman. (The Architect’s Newspaper)

A few blocks south of City Hall in Manhattan is 5 Beekman—one of New York City’s most intriguing historic landmarks. Behind the building’s brick facade is an ornate, nine-story, glass-pyramid-topped atrium that has been off limits for more than a decade. The Architect’s Newspaper took a behind-the-scenes tour of the building with the architect who is bringing it back to life as a boutique hotel.

Watch the video after the jump.

Here’s a sneak peek inside Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “courtscraper”

W 57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

W 57. (Courtesy Field Condition)

The construction-watching site Field Condition recently got to step inside New York City’s most anticipated new building. Yes, of course we are talking about Bjarke Ingels‘ pyramid-like W57 that is scheduled to open next year. As we have written recently, the structure has topped out and its enclosure is well on its way, but we’re just now getting a sense of what things will look like inside.

Take a look inside the building after the jump.

Sandhogs continue to make progress on New York City’s enormous $11 billion East Side train tunnel

(MTA Capital Construction / Rehema Trimiew)

(MTA Capital Construction / Rehema Trimiew)

New York City’s MTA has posted another collection of East Side Access construction photos to remind New Yorkers that its majorly delayed and hugely over budget project is still actually chugging along. When East Side Access is ultimately completed, at the cost of nearly $11 billion, it will connect Long Island Rail Road trains to Grand Central making life easier for about 80,000 commuters. But that’s a long ways off—last we heard, the project will not be completed until 2023.

Check out construction progress after the jump.

Pictorial> Facade rising at Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “courtscraper”

(Courtesy Field Condition)

(Courtesy Field Condition)

One of the most interesting buildings to ever rise in New York City is getting closer and closer to the finish line. We are of course talking about W57Bjarke Ingels‘ pyramid, or rather, “courtscraper,” on Manhattan‘s Far West Side.

Take a look at construction progress after the jump.

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