Archtober Building of the Day 1> Collaborative Research Center, Rockefeller University

Architecture, City Terrain, East
Thursday, October 1, 2015
.

10_1-045_001
(Courtesy Julia Cohen)

Archtober Building of the Day #01
Collaborative Research Center, Rockefeller University
1230 York Avenue, Manhattan
Mitchell | Giurgola Architects

We’re off! Our first Building of the Day in our fifth year is a showplace for understanding the architect as problem solver and the collaborative nature of the profession. The tour was led by Paul Broches, partner at Mitchell | Giurgola, and Jillian Sheedy, senior associate. Carol Loewenson, AIANY 2016 President-elect, joined in as well. Broches told our group of enthusiasts that each of the scientists was individually interviewed to determine the specific requirements for their laboratories. What a challenge to find general solutions to their complex problems—very nicely done—and it received a citation from AIA New York State in 2013.

Read More

Landscape architect Nicholas Quennell shares life-work insights in video

Nicholas Quennell (right) with Lawrence Halprin in San Francisco.

Nicholas Quennell (right) with Lawrence Halprin in
San Francisco. (Courtesy The Cultural Landscape Foundation.)

The Cultural Landscape Foundation just released the latest installment in their Pioneers Oral History series with a 64-minute interview-style documentary with landscape architect Nicholas Quennell.

Read More

Boston considers supply-and-demand logic to price parking in prime areas

Congestion has always been an issue in Boston: traffic on the Harvard Bridge, 1923 (Courtesy Boston Public Library)

Congestion has always been an issue in Boston: traffic on the Harvard Bridge, 1923 (Courtesy Boston Public Library)

Boston-area drivers spend too much time stuck in traffic. To combat congestion in the city center, Boston city officials may follow San Francisco’s move to improve traffic flow by charging more for parking at peak times.

More after the jump.

You Know I’d Bike 1,000 Miles: New York City celebrates milestone achievement in bike infrastructure

City Terrain, East, News, Transportation
Friday, September 25, 2015
.
Marking the 1,000th mile of bike lane on Clinton Street (Courtesy NYC DOT)

Marking the 1,000th mile on Clinton Street (Courtesy NYC DOT)

The New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) announced this week that it has created 1,000 miles of bike lanes (map) across the five boroughs. The 1,000th mile, on which just opened along Clinton Street in Lower Manhattan, is one of twelve new miles planned for 2015.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City’s Citi Bike bike-share system expands into New Jersey

City Terrain, East, News, Transportation
Wednesday, September 23, 2015
.
(Courtesy Joe Mazzola / Flickr)

(Courtesy Joe Mazzola / Flickr)

Bike sharing is a trend that is taking the country by storm of late as Jersey City, New Jersey, jumps on the biking bandwagon installing 35 docking stations for 350 bicycles.

Read More

21 Winners Chosen for Federal Transit-Oriented Development Planning Grants

City Terrain, National, News, Transportation
Wednesday, September 23, 2015
.
(Courtesy DoT)

(Courtesy DOT)

Twenty one planning projects have been awarded over $19 million between them by the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) in a bid to boost transportation infrastructure funding.

Read More

Downtown Cleveland Alliance taps Chicago’s PORT to reinvent a shadowy underpass

Renderings of a plan to remake the Main Avenue Bridge underpass in Cleveland. (PORT)

Renderings of a plan to remake the Main Avenue Bridge underpass in Cleveland. (PORT)

Chicago-based PORT Urbanism will work with the Downtown Cleveland Alliance to turn a forbidding underpass near Cleveland‘s warehouse district into a vibrant pedestrian space, now that the Chicago-based firm has been selected as the winner of a design competition to revive the Main Avenue Bridge. Read More

Pictorial> The Hills come alive on Governors Island

View from the path leading up to Outlook Hill (Audrey Wachs / AN)

View from the path leading up to Outlook Hill (Audrey Wachs / AN)

Standing near the top of Outlook Hill, Leslie Koch, president of The Trust for Governors Island, explained the reason for commissioning four huge earth mounds on an island in the middle of New York Harbor. “Most New Yorkers don’t experience that fancy view [of the skyline]. You don’t get to see the city on high from the city that created views.” The Hills, part of a $220 million renovation of Governors Island, do create new ways of viewing the city and its surroundings.

Continue reading after the jump.

Diana Balmori launches a vegetated island floating along Brooklyn’s toxic Gowanus Canal

(Branden Klayko / AN)

(Branden Klayko / AN)

Landscape architect Diana Balmori has been planting floating gardens and launching them into the middle of Brooklyn‘s Gowanus Canal only to have the plant life killed off by the Superfund site‘s toxic waters. “We’ve been working on this a year,” she told AN today along the canal’s edge looking at GrowOnUs, her latest floating landscape. “We did three test plantings, but they all died in the canal.”

Continue reading after the jump.

West 8 to remake a boulevard in Rotterdam into a pedestrian and cyclist–oriented thoroughfare

Renderings of the Coolsingel. Courtesy West 8

Renderings of the Coolsingel. (Courtesy West 8)

This month, Adriaan Visser of Rotterdam‘s city council and Adriaan Geuze, principal of landscape architecture firm West 8, unveiled a new plan for the municipality’s 0.6 mile long Coolsingel. The streetscape aims to restore the allure of the 19th century boulevard which once defined the area.

More after the jump.

Report: Red tape and deferred maintenance balloon U.S. infrastructure costs to $3.7 trillion

City Terrain, National, News, Transportation
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
.
The overhead steel truss on a pair of I-5 bridges spanning the Skookumchuck River in Washington State is one piece of infrastructure getting overdue repairs. Hits from overheight loads will be fixed and the overhead clearance will be straightened out to and even height across all lanes. (Washington State Department of Transportation)

The overhead steel truss on a pair of I-5 bridges spanning the Skookumchuck River in Washington State is one piece of infrastructure getting overdue repairs. Hits from overheight loads will be fixed and the overhead clearance will be straightened out to and even height across all lanes. (Washington State Department of Transportation via Flickr)

A new report attempts to quantify the cost of our national reluctance to fix aging bridges, railroads and power lines. Delays in approving infrastructure projects cost the United States some $3.7 trillion, according to the nonpartisan think tank Common Good—more than twice what it would take to fix the infrastructure in the first place, according to a report titled Two Years, Not Ten Years: Redesigning Infrastructure Approvals.

Continue reading after the jump.

Boomtown: Houston poised to overtake Chicago as country’s third-largest city by 2025

Downtown Houston. (eflon / Wikimedia Commons)

Downtown Houston. (eflon / Wikimedia Commons)

The Texas metropolis of Houston is famous (or perhaps infamous) for its sprawling footprint. But as recent census numbers affirm, that growth reflects more than just a lack of zoning—within 10 years, more people will live in Houston than Chicago, according to information from health departments in Illinois and Texas. (Read AN‘s feature examining Houston’s first General Plan here.)

Continue reading after the jump.

Page 6 of 46« First...45678...203040...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.

Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2015 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License