SHoP Architects’ Dancing Towers Break Ground on First Avenue in New York

East, Newsletter
Friday, August 2, 2013
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First Avenue Development (Courtesy of SHoP Architects)

First Avenue Development (Courtesy of SHoP Architects)

After a decade-long wait, construction commenced in late July on a pair of conjoined rental towers designed by SHoP Architects on an empty parcel on First Avenue between 35th and 36th Streets. The New York Times reported that the two copper buildings, consisting of 800 units and reaching up to 49 and 40 stories, will be connected by a sky bridge. The luxury development will boast high-end amenities and facilities such as  indoor lap pool, rooftop deck with infinity pool, fitness center, squash court, and film screening room.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City Rep Velázquez Announces Bill to Improve & Protect Waterfront

City Terrain, East
Thursday, August 1, 2013
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View of East River. (Nicole Anderson/AN)

View of East River. (Nicole Anderson/AN)

Taking the podium at Pier 6 in Brooklyn Bridge Park, New York City Representative Nydia M. Velázquez introduced new legislation, called the “Waterfront of Tomorrow Act,” to protect and fortify New York City’s 538-miles of coastline. The bill would instruct the Army Corps of Engineers to come up with an in-depth plan to stimulate economic growth and job creation, update the ports, and implement flood protection measures. Sandwiched between Red Hook Container Terminal and One Brooklyn Bridge Park, a large residential development, the pier was an appropriate place for the Congresswoman to announce legislation that addresses the city’s needs to bolster its shipping industry while also taking steps to mitigate flooding and ensure the resiliency and sustainability of its residential neighborhoods, parkland, and businesses.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York Restoration Project Jumpstarts Design Competition with Selection of Eight Local Firms

East
Wednesday, July 31, 2013
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Former Boat Club Site in Sherman Creek Park to be retrofitted as EDGEucation Pavilion (Courtesy of Anne Tan/NYRP)

Former Boat Club Site in Sherman Creek Park to be turned into EDGEucation Pavilion (Courtesy of Anne Tan/NYRP)

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, architects have been called to arms to both engage in the immediate recovery efforts and to come up with design solutions that will make New York City’s buildings more resilient and sustainable in the long-term. The latest in a flood of new Sandy-inspired design initiatives was launched yesterday by New York Restoration Project (NYRP), dubbed “EDGE/ucation Pavillion Design Competition,” asking a group of hand-picked, up-and-coming architecture firms to create a storm-resistant pavilion in Sherman Creek Park right on the Harlem River.

Continue reading after the jump.

France’s FRAC Centre to Open New Tubular Prefabricated Center

(Nicolas Borel  / Courtesy Jakob + MacFarlane)

(Nicolas Borel / Courtesy Jakob + MacFarlane)

The Fonds Régional d’Art Contemporain, known as the FRAC, will open its fourth location at the former Subsistances military site in the Centre Region on September 14th. The Orleans-based center dubbed “The Turbulences” is the brainchild of architecture duo, Jakob + MacFarlane, who have renovated the original U-shaped military base and created a bold prefabricated  structure in the middle of the courtyard to house the public reception area, cafeteria, bookshop, and auditorium.

Continue reading after the jump.

Not So Green: Greenpoint to Lose Park During Highway Construction

City Terrain, East
Tuesday, July 30, 2013
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Sgt. William Dougherty Park (Courtesy of NYC Parks Department)

Sgt. William Dougherty Park (Courtesy of NYC Parks Department)

Originally named for its once thick forests and lush meadows, the former industrial neighborhood of Greenpoint, Brooklyn now has a real shortage of green space. The Brooklyn Paper reported that parkland will only grow scarcer with the pending closure of Sgt. William Dougherty Park, located on the corner of Cherry Street and Vandervoort Avenue, as soon as the state begins its four-year construction project to replace the Kosciuszko Bridge.

Greenpointers have expressed concern about the temporary loss of the park, and Assemblyman Joe Lentol has asked the lawmakers in Albany to allocate a portion of the funding reserved for the bridge construction to building a new park. One local resident has already scouted out a possible location at an empty five-acre parcel on Kingsland Avenue between Greenpoint and Norman avenues.

NYC Passes Zoning For Commercial Development on Governors Island.  Governors Island (Courtesy of The Trust Governors Island) Yesterday City Council green lighted new zoning to allow commercial development in 40 historic structures on Governors Island. This change will introduce restaurants and retail establishments to the sleepy, mostly park-filled island, and also help to generate revenue for the upkeep and operations of the island’s parkland. One stipulation of the rezoning is a commitment from The Trust for Governors Island to use union labor for all construction projects. (Photo: Courtesy Trust for Governors Island)

 

Ground Broken On West 8–Designed “Hill Park” on Governors Island

East
Thursday, July 25, 2013
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Renderings of The Hills on Governors Island (Courtesy of the Mayor's Office)

Renderings of The Hills on Governors Island (Courtesy of the Mayor’s Office)

In just a few years, visitors will stand atop an 80-foot-tall hill on Governors Island and enjoy sweeping vistas of New York Harbor, the Statue of Liberty, and the Manhattan skyline. Today Mayor Bloomberg broke ground on The Hills, a new 11-acre stretch of green space, that is part of Governors Island Park, and one feature of landscape architecture firm West 8’s expansive 30-acre Public Space Master Plan that was first unveiled in 2010.

Continue reading after the jump.

Final Decision: City Council Votes for 10-Year Permit for MSG.  Madison Square Garden (Courtesy of doriandsp/Flickr) This afternoon City Council voted 47-1 to limit Madison Square Garden’s permit to 10 years. The arena, sitting atop Penn Station, had requested a permit in perpetuity, but a coalition of government officials, preservationists, and transportation advocates protested and pushed for a truncated 10-year renewal. Critics hope this term limit will ultimately encourage the re-location of the Garden to allow for a complete overhaul of the train station and an improved arena. According to DNA Info, the station is “North America’s busiest rail station,” and many have argued that it is beyond capacity and poses a safety risk for commuters. (Photo: doriandsp/Flickr)      

 

June Architecture Billings Index Show Numbers Are Still on the Rise

National
Wednesday, July 24, 2013
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BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

Numbers are staying strong. AIA’s Architecture Billing Index for the month of June has revealed steady, but positive growth. The June ABI score of 51.6 reflected only a slight drop from May’s score of 52.9, and still indicates a general upswing for the non-residential construction industry. More projects will likely be on the horizon. The new projects inquiry index reported a significant climb in numbers to 62.6 from 59.1 the previous month.

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New Zoning Could Bring Restaurants, Shops, and a Hotel to Governors Island

East
Tuesday, July 23, 2013
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Nolan Houses on Governors Island (Courtesy of the Trust for Governors Island )

Nolan Houses on Governors Island (Courtesy of the Trust for Governors Island )

Only a little over decade ago, Governors Island was a sleepy coast guard base just a stone’s throw from Lower Manhattan, but it has since become a destination for New Yorkers offering a slew of recreational activities, events, and new park land. Now the idyllic island could be populated by a new hotel along with restaurants, retail, and other commercial development.

Continue reading after the jump.

New York City Tweaks Midtown East Rezoning Plan to Allow More Residences

East
Tuesday, July 23, 2013
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View of East Midtown Manhattan (Courtesy of Cristian/Flickr)

View of East Midtown Manhattan (Courtesy of Cristian/Flickr)

Since Mayor Bloomberg’s plan to rezone midtown east was first announced, it has stirred debate among local stakeholders, preservationists, and advocacy groups. Now Department of City Planning has offered up a set of new amendments—in the “A Text” section of the proposal—that responds to some of these key concerns expressed by New Yorkers while also serving the primary goal of the rezoning:  To support and boost the growth of midtown’s competitive office district.

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Five NYC Mayoral Candidates Camp Out in Public Housing for One Night.  NYCHA Housing (Courtesy of eastcolfax/Flickr) Mayor candidates experienced first hand just what it is like to live in New York City public housing this Saturday. DNA Info reported that Reverend Al Sharpton, affiliated with the National Action Network, organized a sleepover for five of the contenders: Bill de Blasio, John Liu, Christine Quinn, Bill Thompson, and Anthony Weiner. The mayoral hopefuls camped out overnight in sleeping bags in the Lincoln Houses in East Harlem. New York City Public Housing Authority (NYCHA) has been plagued by budget cuts and a 4000,000 back log of repairs, only exacerbated by the damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. (Photo: eastcolfax/Flickr)

 

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