New Bill to Allow Developments to Rise along Manhattan’s Hudson River Park

City Terrain, East
Monday, November 18, 2013
.
Pier 40 at Hudson River Park (Courtesy of Martin Wippel/Flickr)

Pier 40 at Hudson River Park (Courtesy of Martin Wippel/Flickr)

Buildings will soon rise to new heights alongManhattan’s Hudson River Park. Governor Cuomo just signed legislation to allow the cash-strapped park to sell 1.6 million square feet in air rights to developers. The bill will enable developers to build new projects one block from the five-mile waterfront park, which can now include commercial tenants, schools, performing art organizations and venues, and TV film and media studios.

Continue reading after the jump.

SHoP Architects’ Massive Domino Sugar Redevelopment Moves Forward

East
Monday, November 4, 2013
.
Domino Sugar Factory Redevelopment Plan (Courtesy of SHoP Architects)

Domino Sugar Factory Redevelopment Plan (Courtesy of SHoP Architects)

Today New York City Department of City Planning certified the application for Two Trees’ major redevelopment plans for the iconic Domino Sugar Factory site along the Williamsburg waterfront in Brooklyn, marking the start of the six-month public review process. Two Trees purchased the 11-acre property from developer CPC Resources, and is seeking to bump up the height of the buildings from the previously approved plan of 3.1 million square feet of space to 3.3 million square feet, add 500,000 square feet of office space, and dramatically increase the amount of open space. The developer enlisted SHoP Architects to design the plan. Last March, the developer unveiled their plans, which included a series flashy doughnut-shaped towers.

City Council Gives Staten Island’s New York Wheel the Green Light.  (Courtesy NYC Mayor’s Office)(Courtesy NYC Mayor’s Office) It is official. The world’s tallest Ferris wheel will rise on Staten Island‘s waterfront. Today, New York City Council approved the New York Wheel, a mixed-use development project, designed by Perkins Eastman. The project will include a 100,000-square foot Terminal building in addition to retail, restaurants, open space, entertainment, and a 950-parking garage. The structure will implement green design strategies and  feature wind turbines and solar panels. Construction will commence in 2014 and be completed by 2016.  

 

New York City Gearing Up For New Bike Lane on Pulaski Bridge.  Pulaski Bridge (Courtesy of Newyorkshitty) Now that Citi Bikes are taking over the streets of New York City, the NYC Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) is getting ready to pave the way for a new bike pathThe Daily News reported that the NYCDOT plans on creating a new dedicated bike lane on the Pulaski Bridge, the connection between Greenpoint and Long Island City, by 2014. Currently pedestrians and cyclists share a crowded path, but soon a single traffic lane will be turned into a bike path. An engineering study of the bridge will include this addition and be unveiled to the Community Boards in Queens and Brooklyn in the next few months. (Photo: Courtesy Newyorkshitty)

 

Rebuild by Design> Ten Proposals for a Resilient East Coast Revealed

City Terrain, East
Tuesday, October 29, 2013
.
SCAPE/Landscape Architecture's proposal (Courtesy of SCAPE/Landscape Architecture)

SCAPE/Landscape Architecture’s proposal. (Courtesy SCAPE/Landscape Architecture)

A year ago, Hurricane Sandy swept through the East coast—destroying thousands of homes, shutting down infrastructure, and knocking out substations—which resulted in $68 billion in damage. Yesterday, a day before the anniversary of the super storm, ten finalists in the Rebuild by Design competition  unveiled their proposals to remake a more resilient coastline. The competition—launched by Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), among other participating organizations—called on the final teams to provide ideas for making the affected coastal areas more resilient to withstand future storms and climate change.

View the proposals after the jump.

First Glimpse of New York’s Latest Super-Tall Skyscraper by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill

East
Friday, October 25, 2013
.
A first peek at Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill's New York City tower. (Courtesy CB 5 / AS+GG)

A first peek at Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill’s New York City tower. (Courtesy CB 5 / AS+GG)

A new condo tower designed by Chicago-based Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill was announced late last year, but details of the super-tall tower have been scant. The 88-story tower at 215 West 57th Street will be one of New York City’s tallest buildings, reaching up to 1,550 feet. That means it will top the Empire State Building’s measly 1,454 feet and come in second only to the 1,776-foot-tall One World Trade Center. (If you’re paying attention to the spire / antenna semantics game ongoing at One World Trade, AS+GG’s new tower would beat its midtown rival by a little over 200 feet.) Adrian Smith is no stranger to designing soaring skyscrapers—he designed Dubai’s Burj Khalifa while working at SOM, still the tallest tower in the world. The architects declined to comment further about the tower.

 

 

September Billings Report Show Steady Positive Growth for Architecture Economy

National
Thursday, October 24, 2013
.
BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

BILLINGS (BLUE) AND INQUIRIES (RED) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

The slow days of the recession are long gone. Recent figures indicate that September was another robust month for the architecture industry. The Architecture Billings Index (ABI) rose from 53.8 in August to 54.3 (any score above 50 indicates an increase in billings).  AIA Chief Economist Kermit Baker said that this upswing in the demand for design services is a reflection of the industry’s new and advanced design and business practices. “The prolonged economic downturn that has affected the design and construction industry has actually resulted in the increased productivity levels as reported by architecture firms,” Baker said.

Continue reading after the jump.

Stockholm-based White Arkitekter Wins FAR ROC Design Competition

City Terrain, East
Wednesday, October 23, 2013
.
White Arkitekter's winning proposal (Courtesy of White Arkitekter)

White Arkitekter’s winning proposal (Courtesy of White Arkitekter)

Sweden-based firm White Arkitekter has been named the winner of the “For a Resilient Rockaway” (FAR ROC) design competition. The team’s winning proposal, Small Means & Great End, offers a set of design strategies to transform an empty swath of land, known as Averne East, along the Rockaways in Queens, New York into a resilient, mixed-use community.

The New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD), along with private developers and the AIA New York Chapter,  shortlisted four finalists back in July, including Ennead Architects, Lateral Office, and Seeding Office.

Continue reading after the jump.

Boston Unveils New Map of “The T” Subway System

Winner of New Perspectives Map Re-design Competition by Mikheil Kvrivishvili (Courtesy of MBTA/Mikheil Kvrivishvili)

Winner of New Perspectives Map Re-design Competition by Mikheil Kvrivishvili (Courtesy of MBTA/Mikheil Kvrivishvili)

Navigating Boston’s subway system, known as “The T,” will soon be a cinch with the help of a new map designed by Mikheil Kvrivishvili. The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) named the Moscow-based interactive/graphic designer the winner of its “New Perspectives Map Re-design Competition” after receiving 6,837 out of the 17,045 votes cast by the public. A panel of experts—composed of MBTA officials, academics, urban planners, and cartographers—selected six finalists from a pool of dozens of applicants. Members of the public then voted online for their favorite design.

Continue reading after the jump.

City Council Takes Legal Action to Halt NYCHA’s Infill Strategy

East
Friday, October 11, 2013
.
The Carver Houses (Courtesy Bing Maps)

The Carver Houses (Courtesy Bing Maps)

New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) just faced another hurdle in its controversial plan, known as its “infill strategy,” to lease swathes of land in public housing developments to private developers. The deal would allow for the construction of new market-rate apartment buildings, along with a handfull of affordable housing units, in eight projects throughout Manhattan. But New York City Council and a group of tenants filed a lawsuit on Thursday to prevent the plan from moving forward. This past spring, the struggling agency issued a Request for Proposal seeking ideas from developers. The lawsuit slips in right before NYCHA’s November 18th deadline for proposals. The New York Times reported that the plaintiffs said that the agency failed to include City Council on the “decision-making regarding the plan to build on public housing grounds.” And moreover, government officials pointed out that the Bloomberg administration didn’t follow the standard protocol, which requires that agency officials go through City Council for approval.

In a statement to Times, NYCHA said: “It’s unfortunate that the City Council is attempting to block a proposal that would generate significant revenue for the New York City Housing Authority — money that would go directly into developments and repairs for residents.”

Filed Under: 

New Mixed-Use Complex to Join Philly’s Logan Square

East
Thursday, October 10, 2013
.
Rodin Square. (Courtesy MV+A Architects)

Rodin Square. (Courtesy MV+A Architects)

Philadelphia‘s Logan Square, home to the Penn Center and much of the city’s cultural district, is now experiencing an influx of commercial and residential development. The city just gave developer Neal Rodin the green light to move forward with his eponymous three-acre mixed-use project, Rodin Square.

Read More

Farewell to the Famed Graffiti Haven: 5Pointz Demolition Moves Ahead

East
Wednesday, October 9, 2013
.
5Pointz (Courtesy of 5Pointz NYC)

5Pointz (Courtesy of 5Pointz NYC)

It is the end of an era. The New York City Council voted in a favor of a plan to demolish the iconic 5Pointz, the former manufacturing building-turned-graffiti-mecca, in Long Island City, Queens, to make way for a $400 million residential development. The New York Times reported that the Wolkoff family, the owner and developer of the property, will build two residential towers—one of which will climb up to 47 stories—consisting all together of 1,000 units.

Continue reading after the jump.

Page 4 of 19« First...23456...10...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2015 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License