SOM’s Neil Katz on parametric modeling in facade design

Parametric model of structural system for a very early version of Tower One of the World Trade Center project, New York. (Courtesy Neil Katz)

Parametric model of structural system for a very early version of Tower One of the World Trade Center project, New York. (Courtesy Neil Katz)

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) associate Neil Katz describes his approach to crafting facades as involving a “computational design” methodology.

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Matthew Johnson on the Reemergence of Craft in the Digital Age

SGH engineered a timber-mullion curtain wall with novel timber moment connection for a cantilevered canopy at Cooper Gallery, with Marc Truant & Associates and David Adjaye Associates. (Courtesy Simpson Gumpertz & Heger)

SGH engineered a timber-mullion curtain wall with novel timber moment connection for a cantilevered canopy at Cooper Gallery, with Marc Truant & Associates and David Adjaye Associates. (Courtesy Simpson Gumpertz & Heger)

For much of its early history, architecture was more than a pragmatic response to the problem of shelter. It was infused by craft. “Craft has existed in all kinds of industry, especially architecture, for a long time,” said Simpson Gumpertz & Heger (SGH) principal Matthew Johnson. “But I feel it it lost its way in the twentieth century as we chased efficiency over quality.”

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Architect John Ronan talks opportunities, challenges in dynamic facade design

John Ronan Architects' Urban Filter Office Building, Geneva, Switzerland. (Courtesy John Ronan Architects)

John Ronan Architects’ Urban Filter Office Building, Geneva, Switzerland. (Courtesy John Ronan Architects)

In recent years, building envelope assemblies have become increasingly sophisticated, separating the skin from its traditional, structural function and thus making way for formal experimentation.

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Chris Wilkinson reflects on cutting-edge facade technologies

Detail, WilkinsonEyre's Cooled Conservatories, Gardens by the Bay, Singapore. (Courtesy WilkinsonEyre)

Detail, WilkinsonEyre’s Cooled Conservatories, Gardens by the Bay, Singapore. (Courtesy WilkinsonEyre)

Ask London-based WilkinsonEyre Director Chris Wilkinson to describe some of the interesting facades he has worked on recently, and you will hear him rattle off a dizzying array of materials, from glass to stone, concrete, brick, and timber.

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Critic Alastair Gordon diagnoses Miami with a case of “facade-ism”

Pérez Art Museum Miami. (Flickr / Phillip Pessar)

Pérez Art Museum Miami. (Flickr / Phillip Pessar)

Miami is a place of sunshine and gloss, bronzed bodies and signature cocktails. But for architecture critic and author Alastair Gordon, the underlying dynamics—including the harsh realities of income inequality and rising sea levels—are what make the city truly interesting.

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NBBJ’s New Orleans hospital embodies resilience

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NBBJ designed UMC's entry pavilion to recall New Orleans' porch culture. (Sean Airhart)

NBBJ designed UMC’s entry pavilion to recall New Orleans’ porch culture. (Sean Airhart)

High performance and cultural relevance meet in concrete, metal, and steel mesh envelope.

For the stakeholders involved in building the new Rev. Avery C. Alexander Academic Research Hospital (also known as University Medical Center, or UMC) in downtown New Orleans, the project was about much more than replacing facilities damaged during Hurricane Katrina.

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Developer Andrew Frey on aesthetics versus urbanism in Miami’s building codes

2020 Salzedo rental homes in Coral Gables. (Courtesy Andrew Frey / Codina)

2020 Salzedo rental homes in Coral Gables. (Courtesy Andrew Frey / Codina)

When it comes to navigating Miami’s zoning codes, Tecela principal Andrew Frey brings an experience-based advantage to the table. Before transitioning to the business side of development in early 2011, he spent six years as a zoning lawyer. “I always wanted to be a developer, and I learned a lot from my developer clients,” recalled Frey.

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The Facades+ conference digs into Miami architecture this September

The acclaimed Facades+ conference series is coming to Miami September 10-11. (Daniel Chodusov / Flickr)

The acclaimed Facades+ conference series is coming to Miami September 10-11. (Daniel Chodusov / Flickr)

Facades+, the premier conference on high performance building envelopes, stands out as an exception to the rule of generic meet-and-greets.

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KVA Brings Digital Brick to Harvard

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As part of an extensive renovation, Kennedy & Violich Architecture re-skinned Tozzer Library in a high performance brick, glass, and copper envelope. (John Horner Photography)

As part of an extensive renovation, Kennedy & Violich Architecture re-skinned Tozzer Library in a high performance brick, glass, and copper envelope. (John Horner Photography)

Old and new technologies combine in renovated anthropology building.

Tasked with transforming Harvard‘s 1971 Tozzer Library into a new home for the university’s Anthropology Department, Kennedy & Violich Architecture (KVA) faced a unique set of challenges. Read More

More on Miami’s remarkable growth from architect Allan Shulman

Downtown Miami is rapidly becoming a live-work destination. (Ed Webster / Flickr)

Downtown Miami is rapidly becoming a live-work destination. (Ed Webster / Flickr)

When it comes to development, said Allan Shulman, principal of Miami-based Shulman + Associates, “Miami has always been a true ‘boom and bust’ city, with the cycles highly compressed in comparison to other North American cities.”

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Hord Coplan Macht Pushes Performance at CSU

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Hord Coplan Macht's Suzanne and Walter Scott, Jr. Bioengineering Building achieved LEED Gold certification without sacrificing transparency. (Courtesy Hord Coplan Macht)

Hord Coplan Macht’s Suzanne and Walter Scott, Jr. Bioengineering Building achieved LEED Gold certification without sacrificing transparency. (Courtesy Hord Coplan Macht)

Ultra efficient curtain wall system marries transparency and sustainability.

For some institutions, building “sustainably” means doing the bare minimum—checking the boxes of government or in-house requirements and then moving on.

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Brooks + Scarpa’s Double-Skinned Research Center

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Brooks + Scarpa designed a "showpiece" research and testing center for Metalsa in Monterrey, Mexico. (John Linden)

Brooks + Scarpa designed a “showpiece” research and testing center for Metalsa in Monterrey, Mexico. (John Linden)

Perforated steel and translucent glass balance privacy and pop.

For their Center for Manufacturing Innovation (CMI) in Monterrey, Mexico, Metalsa, a global manufacturing firm that specializes in automobile and truck chassis, did not want just another factory. Read More

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