Maya Lin wins Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize

Architecture, Art, Awards, National
Thursday, October 9, 2014
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Maya Lin. (Courtesy Walter Smith)

Maya Lin. (Courtesy Walter Smith)

Maya Lin has won the 21st annual Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize for her “outstanding and continuing artistic contributions to society and to the beauty of the world,” according to the Gish Prize Trust. The prize, which was created in 1994 through the will of actress Lillian Gish, has a cash award valued at $300,000. Previous winners of the Gish Prize include Bob Dylan, Arthur Miller, Spike Lee, and Frank Gehry.

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Winners announced in vision42design competition to redesign New York’s 42nd Street

Awards, East, Transportation, Urbanism
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
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(Courtesy vision42design)

(Courtesy vision42design)

The 7 member vision42design jury met on October 3 and spent the day looking at nearly 200 digital design proposals to transform New York City’s 42nd Street. They easily decided on a list of ten projects that they considered the most outstanding. In a more contested second round of discussions, the jury was able to narrow these projects to a short list of three professional projects and a student-designed project to move onto the second round of the competition.

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Pictorial> Take a tour of Paul Rudolph’s only house in Detroit

Architecture, Midwest
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
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(Michelle & Chris Gerard)

(Michelle & Chris Gerard)

Today, AN reported on Detroit’s lone house designed by architect Paul Rudolph called the Parcells House. According to our article, “The waterfront home faces Lake Saint Clair and was designed to give waterfront views to almost every room. As the home sits on a lot at the end of a cul-de-sac where heavy plantings and trees cover the driveway and maintain privacy, it is, for the most part, only viewable by boat.” Check out a slideshow of the inside and outside of the house below and be sure to learn more about the property, currently on the market, over here.

View the slideshow after the jump.

San Francisco Arts Commission Votes to Remove Diller Scofidio + Renfro Public Art Project

Architecture, Art, News, Newsletter, West
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
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In a move that has angered critics and scholars, the San Francisco Arts Commission (SFAC) voted at its meeting on September 8 to remove the artwork, Facsimile, from the facade of the Moscone Center West, thus ending the history of a project that began in 1996 when architects Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio competed in a pool of 62 applicants that included Jenny Holzer, Anish Kapoor, and Nam June Paik and won the public art competition to design a site-specific project for the convention center in downtown San Francisco.

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BCJ’s Civic Center an Exercise in Democracy

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Bohlin Cywinski Jackson's design upends convention in favor of metaphorical and literal transparency. (Nic Lehoux)

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson’s design upends convention in favor of metaphorical and literal transparency. (Nic Lehoux)

Newport Beach’s central government complex emphasizes transparency, sustainability.

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson‘s (BCJ) Newport Beach Civic Center is in one sense classically Southern Californian. With its light steel structure, plentiful windows, emphasis on indoor-outdoor spaces, and roofline inspired by ocean waves, it evokes a timeless delight in Pacific coast living. But it also represents something new, both for the city of Newport Beach and for civic architecture more generally. Built on a marshy site that had previously been written off as uninhabitable, the LEED Gold Civic Center and adjacent 16-acre park, designed by BCJ in cooperation with PWP Landscape Architecture, acts as a different kind of anchor for the automobile-oriented community. “It was shaped in part by a desire to create a great public space,” said principal in charge Greg Mottola. “How do you make an urban civic space in the context of the suburbs?” Read More

Zip over Apple’s under-construction headquarters and take a seat in its newly-unveiled auditorium

Newsletter, West
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
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Apple's auditorium pavilion (Poltrona Frau Group)

Apple’s auditorium pavilion (via Poltrona Frau Group)

The excitement over Apple’s new mega-campus in Silicon Valley continues to build. First, we got an aerial drones-eye-view of the under-construction Apple Campus 2 in Cupertino, California (check it out after the jump!). And now, we get to see the corporate auditorium where the company will show off its new products once complete in 2016.

Continue reading after the jump.

Karim Rashid tones down colorful and controversial Harlem development

Architecture, East, News, Newsletter
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
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karim-rashid-HAP5_update

The original design and the new design with a less colorful facade, right. (Courtesy Karim Rashid / HAP Investment Developers)

When Karim Rashid unveiled his plans for Hap 5—a residential building in East Harlem that had fluorescent pink and turquoise balconies—there were, how should we put this, some detractors. Turns out, the the community wasn’t a huge fan of Rashid’s, let’s just say, vibrant color scheme.

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Faith Rose tapped as Executive Director of New York City’s Public Design Commission

Faith Rose, the new Executive Director of the Public Design Commission. (Courtesy

Faith Rose, the new Executive Director of the Public Design Commission. (Courtesy o’neill rose architects)

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has appointed Faith Rose, a former senior design liaison at the Department of Design and Construction (DDC), to lead the city’s Public Design Commission. According to the mayor’s office, in her new role, Rose “will be charged with building on the Public Design Commission’s history of prioritizing the quality and excellence of the public realm, enhancing and streamlining the Commission’s review process, and fostering accessibility, diversity and inclusion in the City’s public buildings and spaces.”

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Beer, Shakespeare, and hip hop take over a vacant lot in Downtown Louisville

ReSurfaced, a pop-up festival occupying a vacant lot in downtown Louisville. (Urban Design Studio)

ReSurfaced, a pop-up festival occupying a vacant lot in downtown Louisville. (Urban Design Studio via Flickr)

What can you do with a vacant lot? Urban activists in Louisville have set out to show just how much with an ongoing pop-up festival of sorts at 615-621 West Main Street, an empty plot of land in the heart of downtown where REX‘s Museum Plaza skyscraper was once set to rise.

Continue reading after the jump.

Red Deer Lights Up Burning Man

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As visitors climb on and around Luz 2.0, integrated sensors trigger an interactive lighting display. (Dustin Wong Photography)

As visitors climb on and around Luz 2.0, integrated sensors trigger an interactive lighting display. (Dustin Wong Photography)

Prismatic pyramid evokes desert mirage by day, Aurora Borealis by night.

Given that their pyramidal acrylic installation at this summer’s Burning Man was inspired in part by Pink Floyd‘s Dark Side of the Moon album cover, it seems safe to say that the architects at Red Deer “get” the festival’s vibe. “We try to get very intimate with our sites, so it was interesting to approach one that we hadn’t been able to visit,” said founding director Ciarán O’Brien. “Some of the primal forces we could see at play there were the heat of the desert and the way people interact with structures. Specifically, for us it was about light in all its forms.” The UK firm worked closely with the structural engineers at Structure Mode to design a transparent six-meter-tall structure comprising interlocking equilateral triangles, while New York Institute of Technology professor Charles Matz contributed an integrated light display based on the Aurora Borealis. “All kinds of imagery came to mind that held to the desert landscape,” said O’Brien. “By day, the concept evoked a mirage; by night, a kaleidoscope. One is ephemeral, a non-place; the other is specific, a beacon.” Read More

MVRDV’s enormous arched food hall and housing complex opens in Rotterdam

Markthal Rotterdam. (Courtesy facebook.com/MarkthalRotterdam)

Markthal Rotterdam. (Courtesy facebook.com/MarkthalRotterdam)

When the plan for Markthal Rotterdam first appeared, it seemed like one of those interesting, but never going to actually happen type of projects. There was no way that MVRDV’s sprawling food hall set underneath a 130-foot-tall arching roof that itself contains 228 apartments would ever be realized. Well, it turns out there was a way, and Rotterdam figured it out.

Continue reading after the jump.

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