On View> Parsons Festival 2013 in New York City

East
Monday, May 6, 2013
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(Courtesy Parsons)

(Courtesy Parsons)

New York City will be hit by a design storm this May. Along with the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) taking place May 18 through 21 at the Javits Center, The New School is throwing its annual Parsons Festival, May 5 through 24, at locations across the city. Both events feature cutting edge design establishing NYC as a major design capital.

More after the jump.

Orly Genger’s “Red, Yellow and Blue” Adds Bands of Color to Madison Square Park

City Terrain, East
Thursday, May 2, 2013
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Installation view of Orly Genger’s Red, Yellow and Blue in Madison Square Park. (The Architect's Newspaper)

Installation view of Orly Genger’s Red, Yellow and Blue in Madison Square Park. (The Architect’s Newspaper)

Yesterday, brilliant sunshine, a gentle spring breeze, and 65 degree weather set the scene for the inauguration ceremony of Orly Genger’s remarkable new art installation, titled Red, Yellow and Blue, in Madison Square Park. As you navigate your way through the park you will find yourself surrounded by a fanciful scene, as vibrant undulating walls arch into blossoming trees, spill onto lush lawns, and unfurl all around you.

“Orly Genger has woven her magic throughout the park,” said Mayor Bloomberg, who spoke at the inauguration ceremony. The large-scale project was installed as the latest chapter of Mad. Sq. Art, a public contemporary arts program presented by Madison Square Park Conservancy that aims to revitalize the park as well as the surrounding community. “[Red Yellow and Blue] is both innovative and environmentally sustainable. It is projects like this that are a big part of what gives New York City our identity and attracts visitors to our city,” said Bloomberg.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> MoMA Takes a Shower With New Rain Room Installation

East
Thursday, May 2, 2013
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DTCP_03_10_12_Rain_04.jpg

Photo of ‘Rain Room’, Courtesy of rAndom international

The gentle drumming sound of rainfall is one that many of us find soothing, but it is a natural phenomena that we can only experience at a safe distance without suffering the consequence of being drenched. With their one-of-a-kind installation, Rain Room, the designers at rAndom international made what you thought was impossible possible—presenting anyone who is curious for a new sensation with the opportunity to fully experience standing unprotected in the rain without ever getting wet.

Continue reading after the jump.

Wind Delays Topping Out at One World Trade

East
Monday, April 29, 2013
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One World Trade reaches its peak. (Courtesy Port Authority)

One World Trade reaches its peak. (Courtesy Port Authority)

Anticipation was running as high as the tower itself as construction crews were standing by to raise the final two sections of the spire to the top of One World Trade Center today, a move that would have officially made the tower the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere at 1,776 feet, but high winds brought on delays. The final two sections of the 408-foot-tall spire, capped by a shining, pointed beacon, were scheduled to rise this afternoon, but the Port Authority decided to wait for for clearer skies to top-off the tower.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Gutai: Splendid Playground at the Guggenheim Museum

East
Wednesday, April 24, 2013
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(Courtesy Guggenheim)

(Courtesy Guggenheim)

Gutai: Splendid Playground
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York
Through May 8

“Don’t imitate others!” and “Engage in the newness!” are just two of the signature slogans of the Gutai Art Association, founded in July 1954 by Jiro Yoshihara. The Gutai—which translates to “concreteness”—artists dared to breakthrough the boundaries presented by traditional Japanese art. As their name suggests, the artists directly engaged with concrete materials (such as remote-control toys, sand, light bulbs, and paper screens) to create a new, never before seen, kind of art. The creative genius of these avant-garde artists manifested itself in the form of various mediums including, but not limited to, painting, installation and performance art, experimental film, and environmental art. Gutai: Splendid Playground explores the works of these artists, created over a span of two-decades, and features an enormous installation by Motonaga Sadamasa composed of a series of plastic tubes filled with colored water. The structure, created specifically for the Guggenheim’s rotunda, invites visitors to look up and use these “brush strokes” to create their own individual composition.

Redevelopment of Manhattan’s Pier 57 Moved Forward With City Council Approval

East, Newsletter
Tuesday, April 23, 2013
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Pier 57

Pier 57. (Courtesy Wikipedia)

As Spring approaches, perhaps in the spirit of rejuvenation, the New York City Council has unanimously approved plans to revitalize Manhattan’s Pier 57, the historic pier located at 15th Street and the Hudson River. In 2009 architecture firm Young Woo & Associates set in motion a plan to transform the Pier into a multi-use cultural, retail, and restaurant hub, and, with the City Council’s approval in hand, the developers can finally begin the long-awaited redevelopment of the pier.

Pier 57 was built in 1952 by Emil Praeger. At the time of construction the engineer received great acclaim for his pioneering design—the Pier floats on three buoyant hollow concrete boxes that were flooded down the river. The new plan to restore the historic landmark conserves the original framing while renovating the 375,000 square feet of interior and rooftop space.

Continue reading after the jump.

On View> Walking “The Web” at the Swiss Institute

East
Monday, April 22, 2013
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(Courtesy Swiss Institute)

(Courtesy Swiss Institute)


The Web
Swiss Institute
New York
Through April 28

Jon Kessler’s The Web, currently on view at the Swiss Institute through April 28, is an immersive array of monitors, enlarged MacBooks, cameras, mechanical and animatronic sculptures—the latter of the artist himself—set to a sound track of the eponymous Apple computer chime. Enabled through mobile technology, the environment plugs you into a closed-circuit feedback loop. You download an iPhone app that allows you to feed your experience of the installation into the system as your movements are also simultaneously tracked, captured, and fed into the system. Cleverly re-staging Jean Tinguely’s self destructive drawing machine for the digital age, you are only image. Caught in this web, you are broadcast at those moments when you think you are most in control. You appear only to disappear and then to reappear somewhere else again, and again. You have your images, but The Web has you.

At 7pm, Saturday, April 28 at the Swiss Institute, Jon Kessler will hold a press conference/performance announcing the launch of his latest business enterprise, GlblVlgIdiot, devoted to the creation of iPhone apps similar to The Web that “bridge the gap between life and art.” Click here for reservations.

On View> At War With The Obvious: Photographs by William Eggleston

East
Monday, April 22, 2013
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(William Eggleston)

(William Eggleston)

At War With The Obvious: Photographs by William Eggleston
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Howard Gilman Gallery 852
New York
Through July 28

William Eggleston, one of the first American photographers to experiment with modern color photography in the 1960s, is known for his ability to capture the essence of southern life through photographs of ordinary people, scenes of everyday life, and commonplace objects, such as a child’s tricycle or a sign reading “Peaches!” set against the backdrop of a cerulean blue sky. Eggleston produced much of his color photography with a dye transfer printmaking process, a technique that was previously used solely for commercial and advertising purposes, and established it as a prominent artistic medium in the American tradition. The Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibition, At War With the Obvious, celebrates Eggleston’s work by presenting together for the first time thirty-six dye transfer prints he created in the 1970s. It also features his first portfolio of color photographs, fifteen prints from his landmark book, and seven other of his most recognized photographs.

More photos after the jump.

Petitions and Design Ideas Sprout to Save Folk Art Museum Building.

East
Friday, April 19, 2013
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(Courtesy FolkMoMA)

(Courtesy FolkMoMA)

As the chorus of criticism swells against MoMA’s plan to demolish the former home of the American Folk Art Museum, designed by Tod Williams and Billie Tsien, a pair of petitions have been posted urging the Modern to reconsider its demolition plans. Also, a crowd-sourced tumblr, #FolkMoMA, is soliciting ideas for reuse of Williams and Tsien’s building. With all the action online, will anyone be taking to the streets for some old fashioned picketing? Will anyone chain themselves to the bronze facade? Has all this worry actually left the bubble of the architecture community?

View some of the FolkMoMA proposals after the jump.

Photo of the Day: Amazing View From One World Trade

East
Thursday, April 18, 2013
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View from the top of One World Trade Center. (Courtesy Port Authority)

View from the top of One World Trade Center. (Courtesy Port Authority)

A couple weeks ago, we took a look at the trippy designs of the newly unveiled observation deck for Lower Manhattan’s One World Trade tower, rapidly adding to its antenna that will take the building to 1,776 feet. But while those renderings were long on the multimedia-rich halls that will presumably be filled with long lines waiting to get to the top, the big unveil was a bit short on the actual view. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has corrected that, however, posting a new photo taken from the very top of the tower, and we’re not disappointed. Note that Cass Gilbert’s 1913 Woolworth Building, appearing as just another tower in the center of the photo, was once the world’s tallest until 1930. See you in line for the view in person!

Video> Sandhogs Blast Bedrock Beneath Grand Central Terminal

East
Tuesday, April 9, 2013
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New York City’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) has completed blasting through bedrock far below Grand Central Terminal for the East Side Access Tunnels that will connect the station with Sunnyside, Queens. As part of the announcement, one of the last production blasts from late March has debuted on YouTube. The video above reveals what has been transpiring beneath the streets of Manhattan during the tunneling process, and the sight is rather impressive. A camera caught the final blast that made way for a massive cavern. So far 2,424 production blasts have occurred below the commuter rail terminal station, which is celebrating its 100th birthday this year. For this explosion, sandhogs drilled more than 200 blast holes and loaded them with over 300 pounds of powder to guarantee a powerful explosion that could rival any action movie’s special effects.

Event> Celebrate Mapping Manhattan’s Cartographic Autobiographies

East
Tuesday, April 9, 2013
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Cover of Mapping Manhattan and two example maps. (Courtesy Becky Cooper)

Cover of Mapping Manhattan and two example maps. (Courtesy Becky Cooper)

For an authentic tour of Manhattan, try following a map of love and hate, bizarre relationships, or perhaps even lost gloves. Author Becky Cooper brings a collaborative art project that has inspired many New Yorkers to share their varied emotions about the city. Mapping Manhattan: A Love (and Sometimes Hate) Story in Maps is the book  featuring 75 maps filled in by strangers, hopeless romantics, and street vendors, among others.

To celebrate the publication of Mapping ManhattanCultureNOW is hosting an event to benefit Summer 2013 Internship Programs on Monday, April 15 from 6:00-8:00pm at architecture firm Snøhetta’s offices.

Continue reading after the jump.

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