Hadrian Predock selected to lead USC undergraduate architecture program

Dean's List, News, Shft+Alt+Del, West
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
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Hadrian Predock (USC)

Hadrian Predock (USC)

USC School of Architecture has announced that Hadrian Predock will serve as its next director of undergraduate programs. Starting this fall he will take over the position from Alice Kimm, who served for four years. “I’m thrilled,” said Predock. “This is an exciting time as architecture continues to pull out of the recession, and I’m looking forward to helping position the school in larger conversations about where the profession is going.”

Continue reading after the jump.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin School of Architecture is losing its accreditation

Architecture, Dean's List, Midwest, News, West
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
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Talisen West Studio and Reflecting Pool (Judith Bromley)

Taliesin West Studio and reflecting pool. (Judith Bromley)

Frank Lloyd Wright, who founded the Taliesin Fellowship in 1932, can’t be pleased about the latest news from the school. Architectural Record reported that in 2017 the Taliesin School of Architecture—which currently offers Masters of Architecture degrees at its campuses in Scottsdale, Arizona and Spring Green, Wisconsin—will lose its NAAB accreditation.

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Eavesdrop> Dust off your white leather jacket, Karim Rashid is back in town

Karim Rashid's HAP 5.

Karim Rashid’s HAP 5.

Warmed over designer from the early 2000s, Karim Rashid, is back! The man in white is designing three new residential properties in upper Manhattan, “HAP FOUR N.Y.” in West Harlem, “HAP FIVE N.Y.” in East Harlem, and “HAP SIX N.Y.” in Inwood. Known for curving forms, extensive use of plastics, and bright colors, Rashid has designed numerous products and interiors, such as the bulbous bottles for Method cleaning products. As Rashid steps into the world of architecture, his—let’s say, expressive—approach has come under fire. But there’s no stopping him now…

Continue reading after the jump.

Bjarke Ingels gets rejected in Utah…again

Architecture, News, Newsletter, West
Monday, August 25, 2014
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BIG's second proposal. (Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group)

BIG’s second, and rejected, proposal. (Courtesy Bjarke Ingels Group)

It’s strike two for Danish design in Utah. Bjarke Ingels’ second proposed expansion of the Kimball Art Center in Park City, Utah did not fare any better than his first. The Park City News is reporting that the local City Hall rejected the firm’s updated design because it failed to meet the “municipal government’s strict Old Town guidelines.” Or, to put it simply, it just didn’t fit in. That’s essentially what the Park City community said about BIG’s first design—a dramatic, twisting, log cabin-like structure.

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Michigan’s first bus rapid transit line launches today in Grand Rapids

Grand Rapids, home to Michigan's first bus rapid transit line. (Ian Freimuth via Flickr)

Grand Rapids, home to Michigan’s first bus rapid transit line. (Ian Freimuth via Flickr)

Michigan‘s first bus rapid transit line launches this week, whisking passengers from downtown Grand Rapids through the city’s “Medical Mile” and south suburbs—a 9.6-mile journey that used to take 45 minutes will now be only a 27-minute commute, reported mlive.com.

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Back in the game: HOK to acquire 360 Architecture, reenter sports architecture field

Architecture, National, News
Wednesday, August 20, 2014
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San Jose Earthquakes Stadium (360 Architecture)

San Jose Earthquakes Stadium (360 Architecture)

In a power play for the world of arena architecture, HOK has announced it will acquire Kansas City’s 360 Architecture. Their union marks HOK’s return to the world of sports and entertainment facility design, possibly to compete with Populous, another Kansas City-based firm that spun off from HOK Sports Venue Event in 2008. Read More

Goettsch Partners to design five towers in booming Shenzhen’s Qianhai district

Chicago's Goettsch Partners will design five towers for Shenzhen, China's Qianhai district, which Chinese authorities say will one day be the "Manhattan of the Pearl River Delta." (Goesttch Partners)

Chicago’s Goettsch Partners will design five towers for Shenzhen, China’s Qianhai district, which Chinese authorities say will one day be the “Manhattan of the Pearl River Delta.” (Goesttch Partners)

Goettsch Partners landed its largest project in China, a cluster of five towers on 15 acres in Shenzhen’s Qianhai district. China Resources Land Limited (CR Land) hired the Chicago-based Goettsch to design 5.4 million square feet of space for offices, apartments, a five-star hotel, and retail. U.K.–based Benoy is the masterplanner, and is designing a shopping mall and retail areas at the towers’ base.

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Redevelopment projects piling up along the Los Angeles River

View of the new Marsh Park (SMMC Archives)

View of the Marsh Park expansion (SMMC Archives)

Although the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has yet to secure funding for its planned $1 billion restoration of the Los Angeles River, projects along the waterway’s banks are sprouting up regularly, including parks, cafes, trails, and even new buildings. The latest, reported KCET, is the Elysian Valley Marsh Park, a three-acre landscape expansion on what was once an auto body complex in LA’s Elysian Valley neighborhood.

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Was The Revel Casino’s Design Its Fatal Flaw?

Development, East, News, Newsletter
Monday, August 18, 2014
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The Revel Casino. (Courtesy Revel)

The Revel Casino. (Courtesy Revel)

Two years ago, AN visited the newly-opened Revel Casino in Atlantic City. At the time, the glassy $2.4 billion complex, designed by Arquitectonica and BLT Architects, was expected to be a transformative property for the iconic boardwalk that offered gambling, convention space, and entertainment. “It’s more of an urban development plan than a typical casino plan,” Revel CEO Kevin DeSanctis told AN. “I am really hoping that we are successful.” In mid-August, we learned that they were not. In its short two-and-a-half year lifespan, the casino never turned a profit.

Continue reading after the jump.

Los Angeles’ grand Spring Arcade coming back to life

View of the Spring Arcade's cleaned up three-level arcade (BRC Advisors)

View of the Spring Arcade’s cleaned up three-level arcade (BRC Advisors)

Another symbol of downtown Los Angeles’ transformation is the ongoing renovation and rebranding of the Spring Arcade Building. Modeled after the great Beaux Arts arcades of Europe, the space has long been a grubby home for non-distinct shops. The Arcade—actually two 12-story towers connected by the skylit, glass roofed, three-level arcade—was built in 1924 by architects Kenneth McDonald and Maurice Couchot. With its Spanish Baroque entryway, it originally contained 61 shops, and later added a Venetian-style bridge across its center. It now contains space for 21 shops and restaurants and still contains the landmark KRKD radio towers on its roof.

Continue reading after the jump.

Arquitectonica to replace OMA at Miami Convention Center redevelopment

Architecture, East, News, Newsletter
Tuesday, August 12, 2014
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What could have been - OMA's plan for Miami Convention Center. (Courtesy OMA)

What could have been – OMA’s plan for Miami Convention Center. (Courtesy OMA)

Some of the most exciting renderings of the past few years came out of the epic face-off between teacher and student for Miami’s convention center. We’re of course referring to bids by Rem Koolhaas’ OMA and the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) to radically expand and  transform the facility. While it looked like a pretty evenly-matched fight, Rem ultimately won-out with a dramatic transformation of the site. But it was only a matter of time until project accountants and fiscally conservative politicians made it clear that Rem’s billion dollar plans were not going to be realized.

Continue reading after the jump.

Detroit’s infamous theater-turned-parking garage sold at auction

Detroit's crumbling Michigan Theatre has fallen into disrepair since its 1926 construction. (Hermann Schleicher-Roevenstrunck via Flickr)

Detroit’s Michigan Theatre has fallen into disrepair since its 1926 construction. (Hermann Schleicher-Roevenstrunck via Flickr)

Detroit’s Michigan Theatre remains iconic, but not for the reasons that made it so during its early 20th century heyday. Now the opulent 1926 concert hall holds parked cars instead of theater-goers. Will it remain a symbol of Detroit’s struggle to recover from long-term disinvestment, or could it become emblematic of the city’s resilience?

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