Mayor de Blasio signs legislation to lower New York City’s default speed limit

Mayor de Blasio signing 25mph legislation. (NYC Mayor's Office)

Mayor de Blasio signing 25mph legislation. (NYC Mayor’s Office)

Mayor Bill de Blasio has signed legislation to lower New York City’s default speed limit from 30 miles per hour to 25. The measure was recently passed by the City Council and is one of the central policy pieces of Vision Zero—the mayor’s plan to eliminate traffic fatalities in the city.

Read More

The September Architecture Billings Index is on top of the world

Architecture, National, News
Monday, October 27, 2014
.
BILLINGS (BLUE), INQUIRIES (RED), AND DESIGN CONTRACTS (GREEN) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

BILLINGS (BLUE), INQUIRIES (RED), AND DESIGN CONTRACTS (GREEN) FOR THE PAST 12 MONTHS. (THE ARCHITECT’S NEWSPAPER)

The Architecture Billings Index (ABI) report is back and it’s ready to party so drop that Monday morning cup of coffee and take a sip of the hot data the AIA is serving up. Last month, while we were all just going about our everyday lives, the ABI was soaring to new heights. Any score above a 50 indicates an increase in billings, but the ABI wasn’t satisfied with playing it safe. No, it went all the way to 55.2. Sure, it’s not the 55.8 that got the world talking in July, but it’s still good news and better than August’s 53.0, am I right? There’s more.

Continue reading after the jump.

More Mergers> NAC Architecture and Osborn joining forces

News, Shft+Alt+Del, West
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
.
Rendering of NAC's new LA offices. (Courtesy NAC)

Rendering of NAC’s new LA offices. (Courtesy NAC)

It’s no AECOM and URS, but NAC Architecture, which has offices in Spokane, WA, Seattle, Denver, and Los Angeles has merged with Southern California firm Osborn, and are moving their LA operations into new offices in the city’s Chinatown neighborhood. NAC’s 13,000 square foot LA office, to be located on the third floor of a historic building at 837 North Spring Street, will consist of 40 people, including all of Osborn and NAC’s current LA staffs.

Read More

Kean University announces Michael Graves School of Architecture

Exterior of Wenzhou Kean Campus. (Michael Graves via Kean University)

Exterior of Wenzhou Kean Campus. (Michael Graves via Kean University)

This Saturday, Kean University, in Union, New Jersey, will launch the Michael Graves School of Architecture in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Michael Graves Architecture & Design. Over his career, Graves has racked up an impressive list of architectural accolades including the AIA Gold Medal, the National Medal of the Arts, and the Driehaus Prize for Architecture.

Read More

RIBA awards Liverpool’s Everyman Theatre the prestigious Stirling Prize

Everyman Theatre (Courtesy Philip Vile)

Everyman Theatre (Courtesy Philip Vile)

The Everyman Theatre in Liverpool, England—a cultural institution with a democratic spirit and a history of producing thespian talent—has topped the competition including Zaha Hadid and won the much sought-after 2014 Stirling Prize from the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). The new building, designed by Haworth Tompkins, a London-based firm boasting of more than a dozen theater projects, replaces Everyman’s former home in the shell of Hope Hall, a 19th century dissenter’s chapel.

Continue reading after the jump.

Meet Fleurt, New York’s most anticipated chair of the fall season

Behold, the Fleurt. (Courtesy Andrew Jones)

Behold, the Fleurt. (Courtesy Andrew Jones via NYC Parks and The Battery Conservancy)

Fleurt, the winning design for the Battery Conservancy America’s “Draw Up a Chair” competition, has been described as an “archetypal floral form” and even a “whimsical suggestion of sun-loving flowers floating in a field.” But it is much more than that. Fleurt “announces openness and photogenic warmth” and creates a “memorable, diaphanous landscape.” Fleurt “stretches out” with its “lounging curves.” Fleurt is, yes, fine, technically a chair.

Continue reading after the jump.

Tour 150 of Chicago’s architectural gems this weekend for free at Open House Chicago

The 190 South LaSalle building was designed by Philip Johnson and John Burgee in 1968 as an homage to Burnham & Root’s demolished 1892 Masonic Temple Building. (Eric Allix Rogers)

The 190 South LaSalle building was designed by Philip Johnson and John Burgee in 1968 as an homage to Burnham & Root’s demolished 1892 Masonic Temple Building. (Eric Allix Rogers)

Open House Chicago is this weekend, October 18 and 19, when 150 of the city’s architectural gems—both new and old, well-known and obscure, public year-round and off-limits but for now—open their doors to enthusiasts of the built environment, free of charge. Read More

Long-vacant grain silos in Chicago up for auction, future uncertain

One of Chicago‘s most visible rust-belt remnants is up for sale, just in time for its cameo in the Transformers 4 movie. The derelict Santa Fe grain elevator has been a favorite hangout for squatters, graffiti artists and ruin-porn enthusiasts since 1977, when a fire and explosion ended 70 years of industrial history there.

Continue reading after the jump.

Cook County mulls options for long-abandoned, beaux-arts hospital in Chicago

(Courtesy Chicago Architecture Foundation)

(Courtesy Chicago Architecture Foundation)

Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle briefly took the lectern at the Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) Tuesday night to welcome presentations on the future of an infamous white elephant structure on the city’s near West Side: the old Cook County Hospital building. “We believe that this building has inherent value,” Preckwinkle said, “and that a thoughtful process like this can help unlock that value.” Read More

San Francisco Arts Commission Votes to Remove Diller Scofidio + Renfro Public Art Project

Architecture, Art, News, Newsletter, West
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
.

dsr-boot-01

In a move that has angered critics and scholars, the San Francisco Arts Commission (SFAC) voted at its meeting on September 8 to remove the artwork, Facsimile, from the facade of the Moscone Center West, thus ending the history of a project that began in 1996 when architects Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio competed in a pool of 62 applicants that included Jenny Holzer, Anish Kapoor, and Nam June Paik and won the public art competition to design a site-specific project for the convention center in downtown San Francisco.

Read More

Karim Rashid tones down colorful and controversial Harlem development

Architecture, East, News, Newsletter
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
.
karim-rashid-HAP5_update

The original design and the new design with a less colorful facade, right. (Courtesy Karim Rashid / HAP Investment Developers)

When Karim Rashid unveiled his plans for Hap 5—a residential building in East Harlem that had fluorescent pink and turquoise balconies—there were, how should we put this, some detractors. Turns out, the the community wasn’t a huge fan of Rashid’s, let’s just say, vibrant color scheme.

Read More

Chicago’s big building owners embrace the smart grid

Chicago is one of 10 cities targeted by philanthropies for energy efficiency savings. (josh*m via flickr)

Large downtown buildings make up a disproportionate share of the built environment’s energy usage. (josh*m via flickr)

The members of Chicago‘s Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) control nearly 80 percent of downtown Chicago’s rentable building area. That makes them critical to local energy efficiency initiatives that aim to reduce the nearly 40 percent of U.S. energy that is consumed by buildings. Read More

Page 1 of 1312345...10...Last »

Advertise on The Architect's Newspaper.

Submit your competitions for online listing.

Submit your events to AN's online calendar.




Archives

Categories

Copyright © 2014 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC | AN Blog Admin Log in. The Architect's Newspaper LLC, 21 Murray Street 5th Floor | New York, New York 10007 | tel. 212.966.0630
Creative Commons License